Got a few minutes?
Post ReplyPost New TopicPosted 1/22/2013 by looser in General Stamping
 

looser
The Craft Curmudgeon

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Posted: 1/22/2013 12:43:20 PM
I had a delightful (landline) conversation with my dear friend Leslie (aka Taysnanna) yesterday.

She attended the CHA Winter Expo--working in the OWH booth.

As usual our topics were all over the place. But one topic--Cre8time--caught my attention.

Leslie shared what she knew about this CHA-sponsored program & I did a bit of web-search to see what I could learn as well (not much).

Anyhoo... The idea seems to be that craft retailers can provide customers with ways to free up more time-to-craft. Even if it's just 8 minutes @ a time or per day. They seem to be going the 'cumulative' route--the minutes add up 'til you have a completed project by working just a few minutes per day.

Sounds good doesn't it? We all have a few odd minutes free during our day. Don't we?

OK! I admit I'm 'messing' with you! Crafts like stamping can indeed be worked on with a few minutes, but there's a big BUT that I see.

That 'BUT' is that it requires an 'in place' set-up so we can accomplish something in those 8 minutes. Most of us do our crafting where we have the space & have to clean up so we can eat dinner @ the table!

So... How do (or would) you tackle the idea of having 8 minutes to craft (stamping especially) in a relistic manner?


Daniel R. Boone

howdyheidi
Oh For Peas Sake

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Posted: 1/22/2013 1:34:40 PM
Thanks for sharing, I had not heard of this! hmmm.

Well, this is where my small crafty space comes in handy. It is all just shut up in the repurposed computer armoire.

Another way I think you can find some time to craft is to make it a reward for finishing a necessary task, such as your errands, cleaning, etc. This helps me with motivation sometimes, and if I know I can use my extra time for crafting, I often complete my tasks quicker. So it is win/win. That isn't possible every day, but often for me...

eta: I found the facebook page for Cre8time.


~~Heidi~~



liannallama
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Posted: 1/22/2013 4:26:19 PM
Seriously? Leslie is taysnana? Leslie did you tell me that last year and I forgot lol?

Anyways I think that's funny because I worked in the booth with her all week with ozzigirl too!

I missed the 8 thing I will have to think if that will work for me I do have a dedicated space and it seems like I take multiple sessions to complete something but somehow I think it's more than eight minutes at a time.


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yellowcherrios
StuckOnPeas

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Posted: 1/22/2013 5:48:45 PM
This kinda sounds like the exercise thing--where you exercise 10 min at a time and try to fit in 3 sessions or something like that....

Not sure if 8 min would work for me---I'd want to keep "playing"!! I also have a table that ~can~ be left up while I work on something for a few days and then cleared off and folded down to allow for more space in the room. It usually just stays up though...

It seems to me that 8 min sessions may really be good for some--help them get into stamping/scrapbooking/other crafts and not be so overwhelmed by the idea of crafting on something. I should try this with knitting.....


Melissa

stampwilly
StuckOnPeas

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Posted: 1/22/2013 9:50:22 PM
8 min. won't work for me either. I like to finish up something once I start. But this is a good idea for those that have a super busy schedule and this will help them complete a project in a few sessions.

Stampwilly

gardencat
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Posted: 1/23/2013 6:26:30 AM
There are days when I carve out whole hours to work on projects but I do a lot of my crafting in small segments of time too. I'll put the kettle on to make tea and while waiting for it to come to a boil I'll go and stamp one image or punch a couple of border strips. Or maybe I'll put some really crusty pans in the sink to soak, and then go do one step in a project while the dirt is loosening. I have a craft room upstairs but also a table set up in the family room near the kitchen and that is where I do that 'few minutes' crafting.

The thing is, that I find now I am doing most of my crafting, at that table, because that is where most of my current projects and tools end up and my upstairs room tends to be used more and more for storage of items I'm not really using right now and, clean up, which honestly, is always an issue for me, gets even more behind because I tend to do the one crafty thing I'm focused on and then go back to the kitchen or laundry room leaving all the tools and things higgely piggely all over the place.

