Let's talk about funding for Public television

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Posted 10/4/2012 by *Jenny* in NSBR Board
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*Jenny*
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Posted: 10/4/2012 7:58:16 PM

I would pay more taxes rather than borrow more money from China.
But that's not really on the table, is it?


- Jenny


Sue_Pea
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Posted: 10/4/2012 8:05:25 PM
I like PBS. I send them money and I do not want them to see them taken over and made for profit.

Instead of Masterpiece Classic, we'd end up with some version of Hoarders, Parking Wars, Honey Boo-Boo, or other equally inane, crappy reality shows.

No thanks.


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*Jenny*
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Posted: 10/4/2012 8:13:39 PM

I know the research on public broadcasting, know it well, and will support whatever I can to continue to increase educational opportunities and experiences for children, esp low income children.
I found the PBS Audience demographics (for 2009) because I really wanted to see "who" the audience really was. I thought you'd find this interesting.


PBS Audience Demographics


PBS Audience Demographics

63% of total adult viewers are between 18-54 years of age

37% of total adult viewers are 55+

58% of viewers are married

51% of audience is male; 49% is female

11% of viewers are of Spanish/Hispanic origin

12% of viewers are African-American

63% of audience use the Internet

37% of total adult viewers have one or more college degrees

15% of total adult viewers hold graduate degrees

68% of audience votes regularly

Financial Characteristics

36% have a household income of $75,000+

29% have a household income of $125,000+

8% have a household income of $200,000+

75% of viewing households have an ATM card

49% have an IRA/Keogh account

73% are homeowners

31% have auto loans

28% have liquid assets in excess of $100,000

And a strong majority of Public Television viewers:

Feel that companies that support public television have a commitment to quality and excellence.

Believe underwriters are usually industry leaders.

Would choose to buy a product from a company that supports public television, all other things being equal.

Sources: 2009 GfK Roper Public Affairs & Media survey comparing public service institutions; and Nielsen Media Research.

link

So according to this, the demographics could be counting an adult home with children who are watching, but it does not in any way indicate that PBS is what low income people rely on.



- Jenny


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Posted: 10/4/2012 8:13:53 PM
Cuts are going to have to be made and I say cutting public tv is a great place to start. It is a left-wing biased dinosaur. Programs that are worthwhile will be picked up by another tv outlet and funding can come through ads.
If the open spaces don't get many channels, then it is a good place to sell dish network reception. Perhaps this is a good place for some entrepreneur to go to.
NPR is pretty worthless and, again, so liberal that they fired Juan Williams!
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mapchic
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Posted: 10/4/2012 8:33:26 PM

But I'm incredibly biased as I've strongly considered working as a PhD for the Sesame Street Foundation (Sesame Workshop) and know people who do. I know the research on public broadcasting, know it well, and will support whatever I can to continue to increase educational opportunities and experiences for children, esp low income children.
This is the thing... Sesame Workshop makes TONS of money in licensing the use of it's characters. There is no reason on earth that Big Bird should be on welfare when he is a millionaire.

The part that is really distasteful to me is that Sesame cloaks itself in some sort of claim that they are all about education for low income children while making millions off overpriced non educational poorly made products.

I am A-ok with Sesame being tax free because they are non-profit. However for them to get money from the government is ridiculous.




"When someone asks you 'think about what Jesus would do', remember that a valid option is to freak out and turn over tables" -- Unknown

“I am a Roman Catholic - the one true faith, (the Microsoft of Christianity) and I know Roman Catholicism is the one true faith because Roman Catholicism tells me it’s the one true faith... And if you remember from earlier in this sentence Roman Catholicism is the one true faith – so how could it be wrong?” ~ Stephen Colbert ‘The Word’ 11-28-06

Vocatus atque non vocatus, Deus aderit

Dani-Mani
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Posted: 10/4/2012 8:44:35 PM
Where on earth did I say low income families rely on PBS?

That's why I hate these threads. If someone doesn't agree with you, they twist your words to fit what point they want to say.

I'll say it again.

I know the research on public broadcasting. I will continue to support whatever I need to do increase educational opportunities for children, especially low income children.



