Week of November 26, 2012 READING thread!
Post ReplyPost New TopicPosted 11/25/2012 by batya in NSBR Board
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batya
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Posted: 11/25/2012 8:02:55 PM
Hi Pea readers! Lots of variety for me this week.

First was a quick little memoir, The Book of Mormon Girl. She talks about her fundamentalist upbringing and how she ultimately left it. Likable book although one chapter left me about Marie Osmond and her beauty tips. But the author redeemed herself later in the book with some really interesting chapters.

Then, National Book Award finalist, A Hologram for the King by Dave Eggers. I had high hopes for this one. It was definitely readable but I was waiting for a payoff and the end and it fell flat. I'd like to know how others felt about this one. Ultimately, it did not win the NBA and I'm glad. It was not up to snuff. About a failed American businessman who goes to the middle east to try and build back his finances with a big idea.

Next was Herman Wouk's newest, yes he is still writing- The Lawgiver, an epistolary novel with HW as a main character telling a Moses story woven in the fabric of a movie maker's tale and their stories. For a man who is 96 y/o and still writing, it was not bad! Also a very quick read.

Then, my go-to type of social science non-fiction, How Children Succeed. The premise, through various case and other studies is that IQ, flashcards, early reading and intelligence is not the best predictor of success, rather character, grit, perseverance and resilience are. Liked this one and agreed with much of it.

Lastly on pea rec, Mystie and one other (who?), I just finished Stephen King's, The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon. It was OK. I didn't love it. It was too much like Hatchet which I just read with my girls, so the redundancy may have kept me from getting interested.

You're up! Always looking for new reads and to chat about old ones.


OK. Newbie. This is how it works. If your post consists of 80% sanity, 10% stupidity and 10% all kinds of crazy, we immediately focus on the 20% b/c it discredits the 80%.




Tearisci
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Posted: 11/25/2012 8:07:55 PM
I just finished The Bone Bed by Patricia Cornwell. I liked it more than her previous few books.

I'm about a quarter of the way through Reached the 3rd book in the Matched trilogy. So far so good. I had been waiting for it to come out for awhile so I'm glad to finally be reading it!

SockMonkey
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Posted: 11/25/2012 8:10:38 PM
I just started Doris Kearns-Goodwin's "Team of Rivals" (after seeing "Lincoln" ).


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freecharlie
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Posted: 11/25/2012 8:14:28 PM
I started the week off with a short story (100 pages or so) book by Connie Willis called DA. It was a decent, quick read.

Then, I read Witch World by Christopher Pike. I loved his stuff as a teen and I continue to read each and every book he writes.

I will finish The Demigod Diaries tonight. My children and I love to read these books with a background of Greek and Roman Mythology.

I will then start a book called Found by Margaret Peterson Haddix. The concept is intriguing to me as the characters apparently are figures from the past or something.


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Posted: 11/25/2012 8:27:43 PM
On audio I finished The Witness by Nora Roberts. I liked this one, but the end seemed to wrap up a little too fast. Very similar to The Search. If you're a NR fan, then you'll like it.

On Kindle I finished The Shadowy Horses by Susanna Kearsley. This was another historical fiction, but not time traveler-y like her other books. I finished this one quickly.

I'm halfway through Freeman by Leonard Pitts Jr. It's about the first days/months after the end of the Civil War. As much as I've read about that time period it still amazes me how mean people were.

After this I may need a couple of fluff reads!

ETA: Batya, thanks for starting this thread this each week. Even though I don't read all the books, I love seeing what others are reading.

kms66
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Posted: 11/25/2012 8:29:17 PM
I read Silver Girl by Elin Hilderbrand. It was okay about a woman trying to deal with life after her husband is arrested and convicted of a huge Ponzi scheme.

Now I'm reading Tell the Wolves I'm Home. Good so far.


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SMayer
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Posted: 11/25/2012 8:31:56 PM

I started, "Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet", and my friend told me not to bother, so I put it down.


