My 13 y.o, DD has broken my heart this week. (Help me feel better, please).

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Posted 1/31/2013 by shamrockpea in NSBR Board
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IleneTell
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Posted: 1/31/2013 9:52:06 PM
I would definitely follow up with a conversation about what's going on with her, and why she feels that way. I guess it's not abnormal for teenagers to have those kinds of feelings, but they usually stem from something. And it would be nice to have a follow up and show her you care about what she thinks and feels, and if there are issues, that you're willing to work on them.



Lumo
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Posted: 1/31/2013 9:55:44 PM
I think that's pretty normal.

And I'd also expect she'll have moved on to something else in a month or two.


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PEArfect
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Posted: 1/31/2013 9:56:14 PM
I would talk to her and get more details as to why she feels that way and why you are just now hearing about it.

I have a 13yo dd and she has spouted off before about being stressed, or wanting some time to herself, but she's never mentioned being unhappy all the time while at home. She has two younger sisters, so I can understand her wanting time to herself.


Jen


julieberg
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Posted: 1/31/2013 9:56:27 PM


My 23 yo (college educated) ds says that to me - he wants to move out of the suburbs and into the city (Chicago). At 23 I expect him to say that. Hearing that from a 13 yo would be hard.

She needs to give you a better answer as to what is bothering her so much. Does she have friends, is she having problems at school, etc.? Issues may need to be addressed.

I do remember my dd telling me at 13 that she was moving to CA and going to college. This was "the plan" which her best bud at the time. After a year it was onto something else. This, however, wasn't said out of anger.

Kids are so hard....

FrenchToast
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Posted: 1/31/2013 10:03:21 PM
Wow, I'm sorry, I can imagine how hurtful that is. I would just remind her how lucky she is to have "all this".



moveablefeast
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Posted: 1/31/2013 10:07:33 PM
In eighth grade, my best friend took pieces of paper, counted out one by one the days till she turned eighteen, and taped the paper to her walls. She would cross them off one by one with a red pen.

She eventually gave up that trope and went on to something else.

It represented her trying to figure out who she was and what she wanted in life. Her mom responded by being more and more controlling and that didn't go so well for any of them. I think my friend needed her mom's love and acceptance more than she heard it. Her mom was not a bad mom and I don't think you are either - bt mom and daughter were certainly speaking different languages.

Daughters eventually have to separate from their moms and sometimes that process is really dramatic. I think it can be a productive process or a destructive one, depending on how everybody handles it.

Just wishing you the best. I hope you can figure out what's going on.

Lisa Risser
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Posted: 1/31/2013 10:08:06 PM
Today must be the day of hormonal teenagers--hugs for you! They sure can be hurtful at times, probably more than they realize. No real advice, but I do love the saying "love me at my worst, because that is when I need it the most."


~~Lisa

freecharlie
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Posted: 1/31/2013 10:09:58 PM
At that age I was going to go to New York City and get out of my POS small town. There were days I "hated" my mom and couldn't wait to get away.

Now, I love the city I grew up in. I couldn't imagine living in NYC and I think my mother is the greatest person in my life.

While I might follow up with her, I'd also keep in mind that it seems pretty normal.


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ruppter
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Posted: 1/31/2013 10:14:58 PM
I am right there with you but my DD is 17. She has an app on her phone that is counting down for her (down to the second)! Haha! Try not to take it too personally! I'm sure you are a caring and loving mom...and your DD is probably a very sweet girl who is just taking out frustrations on you. Buckle your seat belt and settle in for a rough couple of years! I have faith that smooth sailing is in our futures though!


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Posted: 1/31/2013 10:18:17 PM
Actually that would piss me off & I would let her know that is was a disrespectful thing to say & she was being unappreciative of the things that were being provided for her. I would also tell her that she hurt your feelings.


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BEF2008
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Posted: 1/31/2013 10:18:45 PM
I'm sorry you are so sad. It must be very hurtful to hear that.

I'm just going to throw this out there because it was an experience I had and maybe it might be similar to yours and might help to shed some light. Please don't take offence; I don't know you or the situation so if this is wrong, I accept that I could be off base.

Is it possible that only one of you in your scenario that you describe ("we get along really well and we don't have any big fights" ) is happy? Sometimes when parents are super controlling and overly involved, they can't see the forest through the trees.