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crimsoncat05
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Posted: 10/4/2012 8:45:26 PM
lets see, the government subsidizes... the

privately owned train system in the US
privately owned farms and mega farms in the US
has repeatedly bailed out the privately owned airlines in the US
privately owned oil companies in the US


and you all want to start the "drop in the bucket" penny pinching at the children's and elderly's expense.

Do you realize most of the rural US depends on PBS for it's news, farm reports, childrens programing and cultural programs? Most of us still use antennas to get the only one or two channels we have access to.

I've yet to see any of those "other" entities mentioned on this thread but by all means, lets go after PBS.



...huh since no one's answered the points raised in your post, I guess no one saw it-- maybe this time they will!




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2peafaithful
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Posted: 10/4/2012 8:48:03 PM
I love PBS.

Borrow money for it??? Heck no! That is all kind of crazy!


missbitts
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Posted: 10/4/2012 8:51:08 PM

I would pay more taxes rather than borrow more money from China.


Good news for you then! Take whatever you'd be willing to spend in increased taxes and send it along to public t.v. It's even better than doing it as a tax because 100% of your donation will go to them this way.


I've yet to see any of those "other" entities mentioned on this thread but by all means, lets go after PBS.


It's the topic of the thread -- right there in the title. These other subsidies, however, according to Romney, would get put to the same test. Some of them will pass, some won't; not all subsidies are created equal. IMO, all of them can be severely cut or eliminated as federal subsidies. The states can decide for themselves after that.

mapchic
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Posted: 10/4/2012 9:01:50 PM


lets see, the government subsidizes... the

privately owned train system in the US
privately owned farms and mega farms in the US
has repeatedly bailed out the privately owned airlines in the US
privately owned oil companies in the US


and you all want to start the "drop in the bucket" penny pinching at the children's and elderly's expense.

Do you realize most of the rural US depends on PBS for it's news, farm reports, childrens programing and cultural programs? Most of us still use antennas to get the only one or two channels we have access to.

I've yet to see any of those "other" entities mentioned on this thread but by all means, lets go after PBS.



...huh since no one's answered the points raised in your post, I guess no one saw it-- maybe this time they will!
I saw this but hadn't gotten around to responding. But since responding to this one post is so darn important...

I think it's a bit of a red herring to list all these different industries (with a strange focus on their private ownership) in a conversation that has thus far been focused on the one topic of the CPB.

I will say that I am 100% for the cutting of federal funding for Amtrack and farm subsidies... though I highly doubt rural people will appreciate either of those positions.

I also firmly believe that banks, auto companies, airlines and the oil industry should all succeed or fail without federal welfare. As far as I am concerned cut them all.

I am up for the 'drop in the bucket' penny pinching from all possible corners. If somebody wants to start a thread of people talking about what federal government programs they would like to cut that could be an interesting discussion.

CPB/PBS/NPR is just one of the drops which will hopefully fill up the bucket of savings which well start to get us out of this financial hole we are presently in.




"When someone asks you 'think about what Jesus would do', remember that a valid option is to freak out and turn over tables" -- Unknown

“I am a Roman Catholic - the one true faith, (the Microsoft of Christianity) and I know Roman Catholicism is the one true faith because Roman Catholicism tells me it’s the one true faith... And if you remember from earlier in this sentence Roman Catholicism is the one true faith – so how could it be wrong?” ~ Stephen Colbert ‘The Word’ 11-28-06

Vocatus atque non vocatus, Deus aderit

*Jenny*
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Posted: 10/4/2012 9:05:02 PM

Where on earth did I say low income families rely on PBS?

That's why I hate these threads. If someone doesn't agree with you, they twist your words to fit what point they want to say.

I'll say it again.

I know the research on public broadcasting. I will continue to support whatever I need to do increase educational opportunities for children, especially low income children.

My apologies. When you mentioned "low income children" I assumed you meant that to include low income families. I am not really sure what you took such offense to. I was not twisting your words.

Do the "educational opportunities" of which you speak only include public funding of CPB? What if that money was used to hire teachers or some other more direct way to help children in need of a good education?

Like someone said...big bird is s millionaire...why is he getting welfare?