I finished it, and I'm the only one I know who didn't like it. It just didn't seem believable to me.

RobbyKay
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Posted: 11/25/2012 8:35:25 PM
Hi Peas Who Read!

I finished two this week...

The first was Iced by Karen Marie Moning. It's the first book in a new trilogy, spun off from her Fever series. It was enjoyable, and I'm looking forward to the next book.

The next was Peter Rock's My Abandonment. I would call it a YA novel inspired by a true story. The premise is a man and his daughter live secretly in Forest Park in Portland, OR. This was the based-on-reality part. In real-life, a man and his daughter were discovered living in the park, were detained, then were provided with a home and a job for the father. Everything seemed peachy until they disappeared,never to be heard from again.

In the book, the story twists and turns in a very different direction. I never saw it coming, and I stayed up way too late because I HAD to finish it!

It's told from the perspective of the 13 year-old daughter, so if you liked the voice of Age of Miracles or Tell the Wolves I'm Home, I would recommend this one.


Robby

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Posted: 11/25/2012 9:05:05 PM
I haven't posted for the last couple weeks. I've been very busy, so just relaxing and re-reading a few old favorites.I did read a new one last week. One for the Money by Janet Evanovich. I know, I'm years behind, but I just never had an urge to read the series before. Now I'm hooked and can't wait to start the second one.

Also re-reading Lion in the Valley by Elizabeth Peters. I just love Amelia Peabody.







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MommyofTriplets
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Posted: 11/25/2012 9:06:51 PM

Then, National Book Award finalist, A Hologram for the King by Dave Eggers. I had high hopes for this one. It was definitely readable but I was waiting for a payoff and the end and it fell flat. I'd like to know how others felt about this one.


I wanted this book to be so much better than it was.

I read a bunch this week because of the holiday. I finished Dearie: The Remarkable Life of Julia Child. I thought it was really interesting - she led a fascinating life.

Next was In the Pleasure Groove: Love, Death, and Duran Duran, a memoir by John Taylor. It wasn't the best written memoir, but it was interesting. I loved Duran Duran as a kid, so it was cool to read about how the group started, etc. I love how John described his experience in the '80s - both being shaped by it and then shaping it himself with DD.

Third was a book called The Fifty Year Sword which was originally performed as a live reading every Halloween. It's a spooky tale and I could see a performance being captivating, but the book fell flat. The story is augmented by intricate stitching on the pages, which would have added a lot more to the experience if it wasn't just printed on the page, but was instead actually stitched. Anyway, not my favorite - luckily, it was short.

I finally got around to The Woman Who Wasn't There. I wish she would have had something to say after it all came out. The ending was unsatisfying. I truly hope that those who were around her have been able to continue their healing.

Now I'm reading 11/22/63 and loving it so far. I don't read Stephen King often, but I do like to get lost in a ginormous Stephen King book every few years!

Amy

merlot1024
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Posted: 11/25/2012 9:24:28 PM
I read The Woman Who Wasn't There. For some reason I think I forgot to post this one the week I read it. It's been almost 2 weeks. I wanted so much to believe she lied in order to help people heal. In the end she was just evil. I really wanted to hear more from her about why she did what she did. I hope one day she will speak out, although I'm not sure she will ever be believed again.

I also read Into the Darkest Corner. I started this one yesterday morning and couldn't go to bed without finishing it. It was a page turner and not terribly predictable. I do want to warn you-there are some intense rape scenes in the book. I know that sometimes bothers people-I tended to read over those pretty quickly.

I currently have 4 books on my Nook from the library. I'm not sure which to read.

SnappinSami
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Posted: 11/25/2012 9:41:59 PM
It was a big reading week for me, as I was in between jobs so I had plenty of time to curl up with my Kindle.

First up was The Sweet Gum Tree by Katherine Allred. I really felt like I got to know the characters, and enjoyed the story. Four stars.

