Any of you living in warm climates...re. gardening.

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Posted 5/1/2013 by toaojs in NSBR Board
 

toaojs
AncestralPea

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May 2005
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Posted: 5/1/2013 8:30:20 PM
My DH and I were talking about gardening and we were wondering if those of you that live in year round nice weather places...do you have a year round garden?!

Do you have to replant the garden multiple times in a year or do the veggies just continue to grow?

I am very intrigued by this and would love to learn about it!!


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TankTop
I teach, therefore I am a teacher

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December 2001
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Posted: 5/1/2013 8:34:13 PM
I have always wondered that as well.

Can you have fresh tomatos all year round?



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**Colleen**
AncestralPea

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January 2002
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Posted: 5/1/2013 9:15:55 PM
I'm a casual gardener -- but my tomatoes generally last until December. By then, I'm sick of them and yank them out until April or so.

We (coastal Orange County) have cool winters (no freezing, occasional 40s and 50s) so it's more like having spring, summer, spring and a month or so of rainy weather.

In summary, we have yard work all franking year!



MergeLeft
Typical Liberal

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August 2005
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Posted: 5/1/2013 9:53:21 PM
Here in SE Texas we can do two plantings of tomatoes, spring and fall. They (and most things) stop producing in the worst heat of summer. Lettuces and greens are planted in the fall and grow through the winter and early spring, as are most root vegetables. You could theoretically have something in your garden year round here.


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ADD_Housewife
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February 2002
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Posted: 5/1/2013 10:41:59 PM
What MergeLeft said.

Lettuces, broccoli and such are planted in the fall or very early spring.

My peppers didn't die over the winter and have sprouted again. I am going to plant a fall garden this year.



ExpatInIndia
PeaAddict

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June 2004
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Posted: 5/1/2013 11:07:12 PM
I'm in India. I can grow tomatoes all year round. Some months they grow better than others. I do have to replant them. I usually plant 2 times a year. I can grow lettuce in the winter when it's not so hot (70 degrees) but can't in the summer. I usually plant 2 batches a few weeks apart. Believe it or not, I've tried to get Rosemary and Basil going but can't get the seeds to take. (It may be my gardener either over watering or under watering). Once I get back from a month in the U.S., I'll try again.

I have celery and spinach growing and replant 2 times a year.

It's really hit or miss because I'm not the one watering the plants. Sometimes they grow, sometimes they don't.

and I love not having to worry about the whole frost issue and planting too soon.

toaojs
AncestralPea

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May 2005
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Loc: Beautiful Canada

Posted: 5/1/2013 11:48:47 PM
Wow...that's really cool... thanks for the responses!! I never thought that you guys would have to worry about the sun and heat and we have to worry about the cold and snow.


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cannes
Proud Pea-lice Wife!

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July 2002
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Posted: 5/2/2013 12:04:08 AM
I'm in Arizona. We've got extreme heat. In the early spring (February, usually) the summer garden goes in. That's all plants where you eat the fruit (peppers, squash, tomatoes, etc). In the heat of the summer, not many things grow, so I usually let the garden go dormant for two months or so. In the fall, the plants that you eat go in (lettuce, spinach, etc).

Here, we only have success with certain varieties of tomatoes. Smaller varieties do better. The larger varieties (like beefsteak) tend to burn and crack from the sun before they get ripe, so it's easier to grow smaller varieties.


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