So my dd has a cavity but the dentist is not filling it*** edit to add

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Posted 1/20/2013 by Kluski in NSBR Board
 

Kluski
AncestralPea

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Posted: 1/20/2013 6:09:31 PM
She is 11. This is her first cavity on a tooth that is not completely thru her gum. He thinks it may have had a defect in it and since it is still soft he is hoping extra fluoride will close it up. he plans to wait and see what happens at the next appointment.

I am not sure what to think. I am not sure if this can really happen or if he was just trying to calm my dd down.

Any thoughts?

**edit to add
He said on a scale of 1-10 it was a 1. He suggested the fluoride mouthwash.
Thank you all for your thoughts and experiences.

My dd brushes twice a day and flosses regularly but not daily. I honestly think we failed her bc we allow her to drink bottled water. I have convinced DH that she needs to drink the tap water that is treated with fluoride in addition to the mouthwash. Hoping for better news in July!


Dee

julieberg
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Posted: 1/20/2013 6:17:43 PM


That is something our dentist would do and I remember my dentist telling me that as a kid. He would tell me to "brush it out". I would brush like crazy. I think it is good that the dentist isn't immediately going to fill it to make $$$.


that is not completely thru her gum


???

wildcatksu
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Posted: 1/20/2013 6:20:56 PM
Our dentist takes a wait and see approach on cavities. He has recommended filling them right away when they are between teeth.

Is it hurting? If it isn't, I'd be fine waiting.

Kluski
AncestralPea

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Posted: 1/20/2013 6:22:36 PM

that is not completely thru her gum



It is a 12yr molar that is only half way thru the gum.


Dee

angel97701
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Posted: 1/20/2013 6:24:24 PM
Maybe not completely through the enamel? I would also get her the fluoride rinse and have her rinse twice a day. We use Act at our house b/c my boys are cavity prone.


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hergie
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Posted: 1/20/2013 6:47:00 PM
I think she means the tooth is not completely through the gum, not the cavity.

Gsquaredmom

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Posted: 1/20/2013 6:49:06 PM
It is worth trying. Did he give her a home prescription flouride treatment? It might work. She must be diligent about it, though.



WillowJane
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Posted: 1/20/2013 7:50:42 PM
Our pediatric dentist told us two years ago that new research shows the less trauma a child's teeth receives provides a path for stronger adult/permanent teeth. He would not drill unless he absolutely had to and even then it was minimal with very direct fluoride and enamel treatments afterward.

Considering how my adult teeth turned out after all the things my dentist did when I was younger it's a wonder I don't have full dentures top and bottom.

If the tooth is not hurting your DD, I would trust the dentist on this one. If pain sets in, the dentist needs to know so he can do something.

P.S. Don't forget to floss!

scrapping buckeye
StuckOnPeas

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Posted: 1/20/2013 8:08:58 PM
I discovered a while ago that dentistry has a level of subjectivity to it. Some dentist will fill a cavity even if it is just little and not very bad. Others will wait to see if it gets worse. I personally like the wait and see approach, most small cavities are not an emergency situation.

One time I went to a new dentist that wanted to replace all of my silver fillings and said they were bad. Some of them weren't even that old. I went for a 2nd opinion and none of them needed replacing. I'd personally be more wary of a dentist that did want to fill a small filling like that on a new tooth.




pennyring
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Posted: 1/20/2013 8:12:16 PM
Maybe it's not a "real" cavity? I have quite a few "soft spots" on my teeth. The dentist wanted to fill them all! (Something like 3 or 4.)

I said, "Hey, hey, hey, wait. How did I get 3 cavities between the last time I saw you and now?"

He says, "Oh well, these aren't exactly cavities, but they might become cavities if we don't fill them."

Screw that! How about I just take care of my teeth, and you keep your drill away from my mouth.

I haven't been back to that guy. I'd been suspicious before that his staff was billing insurance fraudulently, and that visit did me in. I was so completely pissed when I left.




finaledition
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Posted: 1/20/2013 9:48:41 PM
My dd dentist spotted a couple small ones on her X-ray. He also suggested using a fluoride/cavity rinse and he hold off putting in a filling till it was necessary.
He knows my kids regularly visit him every six month so there's no chance there will be no follow thru should it become worse.
We love this dentist, he's always taken a conservative approach.
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WillowJane
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Posted: 1/20/2013 9:59:55 PM
    My dd brushes twice a day and flosses regularly but not daily. I honestly think we failed her bc we allow her to drink bottled water. I have convinced DH that she needs to drink the tap water that is treated with fluoride in addition to the mouthwash. Hoping for better news in July!


You did not fail her. You can overdo it on fluoride. If your tap water has too much fluoride (like ours does) can and will streak or pit the permanent teeth - a condition called flurosis. The dentists in our area recommend kids drink bottled water until permanent teeth come through.

Swordscrapping
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Posted: 1/20/2013 10:06:34 PM
My 12 yr old ds's dentist prescribed a flouride treatment to use for 30 days and wanted him to be sure to drink milk at his visit a couple of weeks ago. I also bought Act rinse.

I'm ok with waiting til the next visit and the $8 for the presciption is way easier on the wallet than jumping right to a filling that may not be needed.

We had well water most of his childhood, so I understand your concern over bottled water...of course at school the water fountain has tap water so who knows.

melissa
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Posted: 1/20/2013 10:28:00 PM
My daughter had the same thing. She had a tooth that was erupting and it seemed to have a cavity, but the dentist wasn't sure if it was a deformation of the tooth.

I honestly cannot remember what happened in the end. Dd had a great deal of dental work from 9-13. Many of her primary teeth became anklyosed (means they essentially took root, similar to adult teeth) so she had to have primary teeth extracted, so it was always one thing or another. I do remember she had a cavity filled during that time frame, but I don't know if it was that tooth later on or not.



Nicole in TX
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Posted: 1/21/2013 7:01:15 AM
It is nice to see a dentist take a conservative approach.

I think most people don't know that enamel can come and go and the tooth can repair itself if the cavity is minor.



melanell
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Posted: 1/21/2013 7:06:23 AM
Years ago...probably 6 or so, we were told DS had the start of 2 cavities in between 2 teeth.

We were told to pay extra attention to that area and to be sure he did use his fluoride rinse every day.

In the beginning they did take an extra x-ray of those teeth to make sure the cavity wasn't getting worse, and eventually they went away. He no longer has any extra x-rays, and it's been a few years since they have even noted that he had any beginning cavities any more.

So the "wait and see while giving TLC" approach worked well for him in that regard.



kellybelly77
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Posted: 1/21/2013 9:23:06 AM
My dentist took the same approach with me several years ago. I had a tiny cavity on the tip of one of my molars. He suggested just waiting to see what happened since it was so small. He also said to brush multiple times a day. We watched that spot for something like 2 years. It eventually had to be filled though.


Kelly

Kluski
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Posted: 1/21/2013 9:13:40 PM
Thank you all so much for sharing. I love this place!


Dee
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