Next up was The Unwanted Wife by Natasha Anders. I found the story a little borting and meh, and got tired of the schtick going on between the husband and wife. A little too stupid, IMO. Three stars.

After that, I tackled Me Again by Keith Cronin. The premise of the story hooked me - a 34-year-old man waking up from a 6-year coma, having no idea who he is/was, and his rediscovery of himself. I actually really liked the book a lot. Four stars.

Then I read Where'd You Go, Bernadette? by Maria Semple. Parts of it were pretty cute/funny, and I found myself laughing out loud a lot while I read it. But overall, the story was just off a little for me. Three stars.

After reading all of those, I figured I'd give my Amazon account a break and read a book that my mom had bought on our shared account. It's The Language of Flowers by Vanessa Diffenbaugh. I just started it tonight. Too early to tell.

Oh, and I'm still listening to Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson. It's my commute soundtrack, so I'll be back on that tomorrow. I'm about 2/3 of the way through it. It's fascinating, but boy, he was one tough character.

Happy reading, everyone!


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batya
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Posted: 11/25/2012 9:57:38 PM

started, "Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet", and my friend told me not to bother, so I put it down.


That's a shame. I loved it and I know a few other people who loved it, as well.

The Casual Vacancy was a very good read. I think the mixed reviews came from people who would not have been happy with anything coming from JK Rowling that was not another juggernaut Harry Potter. I also think that some people don't like a book without characters they like a lot and this book had a lot of characters without redeeming qualities. But this was a good, well-written story. Read it!


Batya, thanks for starting this thread this each week. Even though I don't read all the books, I love seeing what others are reading


Me, too. You're welcome!

Ditto your thoughts on The Woman WHo Wasn't There. She was pure evil and the end was frustrating, besides. Why did she do it? What was her psychological problem? Too many unanswered questions. What was the point of telling the story?


OK. Newbie. This is how it works. If your post consists of 80% sanity, 10% stupidity and 10% all kinds of crazy, we immediately focus on the 20% b/c it discredits the 80%.




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Posted: 11/25/2012 10:20:42 PM
Sometimes I wonder if I read so much and so fast that I can't even remember what I've read.

This week, I've read Casual Vacancy, the Xibalba Murder by Lynn Hamilton, The Maltese Goddess by Lyn Hamilton (both adventure Mysteries) and I'm just finishing up Divergence based on the recommendation of the Peas.

I know I read another book but I can't remember the title or the author.





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merlot1024
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Posted: 11/25/2012 10:26:52 PM
Lauren you need to track them on Goodreads.com . Sometimes that's the only way I can remember.


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Peal
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Posted: 11/25/2012 10:41:30 PM
I started The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains But I haven't gotten very far as I spent the week sorting out roots and radicals for my college course. After my test tomorrow I hope to get back into it. I expect it is going to be a very interesting book. Just the first two chapters have made me fear for what we are doing to ourselves.


Christina

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~Lauren~
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Posted: 11/25/2012 10:42:38 PM
Thanks. I'll check out goodreads.





Any man who thinks he can be happy and prosperous by letting the government take care of him better take a closer look at the American Indian - Henry Ford

*Shannah*
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Posted: 11/25/2012 10:49:32 PM
I've been reading Douglas Preston/Lincoln Child books for the past week. I'm on book 6 of the Pendergast series. I've checked out the Memory Keeper's Daughter and Loyal In Love (by Jean Plaidy) from Overdrive, based on recommendations from Goodreads. I'm looking for some different stuff to read.

kma
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Posted: 11/26/2012 5:46:33 AM

I started, "Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet", and my friend told me not to bother, so I put it down.


I really enjoyed this book as someone else said above.

This week I finished The Light Between Oceans which was excellent but it did take me some time to get into. Now I'm reading The Kitchen House and re-reading A Thousand Splendid Suns with a friend who's also reading it. So far I'm enjoying The Kitchen House.

I think I'll be reading a sequel next. It's A Christmas Home by Greg Kincaid and is a sequel to A Dog Named Christmas .


