What's the 'difference'?
Post ReplyPost New TopicPosted 11/25/2012 by looser in General Stamping
 

looser
The Craft Curmudgeon

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Posted: 11/25/2012 10:34:30 AM
Jan (Far North) has a thread about Kraft paper. In it she uses both the word paper & cardstock for what she's interested in. No prob since she talks about what she wants to do with the Kraft material.

But it got me thinking. We very often talk about paper & cardstock almost interchangeably. Nothing wrong with that since 'we' know what we're thinking of, but... If you had to define the difference between paper & cs, how would you go about it?

For YOU, when is it 'paper' & when is it 'cardstock'? Does it depend on the stiffness/flexibility? Weight? ETC.

Do you ever turn paper into cardstock? How? Why?

This inquiring mind wants to know...


Daniel R. Boone

beady
AlienGreenPea

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Posted: 11/25/2012 12:24:57 PM
I go by weight and 80 lb. is the dividing line. Above is card stock, below is paper. If their is a printed paper I would like as a base card, I glue it it to card stock.


Kathy
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KBPea
Ancient Ancestor of Pea

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Posted: 11/25/2012 1:14:25 PM
I'm not sure about a hard "lb." line, but when I say paper I mean lighter weight stuff made by scrapbooking companies/patterned paper (although those are sometimes actually cardstock). Paper is flimsier than cardstock. To me, cardstock is a heavier, solid color item that is sturdy enough to be the base of a card. E.g. what Bazzill is known for (although now they make some patterned papers too).

I guess it could get confusing. I'd better start being more specific when I am posting here!

looser
The Craft Curmudgeon

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Posted: 11/25/2012 3:39:00 PM
Good start, pals!

One way I define paper from cardstock is the 'crumple test'. If I can wad up the material in my hands? It's paper.


Daniel R. Boone

gardencat
Jeepers PEApers

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Posted: 11/26/2012 8:31:00 AM
"Do you ever turn paper into cardstock? How? Why?"

Funny you should ask. I did that just yesterday. I wanted a patterned card stock for trees on a card but the patterns I liked were all on flimsy-ish paper and I wanted to pop dot the trees up so they needed to have some rigidity, so I cut the trees out of plain card stock, used one of my Xyron tools to stick the trees to the PP and then cut around the card stock trees.

For me there isn't actually a hard and fast line between PP and card stock. It all depends on stiffness and ability to "stand" or support a card, on it's own.

I kind of wish the companies who make the papers and the stacks were a little more consistent in their weights. I've bought a few stacks which, in the store looked to be stock but, on use, are kind of too flimsy to really support a card. Sometimes additives make a difference too stock with heavy applications of glitter or glossy areas will come across as much heavier than their actual 'paper' weight.

All of which leads me to another question, sorry Daniel, tangent coming up here: do any of you have problems when you make cards that the front, if it is heavily embellished or layered, is just too heavy and out of balance with the back of the card? And if so, what do you do about it?

looser
The Craft Curmudgeon

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Posted: 11/26/2012 9:01:01 AM
'Tangent' away, 'GC'!

Good tip on turning paper into cardstock. I've pasted 2 or more thin papers to thicken.

Far as your 'balance' question. Are you talking about physical weight? If so, I would always recommend using a heavy stock base when I know I'm going to be adding lots of weight to the front of the project.


Daniel R. Boone

lickeyan
PeaFixture

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Posted: 11/26/2012 1:12:33 PM
I usually primarily card stock, or paper that has some weight to it. I have purged most of the flimsy paper from my stash.

Also if the front of my projects are planned on being weighty, I use a heavy card stock or in the case of Daniel's calender, I used the cardboard backing from stacks - because I wanted it to be sturdy.

Good question.

I still kept some less weighty paper, because I loved the color or the pattern. Can't purge all of one thing.



gardencat
Jeepers PEApers

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Posted: 11/26/2012 8:44:32 PM
"I still kept some less weighty paper, because I loved the color or the pattern."

That's part of the problem that I often have...the pattern or colour i want for the base will be a lighter weight and what I want for the front layers will be heavier. I'll get a group of papers picked out to use in a project and then realize it won't work because I have the wrong weight in the wrong place.

Does anyone know of a kind of card stock that has vivid colours on one side and just plain white on the other? A lot of the patterned card stock is like that but most of the plain coloured CS is coloured all the way through.

looser
The Craft Curmudgeon

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Posted: 11/27/2012 10:23:03 AM
Another excellent question! I too would like to know about one-face-colored CS options. Can see so many ways it would be useful.


Daniel R. Boone

howdyheidi
Oh For Peas Sake

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Posted: 11/27/2012 10:42:20 AM
I have a paper pad from K&Co that is colored on one side and white on the other. It is not very thick and I think the cover is torn off so I can't check the weight of the paper.

There are pre folded cards from both Hero Arts and My Minds Eye that are colored on the outside and white within.



~~Heidi~~



gardencat
Jeepers PEApers

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Posted: 11/27/2012 1:34:48 PM
Recollections (Michael's brand) also sold some pre cut cards that are red outside and white inside but they were only in one size and only red. I got a package around Christmas last year but this year hesitated because I like the freedom of being able to decide on the card size myself.

liannallama
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Posted: 11/28/2012 2:27:28 PM
I like to use Gina K paper when there's a lot of embellishments. It hold up to the weight. Also once I took a class with Michael Strong and he lined the inside with a piece of CS if the card has lots of layers.

A Muse Studio has white on one side and the other side is printed with soy ink. It's 80# and it is pressed real hard so it is extra smooth and feels thinner than SU paper but still nice.

I use the A Muse for my simple cards cause I love that I don't have to line it so you can write on a black card!



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Wildheart
A Pea Lassie

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Posted: 11/28/2012 5:41:25 PM
hello my little pea paper friends!

Always love reading your threads Daniel.

weight for sure. if someone said "kraft paper" I visualize what will get wrapped and shipped in the mail. if they said "kraft cardstock" I visualize heavy cardstock to make cards with.



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