Trying to learn my camera

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Posted 12/28/2012 by KrissaChelon in General Photography
 

KrissaChelon
PeaNut

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December 2011
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Posted: 12/28/2012 3:25:20 PM
I have had my Canon T2i for about a year and I had never used it off auto. I've been doing alot of reading and watching some videos on my manual settings. I am now understanding the concepts of SS, aperture, and ISO. I was trying to take a picture of my son in front of our Christmas tree, with him in focus and the tree blurred behind him. I put my f/5 and iSO at 200 and SS at 1/125. But I got no blur. I can't figure it out.. wish I could get out to practice more but its cold and with a little one and being 8 months pregnant my only practice is indoors. Does anyone have any suggestion? Any good tutorials or blogs to follow? Tips on getting a toddler to sit still? I'm feeling overwhelmed.
TIA

cindylou62
PeaAddict

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Posted: 12/28/2012 5:31:47 PM
Glad to see you are trying out Manual mode! You will get it, we have all been in your shoes. It takes a lot of practice and practicing on a fast moving target is really pushing yourself! The lens you are using is another thing, that blur you love so much, we all crave that. The better the lens the easier that is to achieve. Although any lens can achieve that somewhat.

If you are using a kit lens, then you will simply have to have your child sit a distance away from the tree, not right in front of it. The furthur away the backround is the better it will blur out, this has to do with aperature (F stop) the smaller the number the less will be in focus, you just want the focus on your son, and to blur the backround, so with a kit lens indoors, this may not be possible unless it is bright in there and it is a large room. Try changing your aperature with a little matchbox car or toy stay in the same spot, having it a couple of feet from a backdrop(wall etc.) and just change the aperature, you will see the difference and you will learn from it.

Sorry to say though that a kit lens works great outside, but inside, not so much, you will need a flash, as the lens needs sooo much light, your shutter speed will be too slow, your ISO would need to be pushed high, and the aperature of the lens will not be sufficient.


The best thing you can do in my opinion, when truly wanting to learn
and having to learn indoors is to invest in a 50mm 1.8 lens. They are inexpensive (around 90.00) and with it you will not only take some nice sharp shots in and outside, but you will get a lens with an aperature (F1.8) that will be able to do more creative things.

I am sure someone can explain all of this better than I can, but I just wanted you to know that I was once in your shoes and this is what worked for me.

Good Luck and when that new baby comes, you will not have mastered these things yet, so please put it in AUTO and shoot away, do not miss any of those precious moments. When the baby is napping practice manual on them, they sleep so soundly, you will have a nice still model, and a cute one at that!

Post photos here for help, we love that too. Cindy























































































voltagain
OklaPhoma

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Posted: 12/28/2012 6:41:23 PM
To obtain blur, not only do you need to consider the aperture, you also eed to consider distance. With an aperture of f/5 your depth of field is fairly large so if your subject is close enough to the background the background will also be in focus.

Try moving your son away from the tree ( move him closer to the camera) and also try using a 3.5 (you will need to use the widest angle on your lens)

This is a handy tool while you are learning depth of field calculator
Change the info in the boxes on the left to be the info you are using (your camera model, f stop, focal length, how far you are from the subject. The boxes on the right will then tell you where you image will start to get sharp and where the sharpness will end.

If you don't understand the boxes look at the graphic of the man with camera shooting trees. You are the camera man, the first set of white trees are the out of focus range between you and where your image gets sharp, the black trees are the sharp area and the last white tree are where the sharpness falls off. The numbers under the trees give the distances for your set up as you entered it in the boxes above.

When shooting indoors it is easier to get blur using a lens with a 1.8 or a 2.8 aperture. It IS possible using your kit lens but you have to use the wide angle and set the aperture to 3.5 then make sure your subject is far enough away from the back ground. Often the composition isn't what you want so you'll need to crop it afterward to achieve the best composition.


What Your Kit Lens Can Do For You

Canon 60d, Canon 24-70mm 2.8L, Canon 70-200mm 2.8L, 50mm 1.8, 28-80, 75-300mm and Tamron 90mm 2.8 macro

KrissaChelon
PeaNut

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December 2011
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Posted: 12/28/2012 7:56:28 PM
I have the lens i got in the kit but I also have a 55-250 mm lens. For some reason the lowest my F will go is 4.. I figured out why I can't get the blurred effect. After i get my son far enough away from the tree I run out of room to get far enough away from him. I don't think Im gonna be able to get this effect indoors. Thanks for all the help.

voltagain
OklaPhoma

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July 2001
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Loc: State of cultural confusion. Yeehaw and Aloha have collided!

Posted: 12/28/2012 11:22:51 PM
For some reason the lowest my F will go is 4..
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Because the lens is a zoom (variable focal lengths) and does not have only one largest aperture. Each time you zoom in the largest available aperture gets smaller. At 55mm the largest available aperture is 4.5 If you zoom out to 200mm the largest available aperture is 5.6. This arrangement is standard on budget zoom lenses.

It is ok for an outdoor lens but this lens was not really engineered for indoor use. For indoor use you really need something in the focal range of 18-55mm. Ideally with a largest aperture of 1.8 or 2.8

If the aperture marking shows two numbers in the set it means the largest available aperture is going to change with the focal length. If there is only one number it will be the largest contantly available aperture.

How to read the markings on a lens:



What Your Kit Lens Can Do For You

Canon 60d, Canon 24-70mm 2.8L, Canon 70-200mm 2.8L, 50mm 1.8, 28-80, 75-300mm and Tamron 90mm 2.8 macro

KrissaChelon
PeaNut

PeaNut 534,649
December 2011
Posts: 365
Layouts: 7
Loc: Kentucky

Posted: 12/30/2012 9:57:07 PM
If I knew how to post photos on here I would post a few of what I ended up with. I'm pretty pleased with the ones I took. I know I still have a lot to learn and need a lot of practice but ill get there eventually. Glad that I am venturing off of auto mode.
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