- Jenny


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Posted: 10/4/2012 9:29:32 PM
I guess the big thing for me--is that we don't borrow any more money from China! Be it a drop or a bucketful--if we don't have the money, then we don't fund tv.



TheBiscuitScraps
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Posted: 10/4/2012 9:42:47 PM


It wasn't a good idea for Romney to say he would cut off Big Bird.

Link to article


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Posted: 10/4/2012 9:49:09 PM
Sesame Street funding


Although it was originally funded by the Carnegie Corporation and the United States Office of Education, the majority of the Workshop's funding is now earned through licensing the use of their characters to a variety of corporations to use for books, toys, and other products marketed toward children. This ensures that the Workshop has reliable access to funding for its programming without depending on unpredictable grants.


Here's how much federal funding CTW is getting:

CNN blog link

dynalady
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Posted: 10/4/2012 10:37:55 PM
There is no question every little bit helps. What I object to cutting funding for something that is beneficial to our children and a good portion of the population, while funding foreign aid. Stopping that would be a substantial help. Why is it we want to cut only those things that will hurt our own people?







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Posted: 10/4/2012 10:41:09 PM

What I object to cutting funding for something that is beneficial to our children and a good portion of the population, while funding foreign aid. Stopping that would be a substantial help.


Agreed. You simply do not lend money that you do not have.

What we need is a Presidential candidate who is a mom that has struggled to balance her family's budget - and succeeded even if it meant driving a used car and cutting out dance classes, filet mignon, and the cleaning lady.


Carla




mapchic
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Posted: 10/4/2012 10:49:04 PM

There is no question every little bit helps. What I object to cutting funding for something that is beneficial to our children and a good portion of the population, while funding foreign aid. Stopping that would be a substantial help. Why is it we want to cut only those things that will hurt our own people?
I don't think anyone here is saying that we should cut CPB but nothing else.

I vote that we cut funding of the CPB (and lots and lots of other things) along with cutting (deeply) into foreign aid.




"When someone asks you 'think about what Jesus would do', remember that a valid option is to freak out and turn over tables" -- Unknown

“I am a Roman Catholic - the one true faith, (the Microsoft of Christianity) and I know Roman Catholicism is the one true faith because Roman Catholicism tells me it’s the one true faith... And if you remember from earlier in this sentence Roman Catholicism is the one true faith – so how could it be wrong?” ~ Stephen Colbert ‘The Word’ 11-28-06

Vocatus atque non vocatus, Deus aderit

GIPfunny

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Posted: 10/4/2012 10:52:19 PM
I don't have a strong opinion one way or the other. The pictures posted on facebook have been quite funny.






linda~lou
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Posted: 10/4/2012 11:52:27 PM
Without PBS I'd have no Downton Abby!


linda



Burning Feather
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Posted: 10/5/2012 12:50:22 AM

Without PBS I'd have no Downton Abby!


And not directed at you specifically, but what exactly IS the benefit - socially - of Downtown Abbey that makes it something that would be supported by a PBS station? Why should a show like that be on a government supported channel?

It could be commercially successful on a network channel obviously and it's not like it's some sort of educational required viewing for poor urban children.

I think many of the shows fall into the fictional entertainment category and I think that alone is one major problem I have with tax dollars being used (and borrowed at that!) to support that channel.



Carla




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Posted: 10/5/2012 1:07:56 AM
I think that the mainstream popularity of Downton Abbey probably accounts for a lot of donations from people who wouldn't otherwise prioritize donating. I know I feel guilty for not donating more than I already do.

Also, Downton Abbey is sponsored by corporate and private donations, including resources in the UK:


Funding for the series is provided by Viking River Cruises and Ralph Lauren Corporation, with additional support from public television viewers and contributors to The Masterpiece Trust, created to help ensure the series' future.


Maybe government $ is included in that; I don't know.

Interesting essay

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Posted: 10/5/2012 1:24:18 AM
If we cut our budget where conservatives want to cut, and spend where they want to spend, in another generation this place will look like a 3rd world country domestically, along with armed guards at all the borders and nonstop wars in the Middle East.

No thanks. I vote for more culture and fewer wars.


