Which T4i lens would be better?
Post ReplyPost New TopicPosted 4/1/2013 by dschwer in General Photography
 

dschwer
PeaNut

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Posted: 4/1/2013 11:28:34 PM
I have been looking at the Canon T4i for quite a while. The online store I had been looking at had the body, 18-135 kit lens and an additional discount on the 55-250 lens. Total for that package is $882.

QVC has the T4i with the 18-55 kit lens and the 75-300 lens for $799 today. And they also offer five monthly payments.

Will I regret not getting the 18-135 lens? I know that the STM feature is really good for video, and also that it will be a better general purpose lens than the 18-55 since I will have more reach without changing lenses.

What do you all think?

dschwer
PeaNut

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Posted: 4/1/2013 11:36:30 PM
OK - I might've just answered my own question. The 75-300 lens on the QVC special does not have IS (image stabilization) while both of the lenses in the other configuration do.

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PeaFixture

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Posted: 4/2/2013 12:28:34 AM
I am looking at one T4i kit and it has these two lenses in it 18-55mm IS II Lens, 55-250mm IS II Lens. These both have IS to them(that is Image Stab right?) Also is it better to have the 75-300? or 55-250?

voltagain
OklaPhoma

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Posted: 4/2/2013 6:09:11 AM
There are a myriad reasons to call one lens "better" You have to quantify what YOU want from the gear. I do not miss an 18-135 lens at all. Other shooters would be lost without it.

55mm is roughly equivalent to the angle of view of human eye sight. Any focal range with a smaller number is going to be wider than eye sight. Larger numbers give you a narrower angle of view. The effect of that narrow angle is to make things look closer.

Some people shoot a lot in the 50-85mm range and find they have to change lenses a lot unless they go with an 18-135. My shooting preferences are geared to either shooting wider than 70mm or more zoomed out. I don't find myself jumping around in that gap space so I don't feel the need for an 18-135. But your mileage very well may be different.

On Canons, yes, IS is image stabilization.


What Your Kit Lens Can Do For You

Canon 60d, Canon 24-70mm 2.8L, Canon 70-200mm 2.8L, 50mm 1.8, 28-80, 75-300mm and Tamron 90mm 2.8 macro

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PeaAddict

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Posted: 4/2/2013 7:24:43 AM
I honestly didn't like my 18-135 and sold it a few years ago with my old camera D80... I would make sure you can't pick the lens you want and get a prime lens, but then I love primes.
Volt do you know the specs of full frame as far as does the lenses change in side up or down(example does it make a 50 mm lens like a 60 or take it away like a 40 i heard there was a little difference and i really havent understood exacly the full frame.. Thanks


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PeaFixture

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Posted: 4/2/2013 9:12:43 PM
Thank you again Volt. I have the 28-135 and its driving me nuts. On the 60d kit I was also entertaining its a 18-200.I loved my 18-135 lens with nikon.

voltagain
OklaPhoma

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Posted: 4/2/2013 10:55:40 PM
Volt do you know the specs of full frame as far as does the lenses change in side up or down(example does it make a 50 mm lens like a 60 or take it away like a 40 i heard there was a little difference and i really havent understood exacly the full frame.
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

The 35mm film frame is the standard, or the bench mark we use to measure from. We don't really think or speak of it going the other way; like you have asked the question. That may change as more people are familiar with the crop before they ever experience the full frame. On a 35mm film, a 50mm lens has an angle of view that is roughly equivalent to the angle of view of normal human eye sight. This is our historic starting point for discussion.

A smaller sensor only captures what is in the center of the len's angle of view... on an APS-c sensor with a 50mm lens it is not going to capture the same side to side range by a factor of about 1.6 (there is some variance here). In essence it crops the image before you even take the photo. So your 50mm on a crop sensor gives an angle of view more like you get with an 80mm lens on a 35mm film frame.

But to really understand it I think most people have to experience shooting the same scene using different sensors to get a real understanding of what is going on.


What Your Kit Lens Can Do For You

Canon 60d, Canon 24-70mm 2.8L, Canon 70-200mm 2.8L, 50mm 1.8, 28-80, 75-300mm and Tamron 90mm 2.8 macro
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