Kim

peggyd
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Posted: 11/26/2012 5:52:14 AM
I'm with Lauren the last few weeks been reading lots more .while I was sick I couldn't concentrate but I am making up for lost time .I read the Kauffman Christmas ,The Covenet ,The Amish Midwife .I really liked all of them .I have quite a few on hold at the library that are almost ready to checkout so I better get busy .I also have Debra Mccomber Glad tidings to read


Since there is no spell check, there will be spelling errors!

Linda-H
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Posted: 11/26/2012 7:41:52 AM
I finished State of Wonder by Ann Patchett. I thought it was good.

I read Reflected in You by Sylvia Day, the second book in the Crossfire series. I'm not sure why I even picked this up, since I did not really enjoy the first book all that much. I enjoyed this one even less. At least it was a quick read.

I am listening to The Christmas Note by Donna VanLiere. I usually listen to one of her Christmas novels each year in the car. I am enjoying this so far.

guzismom
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Posted: 11/26/2012 8:04:20 AM
I read only one: Red Mist by Patricia Cornwall. It was predictable; true to her style. I enjoyed it.

I have a pile I got from the library including some historical fiction and a mystery from a series I like.


Marilyn (now in New Mexico!!)
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spitfiregirl
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Posted: 11/26/2012 8:09:52 AM
I am pretty picky about which books i read. If it doesnt grab me within the first few pages i dont waste my time. This one grabbed me.

I am reading THE PHYSICIAN BY NOAH GORDON . Its set in the 1100's and its about an orphaned boy who has becomes a doc. Its pretty good so far.

I also finished THE DOVEKEEPERS. it was great. Another novel set in 1100's. A story of 5 women. I really enjoyed it. THE DOVEKEEPERS


MaryAnn





powderhorngreen
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Posted: 11/26/2012 8:29:33 AM
I worked and worked and worked to get through The Danger of Proximal Alphabets by Katheen Alcott. I made it 3/4 of the way and then it hit me that it was masochistic to keep moving forward. The writing was choppy and, while it had potential, I just couldn't stand any longer the author's continual feeling of impending doom and crisis with nothing happening in the story at all. It was like reading a stream of conscience diary.

So, I started Night Circus to ensure a better experience this week - all those peas can't be wrong.

S_cR_aP_Booker
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Posted: 11/26/2012 8:38:22 AM
I haven't been feeling well, so I have read several this week.

THe first one I read was Lee Child's first Jack Reacher novel Killing Floor[/url. I really liked it. Very fast read and had me guessing till the end. I will be reading more of this series.

Next was,
Finger Lickin' Fifteen by Janet Evanovich. Not one of her best, but I did laugh out loud a few times.

Lastly, I am finishing up [error_in_url=http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1861196.All_The_Pretty_Girls]All the Pretty Girls by J.T. Ellison. It's not the best book, but it has been a fast and fluffy read that I don't regret. I might read the next in the series.

WingNut
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Posted: 11/26/2012 8:48:00 AM
The good and bad of my Nook HD+ tablet is that finding new books to read or put on my Good Reads "to be read" list is growing daily. I'll be dead before I finish them all. That doesn't count the 8 or so magazines I've now added to my list of reading thanks to our library system's hooking up with the Zinio's "newstand".

This is Where I Leave You: I was initially put off by the pretty graphic sexual description at the beginning of the book. I was also unsure I wanted to read a book where it was obvious pretty early on that EVERYONE was miserable and they were going to spend the week showin the rest of their family just how much worse THEIR life was compared to the others. I'm glad I stuck it out though. I found myself becoming more absorbed with each page. By the end, I was actually happy with the choice he made. I could envision that it was a temporary choice. He needed some time. I'm looking forward to reading some of this author's other books.

Almost forgot to add that I'm listening to The Hobbit in anticipating of the movie in two weeks

I'm currently reading both Yarn Harlot and The Black Stallion Returns.