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Posted: 10/5/2012 1:34:28 AM
Lucy - what a patently absurd assertion.



angievp
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Posted: 10/5/2012 4:09:58 AM
I think it was a comment he thought it was funny but he managed to touch a nerve on a deeper scale. For me, it's not about Big Bird per se, but it's about the greater idea of sponsoring and nurturing art and cultural programs.

I think there are lots of other things we need to think about cutting before Big Bird et al gets the axe:



All those wonderful perks they get--from travel to their own barber (if you would recall the 230,000 of taxpayer dollars that went to pay for the shortfall).
Cut the spending from the Princes of Pork--i.e., those wonderful little earmarks that manage to find themselves into the federal budget--for example, the recent infamous 17K drip pans made by a company who are political contributors to a congressman from kentucky.






VirginiaGomes
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Posted: 10/5/2012 6:53:06 AM
I was thinking the same thing. Besides, who cares about commercials when you have a DVR recorder? Just skip them!


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melanell
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Posted: 10/5/2012 7:04:28 AM

I say cut it and let private industry fund it. I also am so tired of the commercials to donate.



Perhaps if you and others like you actually did donate instead of just watching and complaining PBS wouldn't need federal funding. Hmmmm.



We do donate, and guess what, I still hate the fund-raising drives. They're freaking annoying.





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Posted: 10/5/2012 7:11:09 AM
Lucy, really?

SMH


- Jenny


*Erin
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Posted: 10/5/2012 7:24:55 AM

I think it was a comment he thought it was funny but he managed to touch a nerve on a deeper scale. For me, it's not about Big Bird per se, but it's about the greater idea of sponsoring and nurturing art and cultural programs.


I agree. I missed the live debate, but I can't believe we're back to cutting funding to public television.

I forget who asked about Downton Abbey (I've never seen it so I don't have a particular opinion on it), but although it might not be a hugely important show, a lot of people like it and I think its appeal boils down to the fact that it isn't more of the same reality yuck that Hollywood churns out and force-feeds us in massive quantities. If for no other reason, we need an alternative to that. And if Downton Abbey isn't to your taste, what about the numerous history, science, news and arts shows? Here's a listing: PBS programs. I love PBS and it's worth funding, in my opinion.

ETA: Ooops, sorry BF! It was you who asked; I just couldn't remember by the time I went to type my response. And to answer why it should be on PBS and not some other channel, I'm not sure. It's part of Masterpiece Theater and I think it belongs there. It's the kind of thing they show. Also, I think no other channel would buy it because their audience wouldn't like it. I can't see anyone who enjoys watching Honey Boo Boo sitting down for a period piece about aristocrats set in post-Edwardian England. I could be wrong, though. Perhaps there is some cross-over appeal but I don't think there's a lot.



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Posted: 10/5/2012 7:52:25 AM

If we cut our budget where conservatives want to cut, and spend where they want to spend, in another generation this place will look like a 3rd world country domestically, along with armed guards at all the borders and nonstop wars in the Middle East.

No thanks. I vote for more culture and fewer wars.




AND depending on where you live, no easy access to birth control, training programs, Head Start for children, AND by god every Tom, Dick and Harry will be locked and loaded.....I completely agree Lucy and it shouldn't come as a surprise or be absurd that we think that way.

ETA: No, I don't think funding to PBS should be cut. We donate every year, yet the only program that I watch on a somewhat regular basis is Frontline.....no Big Bird watching in this household anymore.





*maureen*
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Posted: 10/5/2012 7:52:55 AM


I can't see anyone who enjoys watching Honey Boo Boo sitting down for a period piece about aristocrats set in post-Edwardian England. I could be wrong, though. Perhaps there is some cross-over appeal but I don't think there's a lot.


I enjoy both Honey Boo Boo and "intellectual" television as well. I also think you nailed a bigger issue with PBS without even meaning to do so. When PBS was conceived it was the "high brow" intellectual channel and the only gig in town for that type of programming. Now with the invent of cable tv and satellite tv, I can watch the same types of shows on multiple channels. PBS needs now to change with the times and in some ways it has changed. Corporate sponsors for shows and limited commercial endorsements have help the burden of running PBS. But in this economy, we need to make choices and TV stations should come under scrutiny along with many of the other issues offered in this thread. We the citizens are funding too many unnecessarily burdensome projects. We need to stream line our spending because while I won't complain about paying more in taxes to ensure everyone has healthcare, I do personally draw the line with funding television.