Not sure what the answer is except, I guess, being more disciplined.

howdyheidi
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Posted: 1/23/2013 8:01:56 AM
Okay, found the website
http://www.cre8time.org/

It seems like it is not necessarily 8 minutes at a time, but finding 8 hours a month for creative activities, whether in small chunks, or 2 hours each Saturday, etc...


~~Heidi~~



looser
The Craft Curmudgeon

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Posted: 1/23/2013 9:43:18 AM
Yes, Heidi. My use of the '8 minutes' was a simplification of the concept. Sorry if it confused anyone.

Apart from the 'need' to have a setup at the ready, there's another aspect of this program--as I understand it--that has me wondered...

It appears that the program is geared to providing ways to free up more time to craft. That's ok, but I really don't need more advice on that subject thank you very much. What I would much prefer is mfrs/retailers providing me with suggestions to better use the miinutes I have.

One thing that might be useful would be for a project designer to break the project instructions into 'time bits' when writing the instructions. Better still? Designers/teachers could show me how to break a project into doable bits on my own--the old 'teach me to fish' idea.

Granted. Many of us already do that sort of thing, but there are many who find it difficult to start a project if they're unable to complete it in one sitting. And there are lots of valid reasons for not wanting to take lots of time--days/weeks--to complete a project. Note. I'm not talking about creating huge projects. I'm talking about projects such as cards, tags, etc.

Tips on how to create a setup that can be stowed would also help many of the 'space challenged'.

Looks like we have the start of that on this thread. Might be helful to keep it going so chime in with your suggestions & stuff you've done along these lines. OK?


Daniel R. Boone

RubyRubbler
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Posted: 1/23/2013 9:46:01 AM
I love this!
Thanks for bringing it up.




Be sure to check out my blog at http://michellezerull.blogspot.com/

howdyheidi
Oh For Peas Sake

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Posted: 1/24/2013 8:33:46 AM
Daniel, I think that is an excellent new way of teaching that the manufacturers could try. I watch quite a lot of instructional videos for stamping and crafting, etc, and none of them have had the point of view of breaking a project up into small bits so you can do the project in more than one sitting.

This Cre8time thing does have sponsors (and how is it a charity??? but that is for another thread) but so far I haven't seen anything more than "tips." Maybe I am not looking in the right place.

I do still like the concept of people taking time for creativity. It really can be therapeutic in addition to being a fun hobby.


~~Heidi~~



gardencat
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Posted: 1/24/2013 9:29:17 AM
One thing that I do like about working on a project in pieces, or chunks of time, is that it gives more time for ideas to form.

I guess a lot of people may know, when they start a project, exactly what they want the finished item to look like but I often don't. I have an overall idea of where I am trying to go but I often don't have a nailed down plan of how I am going to do every step.

Working on one part, and then going off to do something else, gives me time to turn ideas over, in my mind, before I approach the next step. Sometimes it will just give me a chance to figure out the technical aspects of how to get what I want, other times it may lead me to take the project in an entirely different direction.

Also folding laundry or doing dishes is less boring if my mind is occupied with my craft project. Of course being preoccupied like that cam sometimes lead to absentminded actions like putting the clean socks in the fridge...maybe not a bad idea in the summer but definitely not appreciated in this weather.

yellowcherrios
StuckOnPeas

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Posted: 1/24/2013 9:53:56 AM
LOL gardencat! That is funny about the chilled socks!

But I do like that idea Gardencat is talkin' about. When I ~have~ to take a moment and stop working on a card---mainly b/c something is drying on the card before proceeding---I do think of other ideas for that particular card.

Daniel, when you mentioned printing times along the side of the crafting instructions, that makes me think of recipes! Some recipes will do such a thing and show how long one step will take (I usually double the time shown to be safe!)---but it does allow you to maybe plan around a step in the recipe--say, allowing an hour for the bread loaf to rise, so you do some loads of dishes in-between. I can see that working also for crafting; especially if you have not done the craft/project before. But I can really only seeing the time thing working with a COMPLETE project---meaning, you see a "recipe" for a project and you say "I want to make exactly that!" Then you follow along with the craft recipe and are able to complete the project in the amount of time stated. But if you wanted to apply a craft recipe to a project you're working on or maybe an idea you have, then the times would only be references, at most, for you, rather than actual time to complete perhaps. (but that's not to say that time markings still couldn't be helpful!)