A friend of my DD's ended up living with us last summer because his ridiculously over-controlling mother finally broke him. He'd had enough and couldn't take it anymore and ran away. His mother called me, broken hearted, because she thought their life was perfect and couldn't possibly imagine why her son would leave. She spent FOUR HOURS on the phone with me, telling me how amazing and perfect she was as a mother and how he simply didn't appreciate it and she was heart broken that she had apparently raised a child who couldn't appreciate everything she did for him.

Suffice to say she was the most suffocating parent I've ever met. It worked for HER personally, but clearly not for her son. After hearing both sides of their stories, I strongly sided with the boy.

So like I said, I don't know any more about your situation than you are telling us but is it possible she feels like she has no control over her own life? To swing so completely the other way makes me wonder if she is lashing out at something or feels trapped.

Again, just a suggestion. Nothing personal here. I hope you are able to figure it out.

P.S. their family ultimately went to family therapy in order to really get to the bottom of their issues.

Maryland
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Posted: 1/31/2013 10:22:44 PM
I'm so sorry she is treating you like this. My friends 12 yr. old son is like that too. She is so stressed out. Hopefully your daughter is upset about something else and her life, and because you are her parent, the one who loves her the most, she feels "safe" taking it out on you.

I would try to talk to her about it. Be calm, and ask her what is upsetting her. If it is something you did, because by telling you it will help you understand her feelings. (not that I think it's because of you, but that may make her feel that she should tell you it's not you, it's something else). If this doesn't work, and after a couple weeks she doesn't get any better, than maybe try talking to the school counselor. Maybe she/he could give you ideas on what to do. Or make her come with you or talk to the counselor alone.

Again, so sorry you are going through this. I have a 13 yr. old 8th grader and I would be upset if she ever said something like that to my husband or I. I think many teens treat their parents the worst because they are "afraid" about the fact that they will soon be out of their parents house.


Dock Master
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Posted: 1/31/2013 10:23:03 PM
My 17 year old can't wait until she can leave too. She loves us, but she has wunderlust. She wants to travel and see the world, she has since she was about that age. There are times she can be quite harsh about it. She loves her family, but has the urge to spread her wings. Definitely have a chat with your DD and make sure all is well, but she may just have wunderlust.


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scoobers

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Posted: 1/31/2013 10:23:38 PM
Your daughter is completely normal. At some point every kid thinks that way - some just dont say it out loud. hitch up your skirts mom, the wild ride is just beginning but 'they' say that in her early 20’s your lovely, sweet daughter will magically return and her evil twin will be gone forever.

It's going to be okay.



IleneTell
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Posted: 1/31/2013 10:23:43 PM

Sometimes when parents are super controlling


I agree with that. When I was 17, I remember yelling at my dad that I couldn't wait to leave and go to college. And I meant it.

Which is why I think it's a good idea to have a conversation with her. By all means, tell her it hurt your feelings to hear her say that. But please do not tell her that it's inappropriate to say things like that or express how she feels! You want her to come to you and tell you how she feels so that if there's an issue, you have the opportunity to do something about it. She's giving you that opportunity, so take it. Ask her what she's upset about, ask her how you guys can work on it and fix it and make it better. Tell her you want her to be happy and you want to have a good relationship with her. Take her to therapy if you need to. See this as an opportunity and do something about it now.



Mystie
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Posted: 1/31/2013 10:29:29 PM
I'm not a mom but I have been a 13-year-old girl. I think you're taking what she's said WAY too much to heart, unless there's more to the story than what you've shared. It sounds to me like she was venting some teenage aggravation. I can remember those feelings, too, even though life at home wasn't bad at all. At 13, it feels like you're ready to be a grown-up, but that moment (that magical 18th birthday ) seems so far away! And of course there is still so much to learn.

I can understand your hurt, but I think you'll need to harden up a little, because there will be many more times that your DD will hurt your feelings--sometimes intentionally, sometimes not. Be a safe place where she can share her thoughts with you. She doesn't hate you, she is just figuring things out.


Janelle



CountryHam
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Posted: 1/31/2013 10:32:06 PM
I told my mother that once and her reply was that it made her happy. She said I would hope you are planning an independent life away from your parents and I would be worried if you were not getting anxious and excited and frustrated at times because you can anticipate making your own decisions. One thing my mother never did was let my teenage sass make her feel bad.