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Posted: 10/5/2012 8:33:37 AM
I live in a rural, one stoplight community.

We have lived here over a decade and have yet to meet one household that does not have cable (or DISH) for television unless they don't have a TV in their home by choice.

My dh works in health care in a prison for an impoverished population that averages well under $30,000/household (Because of the distance, he lives in that community during the wk). He has yet to know/hear of any household there without cable either.






Do you realize most of the rural US depends on PBS for it's news, farm reports, childrens programing and cultural programs? Most of us still use antennas to get the only one or two channels we have access to.



I have to respectfully disagree with the "most" words in that statement. There MAY still be some rural communities like that, but around here if we want local news, farm reports etc we listen to radio (several to choose from besides NPR). With the availability of the internet, so MUCH has changed in how people in rural communities get their information!

I watch PBS more than any other network TV - and I think it would continue just fine without government funding.



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Posted: 10/5/2012 8:48:58 AM

I forget who asked about Downton Abbey (I've never seen it so I don't have a particular opinion on it), but although it might not be a hugely important show, a lot of people like it and I think its appeal boils down to the fact that it isn't more of the same reality yuck that Hollywood churns out and force-feeds us in massive quantities. If for no other reason, we need an alternative to that. And if Downton Abbey isn't to your taste, what about the numerous history, science, news and arts shows? Here's a listing: PBS programs. I love PBS and it's worth funding, in my opinion.

ETA: Ooops, sorry BF! It was you who asked; I just couldn't remember by the time I went to type my response. And to answer why it should be on PBS and not some other channel, I'm not sure. It's part of Masterpiece Theater and I think it belongs there. It's the kind of thing they show. Also, I think no other channel would buy it because their audience wouldn't like it. I can't see anyone who enjoys watching Honey Boo Boo sitting down for a period piece about aristocrats set in post-Edwardian England. I could be wrong, though. Perhaps there is some cross-over appeal but I don't think there's a lot.


The fact that it's high brow, quality programing that is popular isn't enough to be funded in any way by the United States government, especially when we have such a large deficit.

I may enjoy going to the theater, but I don't do it when I can't afford feed my own family.

Yes, arts and culture should be cut. Along with many other larger things - for sure, but in my mind, it's not an either/or situation - it's a situation of cutting every single thing to get ourselves under some sort of control and then we can talk about adding them back into the Federal budget.

If I'm being asked to tighten my belt and hand over more of our hard earned money to taxes, I don't particularly want to do it so that people can enjoy what they perceive to be "better than the rest of you" programming.


Carla




CarefreeSadie
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Posted: 10/5/2012 9:21:08 AM
Well this is interesting. I get IPBS through my satellite subscription. Does that mean since I also pay for it with my taxes through government funding that Dish network just gives it to me for free? Or am I paying for it twice? I pay for it in my local programming package, cause I was just kidding that Dish would give me programming out of the goodness of their hearts. So is IPBS getting money from Dish and the government and from donations?

Darcy_Collins
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Posted: 10/5/2012 9:48:14 AM

If we cut our budget where conservatives want to cut, and spend where they want to spend, in another generation this place will look like a 3rd world country domestically, along with armed guards at all the borders and nonstop wars in the Middle East.


If we spend our budget where liberals want to spend, and cut where they want to cut, in another generation this place will be bankrupt domestically, and conquered, along with armed guards......

Can't you see how ridiculous and unhelpful hyperobole is? This thread began as a relatively straitforward discussion about whether public television should be funded with tax dollars - there are reasonable pros and cons to both sides - what's the point in throwing out the wild assertions that fiscal conservatives want to have our poor living like in third world countries and non-stop wars. It's as ridiculous as the hyerbole about liberals.


***warning - I'm using hyperbole about liberals to show how ridiculous Lucy's hyperbole is about conservatives-don't post a bunch of garbage about how my hyperbole is wrong - of course it's wrong that's the POINT.

edited as I forgot to swap the conservatives for liberals in my response - doh!


