Acetate sheets
Post ReplyPost New TopicPosted 12/29/2012 by Christine58 in General Stamping
 

Christine58
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Posted: 12/29/2012 10:34:01 AM
Where can I buy some??? trying to better organize my loose clear stamps.



Some people only dream of angels, I have held one in my arms.





Christinmay
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Posted: 12/29/2012 7:06:03 PM
I saw some once at my local home/craft department store, but haven't seen them since. So they may pop up occasionally at craft stores. Sorry I can't be more helpful. At the moment I just save them from packaging when in decent condition.


Christin

Christine58
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Posted: 12/29/2012 7:38:56 PM
Thanks...I saw some on Amazon if all else fails.



Some people only dream of angels, I have held one in my arms.





birukitty
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Posted: 1/1/2013 5:39:21 PM
I've been using this product since I couldn't find acetate sheet that didn't cost a fortune. It's called Grafix Dura-Lar the acetate alternative. It's better than acetate because it doesn't turn yellow and it's archival quality.

Anyway, it's cheap too! Much cheaper than acetate. I bought the 9x12 sheets that come 25 sheets in a pad. (9x12 is the smallest size they offer, I just cut them down). I use the .005 thickness-it works for me because I slip mine (with the stamps adhered) into a page protector. You might want to go up in your thickness. I bought this product at www.dickblick.com for $8.99.

Hope this helps.

Debbie in MD.


djc
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Posted: 1/6/2013 8:38:13 AM
Be careful of using acetate to store your clear stamps. I believe I've seen threads about the stamps sticking permanently to the acetate--some kind of a chemical reaction. Correct me if I'm wrong about this.

Daria

birukitty
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Posted: 1/6/2013 4:32:36 PM
Daria, I think what you are referring to is the reports from some stampers who stored their unmounted rubber stamps with EZ mount cushioning in plastic CD cases. The acetate in the plastic CD cases had a chemical reaction to the chemicals in the EZ mount foam.

Maybe that's one more reason to try the Dura-Lar acetate alternative? BTW after I wrote my post above I check the site and they do offer it a pack of 81/2 x 11 sheets. That will be my next purchase once I run out of my current pack. Obviously these sheets can be used with clear stamps as well.

I have a ton of unmounted rubber but have never used the EZ mount foam or the CD storage method, but I'm almost positive what I posted above is true. I've read it from several sources.

Debbie in MD.

djc
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Posted: 1/6/2013 6:50:55 PM
Debbie, you're right. That's what I was thinking about. I remember the threads about the CD cases and the warning Sunday International gave to not store EZ Mounted stamps on acetate.

However, I googled acetate + clear stamp storage and found a couple of places where people mentioned problems with storing them on acetate. Here's one that is quite detailed. The blogger mentions that the problem only happened with certain clear stamps, not all.

Daria


Stephanie Barnard
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Posted: 1/6/2013 11:14:04 PM
I think it needs to be mentioned that there are two different types of stamps being called 'clear stamps'.

One type is made overseas. These are also considered/called acrylic stamps.

The other type is made in the USA and made from photopolymer aka resin.

Although they might look similar, they are two different types of stamps. The clear stamps made in the USA are created onto a clear sheet, also known as acetate. (Technically, it is called polyester film, but it can also be called acetate.)

The photopolymer clear stamps can be and should be stored on this type of material. From the descriptions given, it sounds like Dick Blick carries this type of product.

The blog mentioning the 'caution' over clear stamps being stored...the ones mentioned that were 'ruined' are made overseas.

The ones not affected were made in the USA.

If anyone ever has questions about how clear stamps in the USA are made, feel free to ask me. We've been making our own photopolymer stamps for quite awhile now. (For my company and others in the industry). It's a fascinating, yet sticky process.

Hugs,
Stephanie




yellowcherrios
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Posted: 1/7/2013 11:21:13 AM
Very interesting Stephanie! Thank you for sharing! I wish I still had my original packaging to know if my clear stamps are USA made or overseas.

