Dog bit my DGS. Do you think. UPDATE with trainer's response.
Post ReplyPost New TopicPosted 1/7/2013 by caroscraps in NSBR Board
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caroscraps
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Posted: 1/7/2013 4:49:46 PM
Update:

This is what the trainer who started to work with the dog said to my DD. DGS was on the floor with friend looking at a toy, not being loud or moving around. For some reason dog felt threatened and when DGS looked at the dog at eye level with the dog, DGS's heart rate excellerated and dog sensed fear and bit.

I'm not sure I agree with the trainer but I will say I would not trust this dog again around children or possibly anyone visiting. My heart rate might excellerate seeing the dog and according to the trainer, *I* might get bit. I would hate to take that chance as the owner.
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My 5 year old DGS went to a friends house yesterday. The friends had just adopted a 10 month old shelter German Sheperd who lived in a pack until rescued.

The boys were playing on the floor and the dog must have felt threatened. She was not near the boys but walked over and DGS looked at dog. Dog bit and punctured the skin around his eye in three places.

The dog has not been trained. Do you think the dog will bite again?

It was an unprovoked bite. The friend's dad was right there and he said unprovoked.

DD will not let DGS around this dog again even though owners are going to hire a trainer.

What do you think? Once a biter always a biter? Just curious. We are dog lovers.


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StuckOnPeas

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Posted: 1/7/2013 4:53:21 PM
I have no idea if that dog will ever bite again, but *I* would never trust that dog again.

What did the dad do when the dog bit your dgs?

Is he planning on keeping the dog?


I am so sorry that your dgs was bitten. Is he okay? Will it scar?



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redboots
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Posted: 1/7/2013 4:53:30 PM
I wouldn't allow my child around that dog again. The dog's owners were highly irresponsible to allow an untrained animal (a rescue, no less) around a child. Period.

julieberg
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Posted: 1/7/2013 4:55:58 PM


There is no way I would let my child around a dog who bit and the owners should be afraid for their own child.

KittenOnTheKeys
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Posted: 1/7/2013 4:56:06 PM
I would never trust the OWNERS again. Why in the world was a child in the same room as an untrained, pack shepherd???



caroscraps
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Posted: 1/7/2013 5:06:23 PM
I would never let any child around that dog again and I would be afraid for my own child if I were the owners.

The owner washed DGS's face and brought him home to DD. he was, of course, very sorry about it. The families have been friends/neighbors for many years.

DGS is ok. No stitches. You know, it's one of those "it could have been so much worse.". And it makes me sick to think about it. Dd feels the same way, Swollen, bruised eye area for DGS. He seems ok about it and hasn't said a lot about it.


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tinaev
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Posted: 1/7/2013 5:08:45 PM
You know, in that circumstance I wouldn't ever trust the dog again. I also wouldn't ever have him around children.

I'm also really surprised that the adults felt like it was a good idea to have a rescued pack dog around a bunch of kids before it's been properly socialized and trained.

bobbie01
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Posted: 1/7/2013 5:09:07 PM
Tetanus shot?


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_Betsy_
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Posted: 1/7/2013 5:12:34 PM
Has he been seen by his pediatrician or the ER? They are required to report the bite. If he has not been seen, his parents can report the bite to local animal control officials (call the town clerk if you can't find the number on your municipality website).

The dog needs to be on record. The authorities can investigate and decide on the likelihood she'll bite again.

I was bit and almost blinded in one eye as a child. I still have scars. The family lied in court and said she had never bitten anyone. We then had a string of witnesses, including their mailman and their own relatives, who admitted to having been bitten by the dog. The dog was put down.

Had ANY of those people contacted the proper authorities, the animal probably would have been put down before I was mauled. Save other children the pain and suffering, and report the animal now.

_Betsy_
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Posted: 1/7/2013 5:14:04 PM
Tetanus? Not a threat here. Rabies, maybe, if there was skin broken? Is the dog up-to-date on vaccinations?

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Posted: 1/7/2013 5:14:23 PM

I would never trust the OWNERS again. Why in the world was a child in the same room as an untrained, pack shepherd???


No kidding!!

Personally, if I had a dog that bit a child, mine or a visitor, I wouldn't think twice about having the dog put down.

purplepackrat
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Posted: 1/7/2013 5:15:07 PM
What were they playing? If they were wrestling, giggling loud, yelling, etc., the dog may have thought it was protecting its owner - or even playing with the kids. It's 10 months old and until recently was nipping the others in its pack, right?



