My 7yo is turning into a Mean Girl :(

Two Peas is Closing
Click here to visit our final product sale. Click here to visit our FAQ page regarding the closing of Two Peas.

Posted 4/8/2014 by shescrafty2 in NSBR Board
 

shescrafty2
PeaFixture

PeaNut 178,427
November 2004
Posts: 3,491
Layouts: 0

Posted: 4/8/2014 4:06:12 PM
I have a 7yo DD that I am afraid is turning into a mean girl. She repeatedly excludes others from play or will instruct her friends not to teach somebody else their special bump handshake or a dance they made up. Today another mom told me that her daughter was sad because my daughter "kicked her out" of the game she was playing. She is grounded in her room for two days (we have a neighborhood with many kids and they usually play together outside) and we talked AGAIN about doing that to friends will lead to having no friends at all.

She has written letters of apology before, apologized in person, etc. and then she will do it again to somebody else.

Any other ideas? I hate that she acts like this!


********************************************************
your true character is shown not by how you treat people you agree with, but how you treat those you don't


ksuheather
low-information individual

PeaNut 190,373
February 2005
Posts: 8,196
Layouts: 0
Loc: wherever the army sends us

Posted: 4/8/2014 4:12:04 PM
I'm so sorry you are going through this. Have you tried turning the tables and asking how she would feel if someone acted that way towards her? I think a logical consequence would be that she's not allowed to play in the neighborhood without parental supervision. That would stink for you but maybe her missing out would motivate her to change her ways.



A veteran is someone who, at one
point in his life, wrote a blank check
made payable to 'The United States of
America ' for an amount of 'up to and including my life.'


Mallie
PeaFixture

PeaNut 574,604
December 2012
Posts: 3,746
Layouts: 0

Posted: 4/8/2014 4:23:07 PM
Here are some books that might help:

http://www.amazon.com/Queen-Bees-Wannabes-Boyfriends-Realities/dp/0307454444

http://www.amazon.com/Girl-Wars-Strategies-Female-Bullying/dp/0743249879/ref=pd_sim_b_10?ie=UTF8&refRID=1YJ3KXRRTNJQRFC488XN

http://www.amazon.com/Reviving-Ophelia-Saving-Selves-Adolescent/dp/1594481881/ref=pd_sim_b_13?ie=UTF8&refRID=1SCJX5XPZ6E8BMWE4NBY

Blue_Violet
PeaNut

PeaNut 543,767
February 2012
Posts: 157
Layouts: 0

Posted: 4/8/2014 4:28:10 PM
At seven, she's still going to be pretty self centered. There are free resources that you can direct her toward at GirlsHealth.gov that might help her see the problems with her behavior and ways that she can change it.

Amber!
PeaFixture

PeaNut 84,763
May 2003
Posts: 3,501
Layouts: 57
Loc: California

Posted: 4/8/2014 5:18:40 PM
My first thought would be perhaps some sort of volunteer work, like volunteering at a soup kitchen or whatnot, but I'm not sure how that would directly relate back to the bad behavior.. maybe just a lesson in being kind? Always supporting and helping others? Well, just thought I'd put that out there Good luck, you're a good mom for trying to help change!


Cuz I'm another Swaggernaut - My Swagbucks referral link

Epeanymous
PeaFixture

PeaNut 15,108
May 2001
Posts: 3,301
Layouts: 1

Posted: 4/8/2014 5:22:10 PM
Aw, man. Well, at least you are noticing and responding to it, which has to be good -- most of the time I find that when I meet a mean girl, she turns out to have a mean girl mom who just doesn't recognize it. No good advice, but I hope you can get some good advice from others.

shescrafty2
PeaFixture

PeaNut 178,427
November 2004
Posts: 3,491
Layouts: 0

Posted: 4/8/2014 5:51:48 PM
Conversely she is also so so sweet to some kids in her class with special needs. She lives being their helper, sits by one little boy at lunch when she can who is non-verbal, and many people have told me how sweet she is in the classroom. But when she decides to be nasty it comes out.

We had previously stopped Disney shows like Jesse because of how rude some of the characters were so that will be put back in place. I just don't know why she can be so mean. When called on it she is very sad and apologetic. She has no problems writing the letters, giving them to the people, etc. but a week or two later she will do it again to somebody else.