MetalDancer
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Posted: 1/31/2013 10:42:56 PM
My gosh, when I was that age, I thought I was so grown up (8th grade at my jr. high was the equivalent of a senior at the high school), my parents were dumb as a box of hammers and I couldn't wait to get out of that dinkums town I lived in. My dad is passed away now, my mom will be 80 in December and the older I got, the smarter they got. I only live an hour from home, but if I could move back there tomorrow, you would only see my dust as I went tearing out of this driveway!

I remember going off on my mom in a similar fashion and years later apologizing to her. We have such a wonderful relationship now. I know this won't help your hurt feelings, but this, too, shall pass. Hugs to you, Mom. If being a Mom was easy, Dad's would do it!


Lisa =^..^=

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crimsoncat05
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Posted: 1/31/2013 10:46:03 PM
Daughters eventually have to separate from their moms and sometimes that process is really dramatic. I think it can be a productive process or a destructive one, depending on how everybody handles it.



^^^^^ this is so true, moveablefeast! When I was a teenager, I was sooo sure that I knew everything, that my mom was clueless about 'real life' and 'being in love' and pretty much everything else. If she said something, I disagreed with it on principle. I didn't see my mom as a real, separate person outside of being my mom, if that makes sense- a person who had had life experiences, and who only wanted me to benefit from her experience. To me, it seemed controlling and that she was telling me what to do / what not to do, when I only wanted to experience things for myself.

For me, it took till I was in my mid-20s to see that my mom really did have my best interests at heart all those years, and to relate to her more as a peer / friend. (even though I did have to go through those experiences- first love, etc.- to learn things from them, no matter how much she may have wanted to protect me from the hurt.) When I was in my mid-20s I finally understood what she had been trying to do for me was to spare me (not the best words, but that's the best I can think of) hurt and disappointment out of concern and love, not because she was trying to be controlling. (although I think there'll always be some of that 'mother knows best' in our relationship- I'm just better able to deal with it as an adult.)

I know, too, that sometimes during my teens I was sooo hormonal and over-emotional (I had pretty severe PMS) that it seemed like I wanted to just punch the wall, some days, for no reason at all... there was just that much confused emotion swirling around in me. I'm sure I must have lashed out at my mom more than once during those times, because she was probably trying to help, and I couldn't see how she could possibly understand TO help. Maybe your daughter is going through something similar.

I don't know what's going on with your daughter, but I wanted to relate my own experiences as a daughter. None of what happened means I didn't love my mom; it was just a difficult time for me, trying to find / exert my own identity and figure out what the heck was going on and figuring out who I was. Good luck to you both.




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redboots
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Posted: 1/31/2013 11:08:45 PM
She's 13. I think the sentiments she expressed are normal for that age.

What I don't think is normal is your outsized reaction. You are being really dramatic here, especially questioning her mental health. Keep being so over the top and you just might find that your daughter won't want to speak to you when she's older.


dreamerpea
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Posted: 1/31/2013 11:20:10 PM
Mom, you realize why she wants to move to England right????

Is she a One Direction Fan? MY DD 14 says the same thing...ugh...

I also have a 30yr. old and a 24 yr. old.

Let me tell you. Tonight we had dinner with the older DD...she saw how 14 yr. old was acting and said something I'd thought I'd never hear.
Mom, how do you do it? You are the most selfless person I know. (Shocker!)

The 24 yr. old couldn't wait to get out of the house. Until he left for 3 yrs. and realized how much he missed home. He moved back for a bit and kept saying how great it was! LOL He's married and expecting his 1st child. (and not living with us)

So Mom, put on your big girl panties and stop moping around.

I will bet you she may say worse things in the future.



mncmom
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Posted: 1/31/2013 11:32:06 PM
I know exactly how you feel. My DD said that many times, and it does break your heart.
I can tell you that now, at age 20 and away at school, she can't wait to come home for occasional weekends, and she calls or texts almost every day. This from a kid who couldn't wait to get away from us!
It takes age, maturity and a taste of life sometimes before they realize how blessed they are to have the family they have.
Hang in there, stay strong. It's perfectly normal, but very hurtful for a mom.

mncmom
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Posted: 1/31/2013 11:32:09 PM
I know exactly how you feel. My DD said that many times, and it does break your heart.
I can tell you that now, at age 20 and away at school, she can't wait to come home for occasional weekends, and she calls or texts almost every day. This from a kid who couldn't wait to get away from us!
It takes age, maturity and a taste of life sometimes before they realize how blessed they are to have the family they have.
Hang in there, stay strong. It's perfectly normal, but very hurtful for a mom.