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Posted: 1/7/2013 5:16:15 PM
Just bump the ADD Housewife. thread and you'll get every opinion you could ever want from the Peas about a dog that bites...or is accused of biting...


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caroscraps
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Posted: 1/7/2013 5:19:31 PM
According to owner the boys were just on the floor looking at friend's Christmas gift when dog walked over and DGS just turned and looked at dog.


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PierKiss
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Posted: 1/7/2013 5:20:16 PM
On the one hand I think it's just a puppy. A puppy who is doing puppy things, and a puppy who was rescued from a pack of other dogs, and who hasn't been trained. So I get that this is a behavior that this dog hasn't been trained not to do it yet.

On the other hand, the dog bit a kid. I understand that the adult humans in the room made a very bad decision to let an untrained dog play amongst a group of small children, which the dog probably decided he was the alpha of, and why he bit your grandson when he looked at him. BUT. He did bite. I have zero tolerance for dogs that bite, so I would be reporting this to animal control. And if it were my kid I wouldn't be letting him near this dog again, nor would I let him back at that house again (assuming they keep the dog).




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Posted: 1/7/2013 5:22:13 PM
I do not think once a biter, always a biter (necessarily), but I would not let my child around that dog again.

The owners have already showed they have poor judgment about the dog - no way should a dog from that kind of situation been loose around kids without first going through a lot of training.

So, while I applaud that they are going to train it, I still would not trust their judgment.

I'm really surprised a shelter/rescue would adopt a dog with that background to a family with a small child.


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Posted: 1/7/2013 5:23:17 PM
It's quite possible for the dog to bite again. I would never trust it.

I would never choose to rescue a "pack" dog if I had children. Knowing that would have been a big red flag to me.

Depending on how old the dog is and how long he's been in a pack it could turn out that he would be very difficult to train to be a domestic dog.

Glad it wasn't too serious and that your DGS is OK.



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Posted: 1/7/2013 5:29:46 PM
For me if that had been my dog i would have it put down, you just never know and once they have the taste!!

I was brought up surrounded by dogs, my parents bred them and i have a great love for them. As a child i was used to dogs but it did not stop my uncles dog biting me, he bit the tip of my finger off, who knows why, he had had the dog years, and with my history with dogs i know i was great with them.

I do not let my DD go to anyone's house unless i know the dog well, in fact there are only 2 friends she is allowed to visit as i know the dogs have been brought up right I also have taught Lucy how to behave with dogs and not to annoy them as sometimes it can be the slightest thing. I may be over protective but i know the damage a dog can make to a child, to anyone.

You have to report that dog, it is your duty.Can you imagine how bad you would feel if it happened to another child and worse than what happened this time


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kimberly38
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Posted: 1/7/2013 6:20:03 PM
The dog is ten months old, so yes, I think it can be retrained. Especially a German Shephard. They are very easy to train, if someone takes the time to do so. If not, they can and will be left to their own devices, which is not good.

German Shephards for the most part, are very easy to train and very loyal animals. They also love people and do not like to be alone.

Mine practically crawls up my butt all the time.

Our previous dog, Zeke, a Samoyed, also did almost exactly what you described. WE were in our backyard and the neighbor boy came over. My dog was in another part of the yard. I still to this day, have no idea why, (the only thing I can come up with, is that he did not see said kid come into our yard. He was busy doing something else at the time). The kid came in and was playing with the kids I babysit. He had his back to our dog. Zeke went over and nipped him on the back. No broken skin, but a red mark.

I was scared! I had never seen this dog in any way act aggressive before. My dh thought we would have to put him down right away. I said, no, if he did it again, then yes, I think we should put him down. But, he has never done anything like this before. We will have to keep a closer eye on him, etc. He never did do anything like it again either.
I think he saw the back of this kid, wearing a black shirt and he was larger than the norm for his age, (think football player at ten), and Zeke had not seen him come into yard, only saw back of him.

WE offered to take kid to be seen or if they wanted to, we would paid for it. Mom was fine, kid was fine, said no.

Would I let my child around this dog again anytime soon? No. Would I report said bite? Yes. And dog should be up to date on all of it's shots, etc.

You said no stitches. Did dog break skin? Dog ran in pack. Dog could have thought it was playing with your ds, although, even when my shephard plays with me, it knows not to bite anywhere on the face. And we did not teach him this, he knows on his own. He looks like a wolf, (Blue German Shephard, looks black, but is not really black), but he is the biggest baby you will ever find.