*Jenny*
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Posted: 10/5/2012 10:12:32 AM

This thread began as a relatively straitforward discussion about whether public television should be funded with tax dollars - there are reasonable pros and cons to both sides
Exactly. Discussion about anything is impossible anymore without it becoming left vs. right...us vs. them.

It's really no wonder Washington has such a difficult time as well if we can't even have a discussion here without the kind of hostility we've seen here.

There are peas I expect the hostility from. (and I'm not only talking the left...the hostility and frothing is abundant on both sides) But there are peas that I actually expect to disagree with that I still very much enjoy reading what they have to say...well most of the time.

I wanted discussion. Not finger pointing, name calling and doomsday propoganda. But this is 2peas and you get what you get.


- Jenny


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Posted: 10/5/2012 10:27:43 AM

I will say that I am 100% for the cutting of federal funding for Amtrack and farm subsidies... though I highly doubt rural people will appreciate either of those positions


I live right in the middle of farm country, and it would be more than rural people who would feel this - the price of groceries would skyrocket. That said, I don't believe farmers should be getting the huge subsidies they are getting.


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Posted: 10/5/2012 11:15:49 AM

If we cut our budget where conservatives want to cut, and spend where they want to spend, in another generation this place will look like a 3rd world country domestically, along with armed guards at all the borders and nonstop wars in the Middle East.

No thanks. I vote for more culture and fewer wars.


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Sparehead3
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Posted: 10/5/2012 11:35:34 AM
I wonder when plopping your kid in front of the TV to watch Sesame Street became educational. It seems kind of against the current trend of getting kids to move more and eat well (considering the shows are brought to you in part by McDonalds...). Is there any actual research that shows watching Sesame Street makes kids smarter or do better in school? I doubt it...


Also if new episodes of Sesame Street were not made, they do have 40+ seasons they could show in reruns if it is such a great educational tool.

Why the focus on "killing Big Bird?" why not focus on no more Elmo!

sunny 5
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Posted: 10/5/2012 11:58:02 AM
there is research to show that sesame street and such programs enhances the literacy of kids...esp important in homes where english is not spoken. preschools also use these programs to engage kids.

sesame street also promotes versions of its show in many countries around the world..helping to promote education and literacy for all. this alone is worth funding...as the more educated everyone is, the better off we will be.


tlc0963
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Posted: 10/5/2012 12:00:06 PM

I'd ask myself, "Is it worth raising my taxes to pay for this?"


That's fine IF it only affects you and your family's budget / wallet. But, my answer is not the same; I do NOT think it is worth raising MY taxes for.

And, I also do NOT appreciate your assumption that if it is worth raising your taxes for that I and everyone else agree or would be fine with that. I am NOT.

The Fed should not be involved.


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LisaEDesign
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Posted: 10/5/2012 12:35:44 PM
We don't have cable and we do watch some public television (Washington Week and a few of the British programs). We don't have cable because there is absolutely NOTHING on cable television I would spend a penny on although I do watch one or two cable shows from ABC Family on-line.

I also wouldn't spend any money to watch PBS. It is there and free just like our other network channels we get through our antennae. I am not going to give them money though. I don't find it that interesting or valuable.

Personally I think it ought to be phased out of the federal budget. Give them a deadline - say 5 years and reduce the federal contribution 20% per year. Then they can get advertising or contributions or they can fade away if they can't compete.

There are many things the government does need to pay for but I don't see anything on PBS that fits that category. I have to admit though I've never watched Sesame Street so I have no opinion on the value of Big Bird.