Joy


Brandie775
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Posted: 11/26/2012 9:24:38 AM


This week I am reading a YA book, Shadow and Bone. It's pretty good so far.


started, "Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet", and my friend told me not to bother, so I put it down


I enjoyed this one too. It was a little slow to start but I really enjoyed it.



batya
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Posted: 11/26/2012 9:38:53 AM

Sometimes I wonder if I read so much and so fast that I can't even remember what I've read.



This is me. I don't do goodreads b/c I am a dinosaur, but I have been keeping word docs of my books for years and I love it. I see what trends I've followed (fiction, non fiction, which months I read more, etc). Then, when people ask for recs, I can go back and see which ones I gave *** so I can tell people which books made an impression on me or which ones I want to find used to buy and pass on to my sister or kids that I took out of the library and don't own. Like (powderhorn!) The Night Circus!


OK. Newbie. This is how it works. If your post consists of 80% sanity, 10% stupidity and 10% all kinds of crazy, we immediately focus on the 20% b/c it discredits the 80%.




Lumo
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Posted: 11/26/2012 9:41:47 AM
I finished The Long Walk: The True Story of a Trek to Freedom by Slavomir Rawicz -- it was okay. I wasn't really crazy about his writing style, although as I understood it, he dictated most of the book. The story was pretty good, and he had me *right* up until the end -- I won't spoil it, but I'll just say that it made me question the entire story he'd just told.

I also read Lincoln's Last Hours by Charles Leale. Was a really quick read -- don't know as I'd call it a 'book' per se. Interesting first-hand account from someone who was actually there.

Currently reading The Kennedy Detail: JFK's Secret Service Agents Break Their Silence by Gerald Blaine. I'm just barely into it, so I haven't decided on it yet one way or another.


---
Kelly


bgpa
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Posted: 11/26/2012 9:55:17 AM
New to this thread...thank you for starting it!
I spend a lot of time with audio books, because my job requires a lot of daily travel.
Last week I started Emperor Mollusk versus The Sinister Brain by A. Lee Martinez. I normally love his books, but this one is absolutely dragging for me. It is rare for me to not finish a book, but this might have to go on that list. Emperor Mollusk is a hyperintelligent invertebrate life form who is retiring from taking over the world when he encounters another life form who is seeking to gain the universe. It's VERY hard to follow.
I recently finished Spellbound by Larry Correia. Very good sequel to Hard Magic . Both are dark fantasy novels, set in 1930's America. A bit steampunky, with lots of explosions and excitement.


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Posted: 11/26/2012 10:07:51 AM
I am currently reading Still Life With Murder , by P. B. Ryan. It is the first in the Nell Sweeney Mystery Series. Not bad so far.


Joy







Maite
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Posted: 11/26/2012 10:19:56 AM
This week I read The #1 Ladies's Detective Agency by Alexander McCall Smith (Dynalady, I see you're late to the party and so am I ). It was really cute, and fluffy, and held my attention. I am now onto the second book in the series: Tears of the Giraffe.

I also read City of Bones by Cassandra Clare. It's a guilty pleasure YA novel. I heard that the movie is coming out, with Aidan Turner and Jonathan Rhys Meyers, so I just had to read the book. It was enjoyable. I am on a vampire/werewolf kick, with this series and watching Being Human (UK) on Netflix!


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creativeflmom
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Posted: 11/26/2012 10:43:17 AM
I am currently reading "World War Z" yes I know I am behind in times but I wanted to read it before the movie came out next summer. It is my break from school books and my assignments.

I am also reading "The Presidents Club: Insides the Worlds most exclusive Fraternity" by Nancy Gibbs and Michael Duffy. It is about the relationships between past and present Presidents and how they bridge the gap between parties to help one another (some better then others). So far it is really interesting. It is a huge book so I will be reading this for a while.

Last week I finished "The Liberators" it was about the discovery and liberation of concentrations camps during WWII told by the Americans that were actually there. It was very well written and incredibly haunting what these soldiers saw and had to deal with. I definitely recommend this book to anyone who is interested in WWII and the Holocaust.



