My distress inks don't seem to be "sticking" to my rubber stamps . . . any suggestions?
Post ReplyPost New TopicPosted 11/24/2012 by KBPea in General Stamping
 

KBPea
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Posted: 11/24/2012 8:05:16 PM
I'm having trouble getting some of my distress inks to adhere to red rubber stamps (Hero Arts) properly. These are big, wood-mounted background stamps, so the image is coming out really splotchy. They are not new/unused stamps, and the inks are "pooling" on more than one stamp, so the stamps themselves may not be the problem.

I tried my go-to trick, inking the stamp with VersaMark first, but that didn't work. Do you think the problem could be with my inks? Maybe I need to invest in some re-inkers? These ink pads are a couple years old but have not been used that many times. My black and brown distress inks that were purchased around the same time have seen far more use and are still going strong.

I appreciate any suggestions you have!

yellowcherrios
StuckOnPeas

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Posted: 11/24/2012 11:47:04 PM
KBPea, I found that the distressed inks also pool up on all my stamps---and at times, I have used that as an effect with a stamp.

But when I did NOT want that effect, I found that if I used the sponge tool to apply the ink to the stamp, rather than applying the ink pad to the stamp directly, that that method produced a more even coverage. Not sure if this method will work with all types of stamps, or images in the stamp. I have only used it with a stamp from Inkadinkadoo Foliage Trails stamp and it worked:

Foliage trails stamp .

I figure if the ink doesn't pool on a clear stamp, than it'd be less likely to do it on a rubber one (wooden or cling) too!

This is the card I used this method on---the INSIDE of the card is where I applied distressed inks to my stamp with the SPONGE tool:

flower card

HTH!! Let us know what works for you!


Melissa

mtk107
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Posted: 11/25/2012 7:58:04 AM
Try lightly sanding your stamp. I find that new stamps have a residue on them that isn't visible...especially clear stamps.

looser
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Posted: 11/25/2012 9:36:32 AM
Since your rubber is not new, I think you can rule that out. Note: I would never recommend sanding rubber.

As you may know already, DIs are not meant to produce the even coverage that other inks do--that's why they are 'distress'. But I agree that 'pooling' is not (for me) usual.

If the DIs are new, that might be the problem. I would try loading them the way 'Yellow' suggests. You might try swiping on the inkpad rather than pouncing to load the stamp. I've had success doing it that way. HTH


Daniel R. Boone

KBPea
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Posted: 11/25/2012 11:48:14 AM
Thanks for the tips! Last night I used Staz On cleaner to get off any gunk that may have been on the stamps. I let the stamps dry overnight. This morning I used my blending tool to rub over the top of the ink pad. Then I did my usual VersaMark plus Distress Ink combo. There is still some splotchiness if you look closely, but the images came out better. It may have had something to do with the difference in the quality of cardstock I was using too.

yellowcherrios
StuckOnPeas

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Posted: 11/25/2012 12:07:29 PM
oooo! I never thought about doing Versamark then using the blending tool to apply the distressed inks---I just used the blending tool to apply the distressed inks directly to the stamp w/o Versamark. I'll have to try having Versamark already on the stamp when I apply the distressed ink with the blending tool!


Melissa

prospurring
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Posted: 11/25/2012 6:39:37 PM
Distress Inks are supposed to give a splotchy, distressed look if used directly on a stamp. That's one of their "features." Splotchy can look very artistic. Artwork actually looks better when there is an organic, handmade quality to it - and that is something Distress Inks can provide for you. That being said, there are all kinds of ways to use Distress Inks to give you the look you desire. I'm glad you found a solution.



KBPea
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Posted: 11/25/2012 6:51:48 PM

Distress Inks are supposed to give a splotchy, distressed look if used directly on a stamp. That's one of their "features." Splotchy can look very artistic. Artwork actually looks better when there is an organic, handmade quality to it - and that is something Distress Inks can provide for you. That being said, there are all kinds of ways to use Distress Inks to give you the look you desire. I'm glad you found a solution.