********************************************************
your true character is shown not by how you treat people you agree with, but how you treat those you don't


ksuheather
low-information individual

PeaNut 190,373
February 2005
Posts: 8,196
Layouts: 0
Loc: wherever the army sends us

Posted: 4/8/2014 5:55:20 PM
Maybe reminders of behavioral expectations before she goes out to play. I do that with my 3. For example, if we are going to Target we talk about how to walk, voice levels, not whining or begging etc. That seems to help with even my 10 year old.



A veteran is someone who, at one
point in his life, wrote a blank check
made payable to 'The United States of
America ' for an amount of 'up to and including my life.'


Georgiapea
Mom to the Wild Things.

PeaNut 96,783
July 2003
Posts: 28,225
Layouts: 0
Loc: Altoona, Alabama

Posted: 4/8/2014 5:57:13 PM
Can you talk with her about it? Ask what the difference is between her being kind and compassionate to the disadvantaged children and out right mean to others. Actions have consequences. Is she able to grasp that at 7? No 7 year olds in my life at the moment.

readsomething
Got Samoas?

PeaNut 70,391
February 2003
Posts: 7,964
Layouts: 1
Loc: Norfolk VA

Posted: 4/8/2014 6:11:02 PM
I agree with the reminders. This is a new skill she is learning -- a type of empathy.

So, EVERY SINGLE TIME before she heads out to play: "What will we do if [name a kid she has excluded before] wants to play?"

Role-playing is good. A lot of kids can't make the leap if you just give them examples, so having her BE the kid who is excluded might help. You could play the part of a bully. That seems to help, because it's her mommy, who loves her, pretending to be a bully. That is a good eye-opener.

Literally, think of some examples and run through the scenarios -- teaching the special handshake, sharing a treat with someone new, etc.

You might also include lessons later on what to do if someone else tries to exclude her or excludes one of her friends.

I found that, with my daughter (who is now 11) that worked really well. We had a problem with "triangulation" -- she's fine with another girl, but if you introduce a third girl into the situation, DD's friend doesn't like it when the third girl plays with DD. So we had to do a lot of role-playing for various situations: What to say, tone of voice, etc.


Heather
Finally Four of Us
Regional vice president of the National Sarcasm Society (Like We Need Your Support)
Senior Executive Vice President, Dunder-Mifflin Paper Co., Scranton PA
"Every time I use a coupon, Satan gets another one of his toenails pulled out."

oaksong
BucketHead

PeaNut 594,977
September 2013
Posts: 805
Layouts: 7
Loc: There's no place like home...
Posted: 4/8/2014 6:14:41 PM
My DD16 just told me yesterday that the Disney Channel is corrupting little girls and providing role models that encourages them to act this way (she has a 10yo cousin.) She watched a show recently and was shocked at how much it's changed. Interesting that it's coming from a teenager, but she described in detail the way some of the main, seemingly nice, characters behave, and she has a compelling case.

Sorry you're going through this. She'll figure out the downside soon enough, especially with your close monitoring of the situation.

megmc
Ancient Ancestor of Pea

PeaNut 497,090
January 2011
Posts: 7,223
Layouts: 1

Posted: 4/8/2014 6:32:22 PM
I posted about this in another thread about my daughter "bullying" another girl in preschool. I put her. In a home preschool and the gal that ran it really helped daughter get pass the mean girl/bully stage she was in.

I can ask her what she did to curb it if you want.




cobike
PeaNut

PeaNut 590,604
July 2013
Posts: 27
Layouts: 0

Posted: 4/8/2014 6:42:40 PM
Maybe she also likes the added attention of writing apology letters.

caroscraps
7 Sweetpeas for me

PeaNut 20,301
August 2001
Posts: 12,471
Layouts: 0
Loc: The PEAch State

Posted: 4/8/2014 7:11:16 PM
Thank you for being on top of this situation w/your DD. My DGD, age 7, was bullied by two girls in her class this year. The girl doing the bullying was DGD's BFF last year so it has been very hurtful to DGD this year.

My DD spoke to the two moms about the situation and they were of no help, didn't believe it, etc.

DD finally went to the teacher and the situation has been resolved. The teacher was great.

7 year old girls can be very dramatic in their quest for friends. It starts around this age.

I think role playing making your DD the victim is a great idea. And continue with the apologies to the child face to face.