The pea who used to be CreativeMommy2Two

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Posted: 11/26/2012 12:04:10 PM
I just read Fifth Avenue, 5 A.M.: Audrey Hepburn, Breakfast at Tiffany's, and the Dawn of the Modern Woman by Sam Wasson.

It's about the making of the movie of Breakfast at Tiffany's. It was interesting to read about the behind the scenes decisions that were made. I have not read the actual book, but have it on my to read list. Like so many movies made today, the two are nothing alike!

It was fascinating to read how she was the cross-over from 50's housewife or bimbo in the movies. They made her a likeable call girl.

I enjoyed reading it on my kindle because many names in the industry were mentioned. I liked highlighting a name and doing a search on wikipedia (I know not entirely reliable) and reading more background information. I think I would have read it in half the time.

I just started Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter by Seth Grahame-Smith. I've only read one chapter. I thought I would read it because I really want to see the movie that is out right now about Lincoln.

Wanted to add I really enjoyed Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet.

batya
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Posted: 11/26/2012 12:17:55 PM

I just read Fifth Avenue, 5 A.M.: Audrey Hepburn, Breakfast at Tiffany's, and the Dawn of the Modern Woman by Sam Wasson.



I read this a few years back and liked it as well.


OK. Newbie. This is how it works. If your post consists of 80% sanity, 10% stupidity and 10% all kinds of crazy, we immediately focus on the 20% b/c it discredits the 80%.




~Lauren~
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Posted: 11/26/2012 12:22:44 PM
Mary Ann, the Dovekeepers was a fantastic book, but it took place in around 35 BC, not 1100.





Any man who thinks he can be happy and prosperous by letting the government take care of him better take a closer look at the American Indian - Henry Ford

Mystie
Dancing to the end of love.

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Posted: 11/26/2012 12:36:26 PM
I am almost done with The Rose Garden by Susanna Kearsley. I read her book The Winter Sea a year or two ago and really liked it, so I thought I'd give this one a shot. It's very good, too. I'd call it "historical romance for the thinking woman." I mean, it's all the ingredients of classic chick lit, but her writing is what elevates it to something more. Definitely the kind of book that sweeps you away to another place and time.

I'm also reading Rose Madder by Stephen King. It's not a topic I usually like to read about (abused wife) but so far it's pulled me in. It's nice to read a King book written from a woman's point of view--he hasn't written enough of those, IMO.


Janelle



mom2luke
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Posted: 11/26/2012 1:01:35 PM
This week I read Divergent and really enjoyed it. I have not downloaded the next in the series but I will soon.

I have also started Life of Pi because I have been wanting to read it for a very long time but another book always seemed to get in the way. Well, now I want to see the movie.

I am also reading The Danger Box. It is a Young Adult selection - this one because my son has a book report due on this next week and I want to be able to verify his work...but that is another story!

I too want to add that I really really enjoyed Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet.

mom2luke
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Posted: 11/26/2012 1:01:35 PM
This week I read Divergent and really enjoyed it. I have not downloaded the next in the series but I will soon.

I have also started Life of Pi because I have been wanting to read it for a very long time but another book always seemed to get in the way. Well, now I want to see the movie.

I am also reading The Danger Box. It is a Young Adult selection - this one because my son has a book report due on this next week and I want to be able to verify his work...but that is another story!

I too want to add that I really really enjoyed Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet.

Carey Ayn
why

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Posted: 11/26/2012 1:09:41 PM
This week I finished World War Z as well. It was an entertaining read. If you haven't read it, it is a collection of various accounts/ vignettes that are told after the Zombie Wars have hit the world. Since it is presented as excerpts from a variety of interviews with survivors, the entire narration takes on this dry and somber tone that gets a little redundant, but overall, I would recommend it.

I also read the fourth book in the "First Grave" series, Fourth Grave under my Feet. If you want an easy, humorous and a tiny bit sexy read, these are for you. Very enjoyable! Can't wait for the next one.

