sRGB vs RGB in Photoshop can someone help me?
Post ReplyPost New TopicPosted 12/3/2012 by Fleur-de-Lisa in General Photography
 

Fleur-de-Lisa
StuckOnPeas

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Posted: 12/3/2012 12:25:48 PM
After taking a class with Jessica Sprague I did what she said and changed my Photoshop working area to RGB. But that is where I started to have problems whenever I edited and saved my pictures and sent them for printing they didn't look at all like what I had edited them to be and the colors were dull and lifeless, but yet they look so vibrant on my screen in RGB mode in Photoshop.

So what am I doing wrong? Do I have to do something to my pictures before I send them to an outside printing source?

voltagain
OklaPhoma

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Posted: 12/3/2012 2:03:46 PM
You need to edit in the same color space you will be using as the media output. Meaning, if it is going to be primarily web the RGB is great. But if you are going to be printing and your printer uses sRGB, that is what you will want to edit in..


What Your Kit Lens Can Do For You

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Fleur-de-Lisa
StuckOnPeas

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Posted: 12/3/2012 4:39:26 PM
As I understand it sRGB is for the web because the S just stands for screen. Then I thought RGB would be what I would use to send it to the printer but it seems that when I send it to Costco for instance, all of my changes in RGB don't transfer to the finished print. Feeling quite confused!

voltagain
OklaPhoma

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Posted: 12/4/2012 12:40:34 AM
The other issue is monitor calibration. You can set the brightness, contrast, etc so you like what you see. Doesn't mean it matches the printer out put.

If you aren't calibrated and your prints aren't matching your expectations it is something to look into.


What Your Kit Lens Can Do For You

Canon 60d, Canon 24-70mm 2.8L, Canon 70-200mm 2.8L, 50mm 1.8, 28-80, 75-300mm and Tamron 90mm 2.8 macro

gardencat
Jeepers PEApers

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Posted: 12/5/2012 5:41:45 PM
I always thought you should use CYMK for printed images since that corresponds to the inks printed images actually use.

lovetodigi
Ancient Ancestor of Pea

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Posted: 12/9/2012 8:55:13 PM
I did a search and found the following information that might help.

Try going to the following link and find the city that your Costco is located in. From there you will be able to download free color photo lab profiles for the printer that is used at that Costco. Install those in the correct folder on your computer and you should be able to choose that profile in Photoshop when working with your prints that you are sending to Costco. Make sure that you don't have Costco edit them again after they are submitted.

LINK


This link tells you how to use the profiles




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bobbie01
Ancient Ancestor of Pea

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Posted: 12/10/2012 1:21:47 AM

As I understand it sRGB is for the web because the S just stands for screen. Then I thought RGB would be what I would use to send it to the printer but it seems that when I send it to Costco for instance, all of my changes in RGB don't transfer to the finished print. Feeling quite confused!


The s doesn't stand for screen. It stands for Standard. RGB has more colors but it doesn't matter because they can't or most can't print those colors anyway.

Volt is right about your screen probably needs to be calibrated. You want your photos, on your screen, to match what your lab prints. The other issue is probably Costco. Try having your prints made at a pro lab like White House Custom Color. You don't need to be a pro to use them. Mpix is another pro lab.


Barb
Spee
CC always welcome Canon 7D,85 1.2, 17-55 2.8,100mm,30 1.4,Speedlite 580EXII

momy2six
StuckOnPeas

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Posted: 12/16/2012 9:55:55 AM
make sure when you send your images to be printed that you turn off the "auto correct" or auto enhance" feature on the costco site. (or kiosk, if you're using that) this has been the single most important thing that has helped me match what I see on the screen with what comes out at the printer. I have since learned about monitor callibration, but even that made little difference compared to jsut unchecking that little box.



cindylou62
PeaAddict

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Posted: 12/18/2012 11:23:34 AM
Yes make sure you always remember to uncheck the auto color correct, and tell any of your clients, relative etc that would print from you to do the same thing.

I once printed the same photo from 4 different spots that my clients take my CD's to and that one photo looked vastly different depending on where it was printed. Which makes me sick when I know this is the crud someone is putting on their wall and saying it is my work.

I have since added alot of direction and info on this to my clients print release in hopes that some of them will do it the proper way if they want a large wall print.

I also do not let them buy a CD until they have spent a certain amount of $$$ ordering through my website, so at least they have great prints to compare to. Printing frustrations are the worst.
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