<>< <>< <><
****************************************************
********************************************









Uploaded with iPhone client

flanz
Ancient Ancestor of Pea

PeaNut 211,902
June 2005
Posts: 6,054
Layouts: 2

Posted: 4/8/2014 8:02:01 PM
I agree with the comments caroscraps just made. Thank you for getting on this! Little girls can be very, very mean, and your daughter is lucky to have a mom engaged enough to help her change her ways early on!

KatieBPea
AncestralPea

PeaNut 30,940
February 2002
Posts: 4,786
Layouts: 0
Loc: NJ

Posted: 4/8/2014 9:01:52 PM
I think the fact that you're aware if the situation and addressing is a good thing.

I'm watching a situation where the mom of a young teen is totally in denial about the things her daughter is doing, and it isn't pretty.


Uploaded with iPhone client

happyOCgirl
PeaNut

PeaNut 213,289
July 2005
Posts: 461
Layouts: 5
Loc: Orange County, CA

Posted: 4/8/2014 9:26:27 PM
I deal with this every year with my seven year old students. I am screaming a THANK YOU for being on top of it. Most parents blame other kids for their child's mean behavior.
Have you heard of the book "have You Filled A Bucket Today?" I read a lot of books to my class and have discussions/role play scenarios about bullies and being mean/bossy. This book gets the best discussion and honest questions about what to do to change. After the book, I just have to say "your actions were a dipper...can you tell me why?" Then, we talk about how to turn the situation into being a "filler". It takes a lot of catching their mean behavior for them to see why it was wrong. No joke - spring is mean girl season for me every year!
Good luck!



beachgurl
Ancient Ancestor of Pea

PeaNut 288,459
December 2006
Posts: 6,892
Layouts: 0

Posted: 4/8/2014 10:35:34 PM
No advice other than to say that you are a good mom.




NO_Mom
PeaNut

PeaNut 229,776
November 2005
Posts: 434
Layouts: 1
Loc: somewhere that is butt freezing cold

Posted: 4/8/2014 11:14:18 PM
Kudos to you for being on top of your dd' s behaviour. We have moved to a new school this past year & my 9 yo has been put to the test by 2 bullies this year. The first one we nipped in the butt right away. The second one, I let go too long. This girl is less than desirable. A manipulative little brat. She was terrible to my daughter and has her little minion that claims to be a Christian girl & follows her every step. I am told that, well, this is how 3rd graders act. I say BS to that. The last school we were at, there were no problems at all with the girls being horrendous like they are here. I have always taught my kids to be kind to other people. They have never had the desire to be mean to their friends or leave people out. I think you just have to keep on top of her behavior. Good luck, I hope you can turn her around. There are far too many mean kids and not enough parents that care.

_Betsy_
AncestralPea

PeaNut 153,004
June 2004
Posts: 4,431
Layouts: 22

Posted: 4/8/2014 11:14:21 PM
I have a 7.5 yo DD, it's rough sometimes.

I think asking her to think about how her words and actions make the other girl feel is a good idea. And ask how she would feel if she were in the other person's shoes. Role play with her.

shescrafty2
PeaFixture

PeaNut 178,427
November 2004
Posts: 3,491
Layouts: 0

Posted: 4/9/2014 7:18:19 PM
Thank you for all of your kind words. Last night we went over how others feel when she is mean, and how their parents probably feel about her (my DD) when they hear she was mean to their daughters, etc. We also talked about when my son was made fun of for being Asian this year in middle school and how his two Best friends had his back and made the rude child back down. I let her know that if she is not careful when she is older she won't have anyone to stand up with her if she continues to ostracize others.

Today I saw her go up to both girls and apologize to them (I volunteered for. Reading program at the school and all 3 girls were in the
Media center as school was starting). I asked her about recess and she told me she asked the same girls she was mean to yesterday to play with her today. I hope with regular reminders she wi stop this
Behavior now and not have it escalate.

Thanks for the advice!



********************************************************
your true character is shown not by how you treat people you agree with, but how you treat those you don't


*Delphinium Twinkle*
I'm just a pea:)

PeaNut 163,613
August 2004
Posts: 78,773
Layouts: 236
Loc: *Sunny Southern California*

Posted: 4/9/2014 10:08:49 PM
You're a good mom.
Lots of moms don't like to admit their kids aren't perfect in the playground