I guess I need to find a different ink to use if I want a really "solid" background. However, I've already purchased so many Distress Inks (I think I have almost all of the non-seasonal ones) that I try to always use them. I do have black Staz On and a brown Adirondack ink, but I don't have the cash or the space to invest in a whole bunch of other types of ink too. This particular stamp was a big cloud background, so my black or brown ink pad would not have been a good choice

prospurring
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Posted: 11/26/2012 8:55:37 PM
For a design that is more "solid" like a cloud background, I would suggest a pigment ink. You might be able to find one at a big box craft store with a coupon...

It doesn't have to be a big stamp pad. The VersaMagic Dew Drops come in sets of 4 colors at the big box stores and don't take up too much space.

Or stamp with VersaMark and heat emboss?

But yeah, I'm thinking black or brown probably isn't right.



gardencat
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Posted: 11/27/2012 8:58:03 AM
Whenever I use my distress inks, I have the feeling that ink pads are harder than my pigment ink pads and more just skim the surface of the stamp rather than allowing the stamp to sink into the surface a bit I think that might have something to do with the problem applying them too...it could explain why applying the ink with the softer blending tool might give better coverage.When I use DI and want a more solid coverage I generally take a lot longer inking the stamp and also, like Daniel, add some swiping action instead of just tapping the ink on.

neetasduggal
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Posted: 12/1/2012 1:33:04 PM
I think im a little late for this post but I also feel I have very similar problems with distress inks. I bought soooo many distress inks when they came out and now I have the whole set I believe. So I am also trying to use them up and not buy other inks. I wish I would have explored a little more with the distress inks before purchasing so many. Although, I do feel the splotchy distressed look is very pretty and vintage. however if I am trying to get a clean cut stamp image then the distress ink does not work well at all, as it "pools" on the stamp. I have also heard to NOT sand the stamps as that could ruin the stamps. I am going to the try the technique with the sponge tool that "yellow" mentioned earlier. Thanks for everyones input and it is nice to see others who share my problem also!!

If anyone has any other suggestions I would to hear about them! thanks

JannyGirl
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Posted: 12/2/2012 7:47:34 AM
Distress Inks are really for creating background effects or "distressing" the edges of paper and cardstock. You can stamp with them, but you won't get a crisp, clear image. When I'm using large background stamps, I find it helpful to lay the stamp face-up and place my paper/cardstock on top of the stamp. Then I gently rub the back of the paper, making sure to keep one finger on the paper at all times so that it won't move. If you have intricate designs, VersaFine is probably the best ink to use. Hope this helps, and good luck.



howdyheidi
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Posted: 12/2/2012 8:50:15 AM
An idea I don't think was mentioned yet is to hold the stamp onto the paper longer than you would usually. I've had pretty good results with this combined with the other ideas for loading the ink on the stamp that others have mentioned.


~~Heidi~~



looser
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Posted: 12/2/2012 10:03:23 AM
Excellent tip, Heidi!

I usually leave waterbase/dye inks on the paper for about 30 seconds (minimum). That gives the paper time to wick off & absorb the pigment.


Daniel R. Boone

Renaeb77
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Posted: 12/6/2012 10:26:22 PM
I took an online class with Tim Holtz. He primes all of his stamps with archival ink. He'll ink the stamp with black archival ink, stamp the image, and that's it. The distress stuck to the stamp much better afterward. The archival ink is waterproof so as long as its dry it won't come off on the ink pads.

Oh, and he doesn't clean his stamps either. Just wipes them with a damp cloth.


Blog: http://renaeslifeinpictures.blogspot.com


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KBPea
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Posted: 12/7/2012 7:20:53 AM
Renaeb77, is the idea to ink up the stamp with the black Archival ink just when you first get it, or does he ink it up, wait for it to dry, then add a colored ink every time he wants to stamp that image? Thanks!

Renaeb77
PeaNut

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Posted: 12/7/2012 11:50:01 AM
I think he inked them up to prime the stamp. For some reason the archival ink helped other inks to stick to the stamp better.

Let me watch it again and I'll report back.


Blog: http://renaeslifeinpictures.blogspot.com



neetasduggal
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Posted: 12/10/2012 4:45:06 PM
oooo i think thats the secret! i have tried it with using archival once on my brand new stamp and it hold better. plus since tim never cleans the stamp there is always some left over archiver on the stamp. tahnks for sharing the tip!
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