---------------------------

I store my clear stamps on Grafix 0.020 sheets

I chose these sheets since they say they are acid-free. I too was avoiding acetate---since I also store clings on them as well.

On the storage organizing thread, I posted photos---here's a link to the thread: Craft Organizing thread

HTH!!


Melissa

yellowcherrios
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Posted: 1/7/2013 11:24:56 AM
Some of my clear stamps that I have never used--and they are still on the original acetate it was bought on, will be VERY hard to take off the original packaging!!! I feel like I am going to rip the clear stamp!!



Melissa

howdyheidi
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Posted: 1/7/2013 11:45:53 AM
Stephanie, for no good reason I am dying to know how clear stamps are made. My background is in science, although I am now a SAHM, so I love thinking about inks and polymers. lol (PS, love your back2squares stamp!!)

I really love the made in the USA stamps, and I know what people mean when they say the imported ones are hard to get off the background sheet. I have learned to use both kinds.



~~Heidi~~



AngieandSnoopy
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Posted: 1/7/2013 11:57:07 AM
Oh, you don't need to keep the packaging to know WHICH stamps were made in the USA. The ones that truly CLING and are more soft and flexible are made in the USA. The ones that aren't as flexible and do NOT like to cling aren't. This is NOT a good description but the best I can do. I just KNOW by touching!

And Stephanie, I have my eye on a bunch of your stamps! Love your penguins!


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Red, Black & Tan, & Double Dapple mini Dachshund's! Is it Snoopy or Snoopea?
Michel 9, Onkita 14, Jeannie the Chiweenie 14, and Sugar Plum 16 years!

Fiskateer #2358

djc
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Posted: 1/7/2013 12:57:20 PM
Stephanie, I thought that might be the difference between the brands of stamps the blogger mentioned, but wasn't sure. I can also attest to the higher quality of photopolymer stamps compared to other clear stamps. I believe that the clear stamps made in the UK are also made of photopolymer.

I still prefer rubber, but the photopolymer stamps that I have seem to be holding up well and stamp fine. The other clear stamps don't last. Even if I don't use them, I notice that they deteriorate and some have torn as I remove them from the clear sheet they came on.

It's nice to know that the photopolymer stamps can be stored on acetate.

Daria

Stephanie Barnard
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Posted: 1/8/2013 12:23:06 AM
Hi All...

Sorry, CHA craziness today, so I'm just getting back to this thread. Thanks for your kind words about my stamps.

Yes, there is at least one company in the UK that makes photopolymer stamps. Sorry, forgot to mention that.

Heidi....


The short version:

Besides a computer to create the files, it takes six different machines to make the stamps. After the negative is made, it takes approx. 1.5 hours to 'cook' the stamps.

Of course, they aren't really 'cooked', but that's the best way to describe it. Clear liquid resin is poured onto one machine and is exposed to UV light at various times in the process. It is then washed of the extra resin.

It's then dried, exposed to more UV lights while in an acid type bath, dried again, cleaned and then cut, labeled and packaged.

The clear resin is like honey. Get it on your clothing...it's there for life...doesn't wash out. The workers have to mop everyday, otherwise the floor is a mess.

My favorite part? The SMELL! I love it! It's like a fresh stamp sheet! Visitors are freaked out about it, but to me it smells divine. hahaha....When I teach classes at our facility, we have air fresheners, but stampers don't complain.

My other favorite part? Designing stamps at night and testing the stamp the next night. I don't go into that office very often (I design/work from home 99% of the time or I'm working at the Sizzix office.) I go into our office about an hour a week to visit with the employees, check on inventory, etc.

Yikes, sorry this is so long!

Hugs,
Stephanie



howdyheidi
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Posted: 1/8/2013 9:29:40 PM
Thanks so much for the great explanation on how the process works! It is very interesting. I hunted around the internet and quizzed my DH on some particulars I couldn't remember and I think I understand pretty well now. I still want to know exactly what is in that resin, but I imagine you purchase it and the composition is proprietary anyhow.

Thanks for taking the time!

PS, I love the smell too! Kindof like new car smell, but new stamp smell.


~~Heidi~~


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