Bethie
proud Fiskateer #269
{My Blog}
*My Scraproom*
Uploaded with iPhone client

twinkle22
PeaNut

PeaNut 161,671
August 2004
Posts: 488
Layouts: 6
Loc: Scarsdale, NY

Posted: 4/9/2014 10:39:49 PM
As fantastic as you are for being on top of this, please don't label your DD as a bully or mean girl too quickly. None of us are perfect,and we learn social behaviors at different rates and in different ways. I teach 3-4 year olds and you would be surprised at the behaviors I see so young. Some girls are naturally empathetic and caring, and some have tendencies to exclude others or compete for friends, and you can see them figuring out what works and what doesn't. She may well decide one day that it isn't worth it to be mean, or decide that she genuinely prefers to be nice. I think much of it is maturity.
My DD (who is 10 now) went through this in a big way and we are still struggling, but we are miles away from when parents would call. I know how painful it is to hear another parent (a friend) say your DD is "mean". I also can see the end of the tunnel and know she will be fine.
I also think the word "bully" is used way too often; just because someone doesn't want to play with you doesn't make her a "bully", and some kids need to get over it and move on before calling a teacher (ie:me).

shescrafty2
PeaFixture

PeaNut 178,427
November 2004
Posts: 3,491
Layouts: 0

Posted: 4/10/2014 6:08:54 AM
I posted that my dd was turning into a mean girl because a pattern has been developing where she is the one being exclusionary. I think at heart she is a sweet, loving girl, but I also think there is power in being the person who others listen to. I don't want her to enjoy that more than she enjoys being kind and happy.

She has what others have called a "captivating personality." She is fun and funny and even in kindergarten many older kids would walk by her and call out and speak to her. I don't want that engaging part of her personality to become twisted or ugly. I don't want her causing pain to anybody else. I don't think telling someone they can't play with her is bullying, but I do think it is rude. I used to teach 3rd grade and i have seen just how mean little girls can be if not put in check.


********************************************************
your true character is shown not by how you treat people you agree with, but how you treat those you don't


NO_Mom
PeaNut

PeaNut 229,776
November 2005
Posts: 434
Layouts: 1
Loc: somewhere that is butt freezing cold

Posted: 4/10/2014 7:21:42 AM
You are a great mom & I think you handled it perfectly. And for you to notice the behavior right away is pretty incredible. Most parents are oblivious & don't have the time.

The teacher that posted before you makes me so sad. I'll keep my opinion to myself, but will say, I hope my children never have a snotty teacher like her. She reminds me of all the mean girls in hs, and unfortunately people entrust her with their children every day!

PinkShirley
Running the Marathon, Not the Sprint

PeaNut 110,589
October 2003
Posts: 7,100
Layouts: 8
Loc: Texas

Posted: 4/10/2014 7:54:37 AM
I am with other posters before me...the Disney Channel is the Devil incarnate for girls. We blocked all channels that had the grating, mean girl shows and I do strongly believe it has made a difference in how our girls act.

Role playing is excellent. It helps my girls practice good behavior.

Could she be learning this behavior from another girl in class you are not aware of?

The great thing is you are on top of the situation. Keep up the good work and she will adjust.

Just T
I need therapea!

PeaNut 65,272
January 2003
Posts: 14,346
Layouts: 0
Loc: In my own little world

Posted: 4/10/2014 8:08:45 AM

As fantastic as you are for being on top of this, please don't label your DD as a bully or mean girl too quickly. None of us are perfect,and we learn social behaviors at different rates and in different ways. I teach 3-4 year olds and you would be surprised at the behaviors I see so young. Some girls are naturally empathetic and caring, and some have tendencies to exclude others or compete for friends, and you can see them figuring out what works and what doesn't. She may well decide one day that it isn't worth it to be mean, or decide that she genuinely prefers to be nice. I think much of it is maturity.
My DD (who is 10 now) went through this in a big way and we are still struggling, but we are miles away from when parents would call. I know how painful it is to hear another parent (a friend) say your DD is "mean". I also can see the end of the tunnel and know she will be fine.
I also think the word "bully" is used way too often; just because someone doesn't want to play with you doesn't make her a "bully", and some kids need to get over it and move on before calling a teacher (ie:me).


I don't even know what to address first out of this poppycock.

I have never seen a "mean girl" just out of the blue decide she'd rather be nice. I have 2 girls, 18 and 15. Pretty much across the board, those who were the mean girls in elementary schools are STILL the mean snotty girls in high school. I don't know one who just all of the sudden became nice. What a joke.

A 7 year old is plenty old enough to be a mean girl, and be disciplined for being a mean girl. Honestly, I think it is attitudes like yours that ensure that someone who is mean as a little girl grows up to be a mean big girl.