mncmom
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Posted: 1/31/2013 11:32:12 PM
I know exactly how you feel. My DD said that many times, and it does break your heart.
I can tell you that now, at age 20 and away at school, she can't wait to come home for occasional weekends, and she calls or texts almost every day. This from a kid who couldn't wait to get away from us!
It takes age, maturity and a taste of life sometimes before they realize how blessed they are to have the family they have.
Hang in there, stay strong. It's perfectly normal, but very hurtful for a mom.

lucyg819
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Posted: 1/31/2013 11:53:49 PM
OP, I will try to say this gently. If you're taking your DD's fairly mild teen angst THIS hard now, you are never going to survive her entire adolescence.

She's a teenager. They're angry, confused, and hormonal by nature. Don't listen to a word she says. Certainly don't take it to heart.

Hopefully she'll turn nice again in about 5-8 years. Mine did, and at the time I thought it was a freakin' miracle.


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sunny 5
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Posted: 2/1/2013 12:00:06 AM
I recommend a book for you:"get out of my life, but first could you drive cheryl and me to the mall?"

parenting the teenager. remember, you can't control her mouth, you can control your reaction.

I-95
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Posted: 2/1/2013 12:11:42 AM

OP, I will try to say this gently. If you're taking your DD's fairly mild teen angst THIS hard now, you are never going to survive her entire adolescence.

She's a teenager. They're angry, confused, and hormonal by nature. Don't listen to a word she says. Certainly don't take it to heart.

Hopefully she'll turn nice again in about 5-8 years. Mine did, and at the time I thought it was a freakin' miracle.


^^^THIS^^^

My DD went through the 'I hate you, and I can't wait to leave' routine too. She is a natural born drama queen so I let most of it just roll off. One day she was doing her drama and planning her exit strategy, so I went and got a calender and started Xing off the days!! She looked at it and said 'But I thought you loved me'. I said I did, but I was tired of the drama, and we were stuck with each other for a few more years so we should figure out how to make it work. She hasn't mentioned it since, and she didn't leave when she was 18 either....where did I go wrong? I'm pretty sure your DD will work her way through this stage too.

SoCalLoneScrapper
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Posted: 2/1/2013 12:36:44 AM

OP, I will try to say this gently. If you're taking your DD's fairly mild teen angst THIS hard now, you are never going to survive her entire adolescence


That is exactly what I was thinking.




blinks14
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Posted: 2/1/2013 1:18:12 AM
I was a pretty angry, sometimes lonely, often depressed teenager. And I said things like this to my mom all the time. All the time.

It's hard not to take it personally. But she will grow up. And out of this thing they call adolescence.

TexasBorn
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Posted: 2/1/2013 1:51:51 AM
My granddaughter is 12 soon to be 13. She lives with my daughter and her brother. About once month she will call and want to come spend the night.
"Her Mom is just an old meany". She comes over and stays one night and she's ready to go back home. My husband loves it when she stays because she is so gullible. My kids were not allowed to say they hated anybody and unless it was absolutely necessary I stayed out of their battles. Didn't believe in grounding for every little thing and while they could not talk back to us they were allowed to state their opinion. They have both turned out OK. Took the youngest a little longer to grow up but she's heading in the right direction. The granddaughter is hers so it's payback time

grammanisi
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Posted: 2/1/2013 1:56:12 AM
I have been in your shoes, more than once. Just try to remember that its the hormones talking!


Denise
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MrsGarzzzza
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Posted: 2/1/2013 2:05:40 AM


Been there, done that ...not easy, but you have great advice here!

I wish you luck and a peaceful home!


ETA: auto-correct, shoot!











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Nicole in TX
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Posted: 2/1/2013 2:23:12 AM
That is normal. She is hormonal. Even she doesn't understand herself and her emotions right now. Give her love when she needs it and back off when she wants to be alone. She will be OK.

The other side of the coin could be living in your basement until she is 40 and smoking pot and playing video games.



Sukkii
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Posted: 2/1/2013 2:44:19 AM
It's very normal, when I was 13 I often told my mum I was leaving home at 16 and taking my dad with me It must have hurt mum at the time but once I was 17 or 18 we became so much closer and even closer when I moved out and had kids.