With my cards though, I will start out with something key in the card I want to do: maybe it's a technique, a stamp I haven't used before, a theme, a die cut, etc. that I want in the card. I then either start thinking of what else will go with this idea OR I start working on that part of the card and other ideas will come while I work on the card. I very very rarely think of a completed card and see it in my mind and then go make it (I can only think of one time right now that I have done that)---it usually does not come out as I SAW it in my mind! For me, I only start out with that one key thing I want to do and then go from there.

Hmm....this has me thinking....I'll more in a second!



Melissa

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StuckOnPeas

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Posted: 1/24/2013 10:13:03 AM
ok back from the dishes----In my last post, started to think about following along with a project recipe vs following along with a sewing pattern.

I have no problem following along, "copying" a sewing pattern--well copying as far as you can, since you cannot get the same fabric pattern as shown on the pattern cover.... but when it comes to following a card sketch (I guess that'd be the equivalent) I have THE hardest time!! Maybe it's b/c sewing pattern have parts you cut out, whereas the card sketch does not give you parts to use already in front of you....not sure.

Sometimes I think it has to with how I make cards--the card is formed ~while~ I am making the card (if that makes sense). With a card sketch, one large part of it is really already done (and done by someone else usually), except colors need to be chosen and a theme---and I guess I have a hard time fitting those need-to-determine-still elements into a predetermined sketch.

I usually take something I see in a card I like (technique, colors used) and apply it to my card, rather than copying the card exactly.

AND to try to bring this back to the subject at hand--- (sorry Daniel!)---I was thinking about why I have trouble following projects for card making that companies publish--not sure the project designers can really help with my problem ---this is just something I practice on when I do sketch challenges...which reminds me I need to do Christin's to practice more with this!


Melissa

looser
The Craft Curmudgeon

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Posted: 1/24/2013 11:11:31 AM
Sheesh, Melissa! Nothing was off-track in your--so short--posts! TFS.

Here's a suggestion for ways to deal with WIP (work in progress) when you have to move them off the kitchen/dining table... Use 'trays' as dedicated project-holders.

Find some good sized plastic trays that have a bit of a 'lip'. From cardboard boxes, cut a 'lid' for each tray. Now you can use the tray to hold the materials & the project while working on it. Then you can put the lid on & store it when necessary. I would make a lid label that tells me what the project is & when I worked on it last. If I have more than 1 WIP, the cardboard lid lets me stack the trays.

Even those who have craft areas can use the trays to organize their work.


Daniel R. Boone

liannallama
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Posted: 1/24/2013 11:57:26 PM
I've been thinking about this (and now I'm at home where I can type instead of pecking letters on my phone!)

Many times I find myself doing things in piecework for my classes. Especially if I'm tired but I know I have to get the kits ready. So one time I will collect the envies and bag them. Then I will get the papers/stamps I want put together. If I'm really tired I will make a sketch and set it aside for the next session. Usually designing and assembling a card will be one session but sometimes I will assemble without coloring and save that for my lunch break since it is easy to bring a few markers and color in my car. Then another session will be cutting all the pieces and scoring the card bases.

I think a lot of altered artists do this piecemeal method since they like to gesso everything or glue pages together before they ever start. Then another time they will make backgrounds to dry all at once. Having to wait for drying paint forces you to craft in pieces!

For me, once I start I usually don't want to stop (unless it's going poorly) and if I know I don't have that much time/energy I won't even start. Sometimes I will stamp my image to color later or make pieces that need to be cut out. (when I used to do a lot of swaps I always seemed to end up cutting intricate pieces in front of the TV. Once I crocheted edges on a bunch of ATCs and wasn't that a chore!)

Anyways, I digress (and I'm out of time/energy for the night--maybe I shouldn't even have started, LOL!)



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