As for your last statement about being too quick to call things bullying...what a bunch of bull. Have you ever had one of your children be bullied? I have. It sucks. It goes way beyond a kid not playing with him on the playground. My son was bullied. At one point, when trying to talk to the parents of the kid who was horrible to my son every single day on the bus in 8th grade, who spit on him, the dad says, "your son is too sensitive. Kids that age joke around all the time." Yeah, it was obvious exactly why his little jacka$$ son was a bully.


missymiss
PeaNut

PeaNut 500,919
March 2011
Posts: 48
Layouts: 0

Posted: 4/10/2014 8:10:01 AM
Thank you for being proactive. My 7 year old has been on the other side this school year. Most of the girls in her class have been mean to her and excluding her at recess. These are the same girls that always wanted to play with her in the past.

Newbie2
StuckOnPeas

PeaNut 178,513
November 2004
Posts: 2,390
Layouts: 1
Loc: New England

Posted: 4/10/2014 9:29:18 AM

As fantastic as you are for being on top of this, please don't label your DD as a bully or mean girl too quickly. None of us are perfect,and we learn social behaviors at different rates and in different ways. I teach 3-4 year olds and you would be surprised at the behaviors I see so young. Some girls are naturally empathetic and caring, and some have tendencies to exclude others or compete for friends, and you can see them figuring out what works and what doesn't. She may well decide one day that it isn't worth it to be mean, or decide that she genuinely prefers to be nice. I think much of it is maturity.
My DD (who is 10 now) went through this in a big way and we are still struggling, but we are miles away from when parents would call. I know how painful it is to hear another parent (a friend) say your DD is "mean". I also can see the end of the tunnel and know she will be fine.
I also think the word "bully" is used way too often; just because someone doesn't want to play with you doesn't make her a "bully", and some kids need to get over it and move on before calling a teacher (ie:me).


^^^^This, is why there ARE mean girls and bullies. Glad you aren't my 7yo DD's teacher.

Thanks OP, for being pro-active, and not allowing this to turn into a mean teen...




sugarcoated
StuckOnPeas

PeaNut 140,176
April 2004
Posts: 2,259
Layouts: 0
Loc: At Work

Posted: 4/10/2014 9:38:55 AM

I also think the word "bully" is used way too often; just because someone doesn't want to play with you doesn't make her a "bully", and some kids need to get over it and move on before calling a teacher (ie:me).



Exclusion is bullying. What makes it bullying is when your mean DD encites others to leave a girl's side and take up with her, then your DD and the cohorts she has under threat basically, belittle the other girl with comments, eye rolls, etc.

The fact that your DD doesn't want to play with someone is more telling of her than the other girl. Why doesn't she? Why is she not wanting more playmates or interaction. Kind girls do not exclude. That's the bottom line.

If you do not understand that, then I would imagine you are a mean girl yourself and because you admit you have raised one. You should get counseling because, as I am sure you know, most bullying is the result of insecurity and inferiority. For you and your DD to have been working for years on being a mean girl, she must feel really sucky inside. You need to get to the core of that. Perhaps you yourself are making her feel insecure. Maybe you aren't listening to something she's trying to tell you.

You really need to work on making your miserable child more comfortable in her own skin instead of excusing the fact that she needs to make others feel miserable to make herself feel better.

peamac
Ancient Ancestor of Pea

PeaNut 340,335
October 2007
Posts: 6,352
Layouts: 3
Loc: Colorado

Posted: 4/10/2014 9:50:00 AM
So much great advice! I'd add that in addition to writing letters and apologizing, she needs to do/say two or three kind things for each person she has hurt. It will cause her to replace the unkindness with kindnesses, giving her the chance to practice what she should have been doing. It's not a punishment but a correction- showing her (actively) how she should be treating the kids.


PeaMac


luvcookies
StuckOnPeas

PeaNut 409,644
January 2009
Posts: 2,242
Layouts: 0

Posted: 4/10/2014 9:51:37 AM
Not much to add, but kudos for addressing this. My son had major problems with a couple boys in elementary who the parents would never admit were being mean or bullying. To this day, they are still not nice kids. I shudder to think of them as adults.




Bootspalmer
PeaAddict

PeaNut 598,310
December 2013
Posts: 1,167
Layouts: 0
Posted: 4/10/2014 9:53:39 AM
I knew a mean girl at DS school years ago. She would have been about 10-11 so a little older. The girl she was excluding was a sweet girl who I really liked but it didn't involve me so I MMOB.