I just started Crossed last night, the second in the Matched series of YA dystopian lit.



kckckc
StuckOnPeas

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Posted: 11/26/2012 1:10:44 PM
I read two books this week.

Red Rain by R.L. Stine. Stine is the author of the Goosebumps series for children. I didn't particularly like this one, but that may be because I am not much of a horror story reader. This one seemed like he had taken one of his children's books and added some sex and gore. To me, it was lacking in something, but I'm not sure what it was.

Flight Behavior by Barbara Kingsolver. This is Kingsolver's latest. I thought it was good, but not great. The characters were very predictable and the environmental message was a little heavy handed, but I still enjoyed the story.




kellybelly77
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Posted: 11/26/2012 1:14:16 PM

I just started Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter by Seth Grahame-Smith. I've only read one chapter. I thought I would read it because I really want to see the movie that is out right now about Lincoln.


There are currently 2 movies out about Lincoln and both are based on books! The one you are reading, and the movie is the same name, and the movie Lincoln which is based on a book called Team of Rivals.

I am currently reading Team of Rivals, but I already cheated and saw the movie!

Once I finish that up I have about 15 items on my list to read!


Kelly

wendy.merrill
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Posted: 11/26/2012 2:08:59 PM
I just finished reading World Without End by Ken Follet for the second time. It's the sequel to Pillars of the Earth, both of these are on the top of my favorites list.
I just started The Winter Sea, only a few pages in but I think I'm going to like it.


I am reading THE PHYSICIAN BY NOAH GORDON . Its set in the 1100's and its about an orphaned boy who has becomes a doc. Its pretty good so far.


This is next on my list!

Mimima
Stay Gold, Ponyboy

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Posted: 11/26/2012 2:42:39 PM
MommyofTriplets - I enjoyed John Taylor's book very much. It's not the best book I've read, but definitely a keeper and one I'll re-read.

I am working on "The Fellowship of the Ring" by JRR Tolkein - I've never gotten through it before, and thankfully I'm enjoying it this time through.

I also read a collection of essays by a woman who is Orthodox like me, "Close to Home" by Molly Sabourin about mothering (little kids more than the age of my kids now)

I also read "The Metamorphosis" by Franz Kafka. My son will have to read it this year for school, and I'd not read it since HIgh School, so I picked it up. I skimmed the essays in the edition that he had, they weren't that fabulous, but the story is good. It was much sadder than I remembered, I think in my memory I focused more on the weirdness of the set-up rather than the effects of the change.

I'm also working on an Elizabeth Gouge "Green Dolphin Street."


~Mimi
"She is too fond of books, and it has turned her brain." - Louisa May Alcott

Cutesuzyq
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Posted: 11/26/2012 3:16:18 PM
I see several that are on my to read list and a few that I need to check out.

Last week I read (All of them by Patricia Briggs):
Bone Crossed
Silver Borne
Cry Wolf
Hunting Grounds

I'm currently reading Fair Game by Patricia Briggs

I have Perdition House by Kathryn R. Wall sitting here waiting for me to start and River Marked by Patricia Briggs waiting for me to pick up at the library tomorrow.

I just recently discovered Patricia Briggs' Mercedes Thompson series and really enjoyed reading them so I've been trying to work my way through the whole series.

I'm a little OCD when it comes to reading series...have to start at te first one and read through in order they were written.


Suzanne
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Tommygirl
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Posted: 11/26/2012 7:38:50 PM
I read Between Shades of Gray which I bought for my 17 y/o dd at her high school book fair. She read it and insisted that I read it because she was dying to talk to someone about it. It was a quick, powerful read. Definitely a recommended book!

The I read Karen Kingsbury's new book The Bridge . It was also a quick read. It was light, fluffy, and predictable.

Now I have started Only Time Will Tell by Jeffrey Archer. Only about a third of the way in but it is good so far. It's a series so I'm hoping its a good one!