I think it was Lucy who said if you are heartbroken about words like this then you need to grow a thicker skin, absolutely! Teenage girls can be monsters but normally they revert back to the sweet, loving girls we knew

Ask her if anything is troubling her but do it when you are in the car or having casual time together. I suggest not making a big thing of it and demanding answers and saying how heartbroken you are. I am not saying you would do that but just dont make a big deal of it. I am sure you and DD will be fine...... eventually

gar
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Posted: 2/1/2013 2:56:09 AM
I'm sure it is a hormonal response and said without any awareness of how hurtful it is to us when kids say things like that.

My nephew repeatedly told his parents he couldn't understand why they led such mundane, dreary lives (in his opinion of course!!) and had it politely explained to him that those humdrum lives paid for his education, activities, clothes etc etc. Kids just don't get it at that age, is what I'm saying.

She's very young and while I'm pretty sure it was a grandiose statement it wouldn't hurt to have another chat and sound her out a bit more...is there anything worrying her, any reason to really be unhappy, any problems that you can help solve?

Hang in there



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Gsquaredmom

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Posted: 2/1/2013 3:37:11 AM
Normal. And good job. Your goal as a parent is to raise a child with the confidence and independence to leave home.



Really Red
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Posted: 2/1/2013 4:41:27 AM
I get OP's reaction. It is intense, but this is such a SHOCK the first time it happens. OP, I swear you may look back on this with sadness and/or understanding, but never with the shock you now feel.

Your DD is normal. It is normal to say those things. Even though my DDs haven't said them, I'd bet you that they've thought them, which is maybe worse! I don't know if your DD is dramatic or not, but I remember thinking the same thing when I was a kid. I did move away, but I am back

Talk to her about what she likes about the UK. Offer to go on vacation with her there. It IS pretty cool. Be positive with her. Maybe that will work, maybe not. Wallowing, like we moms often want to do, will not.

I'm sorry your DD said it to you. I've had a hard time with my own DD at times and I really really sympathize. But don't make it into a mountain. It really is a molehill.


Andrea

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Julee
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Posted: 2/1/2013 5:11:12 AM
"That sounds so exciting! How will you make this happen? What are your plans for getting there? I'd love to help you. We can start looking at colleges or study programs. There might be exchange student opportunities we can help you get into. We can look for jobs you can start working to start putting away some money. Please let me know if I can help you in any way. Your dream sounds so cool and I'm so excited for your plans!"


=)Julee

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Kelpea
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Posted: 2/1/2013 5:17:41 AM
Normal. It just hurts some moms' feelings more than others.

When my DD started that foolishness, my bff, a realtor, too us (along with her own daughter) to a DUMP rental property in the area. We told our girls that's what they could afford, if they moved out at 18 with no thought of their future (college). It was a shack with one bedroom, which we told them they would have to share.



zoeybug
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Posted: 2/1/2013 5:21:29 AM
First if all, great big ((hug)). I know your feelings are really hurt. I have two teenage boys and a 'tween girl and I love them dearly and have a good relationship with them.

Here's what I think: she's thirteen and in 8th grade. I've known a lot of teenagers, been one myself and they tend to lean on the dramatic side from time to time , even the good ones . In a way, it's good because she seems motivated ( not sure if she'll make it to Paris ) to have an interesting life. It also sounds like you've given her a great life and she doesn't have a clue how good it is.
I would really try not to over react ( and this will be hard - my kids can jerk my heart strings especially my girl) at least in front of her and just buckle up, she's probably got more coming for you! I have no doubt she's a good kid, not into drugs or anything but even "good kids" are moody teenagers. Be thankful for what she is, she sounds wonderful, be grateful she's ambitious and hang in there. Also, does she do her laundry yet or clean the bathrooms or anything like that? I mean if she needs to get away "from all this" give her something to get away from.
Hang in there !
Libby
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kimberly38
Ancient Ancestor of Pea

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Posted: 2/1/2013 5:26:53 AM
Maybe do the flip side.

Get a calendar and start tracking the days yourself. Say to her, "Oh, well, after your statement, I started to think of what life would be like when you were out of the house? Name a few simple things that you can do when she is not there. Less wash, maker her room into your craft room, sitting room, office, whatever, etc., so I thought I would count down the days also. Except put little smiley faces on your calendar! And actually count down the days. List by number. I don't know how many days it is, but let's say, 3254....start with that and each day go down a number. Act happy! Every so often, say, "Only so many more days until you are 18! and smile.

Your daughter will get exactly how you felt when she feels the same way.