The "mean" girl goes to university now, she is really nice. She has matured and is friendly, well spoken and has a bubbly personality. I do think some kids can change. She is really sweet now! I see her all the time (she works part time at a grocery store near me).

scrappin jen
PeaAddict

PeaNut 111,615
October 2003
Posts: 1,644
Layouts: 0

Posted: 4/10/2014 12:24:11 PM
We have this issue in my Daisy Troop. We have 21 first grade girls. We talk all the time about being a friend to every scout,etc but it's the age of the girls to behave this way. We tried to nip it in the bud with the book "Have you filled a Bucket Today?" Now we use that in our meetings. Each girl shares what she did that week to fill or take away from someone's bucket. If we see something during a meeting we can ask which side of that coin their actions fall. We also have apologies start with I'm sorry for..... Trying to teach them to be accountable for the action not just saying sorry. You are a great mom for recognizing and trying to teach her now at this young age.

KristenFNJ
PeaAddict

PeaNut 272,058
August 2006
Posts: 1,367
Layouts: 0
Loc: New Jersey

Posted: 4/10/2014 1:23:15 PM
Hugs to you, this is so hard! Kudos, along with what others have said, for being proactive.

I didn't see this specifically mentioned in any of the OP posts, so I'm wondering if you've asked DD WHY she has made some of the choices she has made regarding her treatment of other girls. Her answers could run the gamut of course, and it might be hard for a 7 year old be able to even verbalize. But there's a chance that she herself might be able to give insight into why the behavior seems to repeat despite all of your thoughtful discussions and meaningful consequences.

She might feel threatened in some way (I KNOW the other little girls aren't literally threatening her, and she probably wouldn't use that word herself that if two of her friends become too close, they might exclude her, so she's trying to preempt that situation... maybe she was excluded once and hated it but hasn't been able to look at it empathetically, rather she took a proactive approach... maybe she wants to have a special dance with someone because it makes her feel like they have a tight bond, it's not so much about exclusion but about something to make this particular friendship special. (I actually remember that from my elementary years, having special nicknames with special friends, etc... I can see how this aspect independently from the "kicking out" actions can be developmentally appropriate for the age group in navigating relationships)

It could be any of these things, or none of these things, but if she's able to express her inspirations for her actions, it might give you a new insight to be able to work her out of it.


... and, FWIW (shuffles feet...) I kind of agree with taking a breath before slapping the label "mean girl" on a seven year old. I think it's 100% essential to recognize and intervene when this behavior occurs, I think it's also 100% possible to act on it thoroughly and effectively without having to call her anything at all. I'm a little surprised by how much defensiveness there seems to be by the suggestion that labeling a seven year old might not be the most productive step. It's kind of ironic to approach a kid for bullying behavior, which by definition tends to include name-calling, and start out the process by insisting on calling the kid a name. I sort of think if you need to call a seven year old a "mean girl" out loud in order to validate that the behavior is wrong, you're kind of missing the boat. It's not about what you call her. It's about what you do to help her change.

LynnGrieves0n
Volcanic Pea!

PeaNut 133,619
February 2004
Posts: 10,158
Layouts: 1,369
Loc: Far, far away

Posted: 4/10/2014 4:17:24 PM
Big, big kudos to you for recognising it and wanting to work on it. And I agree with the ban on TV, especially the Disney channel. US kid's TV shows and the way they glorify smart-mouthing makes people over here go :-0!!



LynnGrieves0n
Volcanic Pea!

PeaNut 133,619
February 2004
Posts: 10,158
Layouts: 1,369
Loc: Far, far away

Posted: 4/10/2014 4:19:35 PM
We always promote kindness as the most important virtue, and fortunately the schools do the same ... mean girl stuff still happens though.



Maryland
Ancient Ancestor of Pea

PeaNut 87,597
May 2003
Posts: 11,075
Layouts: 0

Posted: 4/10/2014 4:29:41 PM
That is so good that you recognize that your child is the problem and not blame it on others. That shows what a good mom you are! I don't have any advice, but wanted to let you know that that means a lot. Many moms and dads of mean boys and mean girls think their child does no wrong and doesn't try to help him or her.
Show/Hide Icons . Show/Hide Signatures
Hide
{{ title }}
{{ icon }}
{{ body }}
{{ footer }}