ETA: Between Shades of Gray has nothing to do with the Fifty Shades of Gray trilogy. Just thought I'd make that little disclaimer!
It deals with Stalin's treatment of the Lithuanians. It is historical fiction.

IScrapCrap
StuckOnPeas

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Posted: 11/26/2012 8:00:08 PM

There are currently 2 movies out about Lincoln and both are based on books! The one you are reading, and the movie is the same name, and the movie Lincoln which is based on a book called Team of Rivals.


I know. I was kidding when I posted earlier. That's why I put this guy at the end ---

I'm not sure I mentioned in another thread about reading The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison. A few years ago I tried reading Beloved. I tried so hard to understand and like that book, I didn't want to read any others by this author. I'm glad I read it; it was beautifully written and so haunting.

ETA: Batya the first book you read sounds very interesting. I've heard Joanna Brooks name in passing. I find it hard to be a Mormon and a true feminist. I think she has to draw a very fine line so she doesn't get in trouble. That part about Marie Osmond? That is so not a Mormon thing, that is all her.

sheepjammies
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Posted: 11/27/2012 8:02:58 PM
I finished "The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry" which was good…sometimes her writing had me going back and reading certain paragraphs severals times. It may be that there are many cultural references and phrases that are not familiar to us in the US, but common in the UK.

I'm now almost finished with "Tell the Wolves I'm Home". This has been a complete page turner for me. I grew up in the 80's and 90's when HIV/AIDS was unfamiliar territory and people were fearful--this book takes me right there in history. Loving it.

I'm really surprised that everyone is loving "Night Circus" so much. I couldn't wait to read it and flew through 75% of it and then kept thinking--sheesh, on with it!! I was so disappointed in the ending I could have thrown the book across the room! hahaha! I wish I would have read it for a book club because I just didn't get the ending and I would have loved talking about it with someone. I just felt so unsatisfied!

TXMary
That's my island!

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Posted: 11/27/2012 8:20:36 PM
I'm reading America's Boy by Wade Rouse. It's a memoir of a gay man who grew up in the 1960's in the Southwest Missouri Ozarks. My sister recommended it to me and left me a few of his books. It's fast reading. Funny and sad. I'm not that far into it, but I'm really enjoying it.

I love this part of the Amazon description:

Growing up "different" in the rural Ozarks - a place that made the fellas from Deliverance look like the Jonas Brothers - wasn't easy for a little boy like Wade Rouse, a Winnie-the-Pooh children's clothing model with a love of pageants, pie and pretty ascots.

While country schoolmates sported crew cuts and dreamed of being farmers, Wade sported a feathered 'do and dreamed of being Robbie Benson. Wade's whacky family didn't make growing up any easier: Wade's father, an extroverted engineer, insisted on calling everyone "honey" even male gas station attendants and his mother, a chatty nurse, never stopped talking.

And Wade's All-American older brother excelled at rural activities, like hunting and fishing, that Wade hated. Every summer, Wade's eccentric kin packed their clothes in garbage bags and drove to their log cabin on Sugar Creek in the Ozarks. And it was amidst this simple beauty that Wade found refuge from his everyday struggle to fit in-until a sudden, terrible accident took his brother's life and changed everything. Afraid to lose the love of his remaining family, Wade chose to bury not only his brother but also his identity and burgeoning sexuality, and forget them for a very long time.



freecharlie
Trying to think of a new title

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Posted: 11/27/2012 8:37:46 PM

I read Between Shades of Gray which I bought for my 17 y/o dd at her high school book fair. She read it and insisted that I read it because she was dying to talk to someone about it. It was a quick, powerful read. Definitely a recommended book!


This one is sitting on my nightstand begging to be next.


Tribbey: I believe, as long as Justice Dreifort is intolerant toward gays, lesbians, blacks, unions, women, poor people, and the first, fourth, fifth, and ninth amendments, I will remain intolerant toward him! [to Ainsley] Nice meeting you
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