But, like others have stated, if you feel this way now, you will never survive the time until she turns 18.

I have two girls, now ages 20 and 14. My twenty year old was like your daughter. She now calls me almost every day! My 14 year old is going thru some things and I don't think she ever thinks about leaving! lol...

Hugs.

Christine58
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Posted: 2/1/2013 5:36:47 AM
I would not be worried about her mental health unless she has given you other reasons to be concerned.

Turn this around...ask her where she would like to go and why...engage her in a great discussion about going to college etc in other countries...instead of being "hurt" have some great discussions about her desires. It's probably a passing fad but embrace her inner drive to explore other places etc.

She's 13.....kids that age say really stupid hurtful things....she's trying to be independent and may have a real desire to not leave but explore. It's really ok....



Some people only dream of angels, I have held one in my arms.





TinCin
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Posted: 2/1/2013 5:39:26 AM
I wouldn't worry too much about it, the teen years are tough and they can be heart breakers one minute ans sweet as pie the next. Maybe discuss it when you are both feeling better. I have to say my standard answer to a remark like that from one of mine would have been along the lines of "what makes you think you're the only one counting the days?" Both if mine told me that at least once and neither one left until well after 18.


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slkmommy
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Posted: 2/1/2013 5:54:16 AM
I used to plot my escape for hours in my room when I was that age.

I probably even told my mother about it.

Relax! I decided not to move to California about the time I realized to finance the move I'd have to get a job...which would require that I stay where the job was.

It's normal...relax!


sherri

Like my opinion really counts anyway...
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scrapintimenow
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Posted: 2/1/2013 5:57:43 AM
O this is so normal. It hurts so bad the first time they say they can't wait to get away from us. It's hormones I think. Now my daughter and I are close, but for about 4 years she couldn't wait to leave and I was ready to help her pack. Lol. Hang in there I know it hurts but it will get better.
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writermom1
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Posted: 2/1/2013 6:08:36 AM
So normal!

At least your kid dreams of England. I was basically going to recreate my favorite pages from the JC Penney home catalog somewhere nearby. Such were my dreams



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Gsquaredmom

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Posted: 2/1/2013 6:30:24 AM
Get a calendar and start tracking the days yourself. Say to her, "Oh, well, after your statement, I started to think of what life would be like when you were out of the house? Name a few simple things that you can do when she is not there. Less wash, maker her room into your craft room, sitting room, office, whatever, etc., so I thought I would count down the days also. Except put little smiley faces on your calendar! And actually count down the days. List by number. I don't know how many days it is, but let's say, 3254....start with that and each day go down a number. Act happy! Every so often, say, "Only so many more days until you are 18! and smile.

Your daughter will get exactly how you felt when she feels the same way.

=====================================================


OP, please don't do this. Even though she is pulling away, she needs to feel secure with you. I cannot believe this post is written by a parent. Who would hurt his/her child that way?



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AncestralPea

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Posted: 2/1/2013 6:37:36 AM

Get a calendar and start tracking the days yourself. Say to her, "Oh, well, after your statement, I started to think of what life would be like when you were out of the house? Name a few simple things that you can do when she is not there. Less wash, maker her room into your craft room, sitting room, office, whatever, etc., so I thought I would count down the days also. Except put little smiley faces on your calendar! And actually count down the days. List by number. I don't know how many days it is, but let's say, 3254....start with that and each day go down a number. Act happy! Every so often, say, "Only so many more days until you are 18! and smile.


Possibly the worst advice I have seen here at the pod.

Hopefully, this is no more than teenage angst. Love her and support her. If you feel she has mental health issues trust your gut and get her help.

Kids usually last out at someone who they know won't push them away - the person who loves them the most in this world.

ashazamm
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Posted: 2/1/2013 6:43:33 AM
Might be normal.

This may help: My SD felt the same way towards her mother. She said she counted the days to get away from her mom. When she turned 18 her mother ended up moving away from her for a better job opportunity. My SD, who once was miserable being in the same house with her mother, found herself sad and depressed and missing her mom so much that she drives to see her constantly.
They used to fight on a daily basis, now they are best friends. My SD will probably move to be closer to her as soon as she graduates from college.

A lot can change in five years.

MerryMom937
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Posted: 2/1/2013 6:48:52 AM
It sounds like typical adolescent over blown histrionics to me.


Do you think our parents had all this angst when we made similar statements as teenagers???
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