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Nancie52
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Posted: 10/5/2012 1:10:08 PM

I also firmly believe that banks, auto companies, airlines and the oil industry should all succeed or fail without federal welfare. As far as I am concerned cut them all


ITA^^^

I also feel that the "killing of Big Bird" is going to hurt Gov Romney.. Note the post and link above with the child's letter to the Governor. all really taken out of context...I literally saw that coming..... I wish he'd chosen another option to cut ... since it involves children, it's going to be very controversial and people are not going to even begin to understand that it's just ONE of the places to start... One of the producers, or a Sesame St "person" assured the public last night that "No, Big Bird is not going to die'> he's here... not to worry..

crimsoncat05
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Posted: 10/5/2012 1:11:42 PM
I wonder when plopping your kid in front of the TV to watch Sesame Street became educational. It seems kind of against the current trend of getting kids to move more and eat well (considering the shows are brought to you in part by McDonalds...). Is there any actual research that shows watching Sesame Street makes kids smarter or do better in school? I doubt it...



have you never actually watched Sesame Street, or something?!?

I haven't watched an episode in years, but I learned tons from it when I was little-- here's some examples: one of these things is not like the other; counting with the Count, manners via Oscar the Grouch; how to be nice (Big Bird); elementary Spanish (or English, probably, for Spanish-speaking kids); learning about people from different cultures...

how anyone can think that kids don't actually learn from Sesame Street is just beyond me. (and I'm fairly certain there are studies that show exactly that... Newsweek article about Sesame Street. Here is just one story talking about its positive effects.)





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peapermint
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Posted: 10/5/2012 1:35:24 PM

And, I also do NOT appreciate your assumption that if it is worth raising your taxes for that I and everyone else agree or would be fine with that. I am NOT.


Well, I don't want so much of my taxes going toward defense and corporate welfare and certain other government spending to the degree that it is -- but no one's giving me a choice on that.

Dani-Mani
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Posted: 10/5/2012 1:48:37 PM
There are PhDs who devoted their entire lives to researching TV and kids. To ask if there's educational value in Sesame Street is like asking if snow is cold.

Please tell me your question isn't serious? I get those who don't want the government to find it. I don't agree, but I get it.

But to question if Sesame Street has any educational value is just plain absurd. Truly.




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Posted: 10/5/2012 1:56:32 PM

Why the focus on "killing Big Bird?" why not focus on no more Elmo!


Not Elmo! I love Elmo. Well, not 'Elmo's World'. He's also my favorite color.

I absolutely DO believe Sesame Street has educational value. And there's value in other PBS shows, too. I just think they need to get funding from other sources. I still remember one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten, eleven, twelve (if you could only hear the tune in my typing ) - the pinball segment. Abierto, cerrado! (open, close)

Unfortunately, there are many people who can't see past the nose on their face.



Dalai Mama
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Posted: 10/5/2012 2:10:31 PM

I wonder when plopping your kid in front of the TV to watch Sesame Street became educational.
November 10, 1969.


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Posted: 10/5/2012 2:18:36 PM

I wonder when plopping your kid in front of the TV to watch Sesame Street became educational.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

November 10, 1969.





TheBiscuitScraps
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Posted: 10/5/2012 3:57:45 PM

I wonder when plopping your kid in front of the TV to watch Sesame Street became educational. It seems kind of against the current trend of getting kids to move more and eat well (considering the shows are brought to you in part by McDonalds...). Is there any actual research that shows watching Sesame Street makes kids smarter or do better in school? I doubt it...


This is absurd. My 3 year old grandson and I watch it most days. We sing the songs, we count, we call out the letters, we talk about what the characters are doing, we talk about shapes, etc.

He has his own library in my home and in his own home and we reinforce what we have seen on Sesame Street when we read and play games. He loves The Count and Elmo and Mr. Noodle.

We have a bouncy/trampoline (the kind adults use to exercise). He often bounds through 1/2 of the show.

We use it in conjunction with other educational shows from time to time.

I'm for PBS and our government supporting it. But then, you all probably knew that.

What Romney did in the debate was very condescending to the host of the debate and to any children that were in the room watching. He could have chosen any number of projects paid for by government to have used as an example.

I do think the host could have done a better job, but to have one of the candidates say...I'm for taking YOUR job was out of line.



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rubberloon
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Posted: 10/5/2012 4:58:33 PM
I trust PBS and NPR to bring me some of the most unbiased news reporting available on television and radio. I can't believe anyone would think that FOX, MSNBC or CNN provide the same quality of unbiased "news." So without government funding, and the reliance on public support - i.e. big money by special interest groups - will public broadcasting remain free of bias?

Roxanne
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