At this time, because dog is young and easily trainable, (maybe, most shephards usually are, but there is always the exception), I would give the dog a second chance as it's owner, but I would not let it around children until it was trained, used to my own home, etc. and tested around a group again. If it showed any type of agression, as much as I love animals, I would have to put the dog down.

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Posted: 1/7/2013 6:47:42 PM
First,if this dog was just adopted it should not have been around the children during a playdate.

The dog owner is at fault here. I would not allow a situation like this to repeat.

It is hard to say whether the puppy should be put down. What do you mean by the dog lived in a pack? Is it a feral dog?

IleneTell
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Posted: 1/7/2013 6:49:47 PM
I agree with everyone who said they wouldn't trust the OWNERS again.



sues
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Posted: 1/7/2013 6:55:48 PM
For me- it wouldn't matter what the owner did now. My kid(s) would not be allowed over there again.

I'm a dog lover too. I don't know about 'once a biter, always a biter' and I hate the 'no bad dogs, only bad owners' argument. BUT- it seems incredibly stupid of these people to have allowed little kids to be around this dog in an unstructured atmosphere. A young shepherd that lived in a pack, is untrained, and new to the family ? That screams 'err on the side of caution' to me.

I agree with your daughter. I wouldn't allow my kids there again either.

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Posted: 1/7/2013 7:02:04 PM
I hope your DGD was taken to a doctor immediately. The infection from a dog or cat bite, especially on the face can be awful.

I would never allow my child bank in that house as long as the dog lives there



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Posted: 1/7/2013 7:02:38 PM

First,if this dog was just adopted it should not have been around the children during a playdate.

The dog owner is at fault here. I would not allow a situation like this to repeat.



This from me too.

We have an 11 month old German Shepherd puppy and even though she has a wonderful temperment we are still very watchful of her around others. She is still a youngster and she is still learning.


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Gail OH
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Posted: 1/7/2013 7:24:37 PM
The dog is still a puppy, not really faulting the pup but the owner...pup needs training...the owner needs trained more....


Gail

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Posted: 1/7/2013 7:35:54 PM
Oh, that's awful. I hope your gs isn't too traumatized or hurt.

There's no way in HELL I'd let my kid anywhere near that dog again or any dog with that family.



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Posted: 1/7/2013 7:44:57 PM

Personally, if I had a dog that bit a child, mine or a visitor, I wouldn't think twice about having the dog put down.


I agree. I don't trust my dog around little kids so he isn't allowed around little kids and we monitor him very closely around visitors. He is skittish despite working with him. If he were to bite someone he would be put down, although it would break my heart


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Posted: 1/7/2013 8:32:04 PM
There are almost no dogs that I would completely trust in a situation with three small children on the floor playing, being loud, and making rapid motions. So many things that young children do are frightening to dogs, regardless of their background. I've almost never heard of a situation where the child wasn't at least partially to "blame", usually unintentionally. Dogs and children just don't speak the same language. I would recommend two books by Jennifer Arnold about dog behavior which provide some examples of situations from the perspective of a dog. "Through a Dog's Eyes" and the other is something like "through the heart of a dog".

Here's an example to describe the point I'm trying to make. My late DH had a well-trained, extremely friendly, people loving golden retriever service dog. One time a little girl poked at the dog's nose a few times, putting her finger in the dog's nostril! Blitzy just sat there and took it. However, a few days later he growled and barked really aggressively at the dad of the little girl. If my dog had bitten the girl, who would have been at fault? Another time we were at the mall and a boy ran up really fast and gave my dog a fast, hard pet on his back then ran. Scared my dog to death. He almost nipped the boy, but luckily the boy ran away as fast as he came. On another occasion, a boy pulled Blitzen's tail. Sharp, sudden moves would scare Blitzen, and he was really good about not reacting too much, but there were plenty of times that he got that defensive or scared look that made me nervous. I'm sure any parent would have blamed my dog, but little kids should never be with a dog unattended. Kids should be carefully taught how to properly pet a dog with careful instruction by an adult. I would have never let a group of 3 kids around my really well trained dog, let alone a puppy that was new to a family. In this case, the dog shouldn't be blamed; it reacted exactly as I would have expected in that situation based on my own research into animal behavior. The kids should not have been allowed to play close to the dog. The parents/owners should have kept the kids and the dog separated. The dog owners are the only ones to blame in this situation.

_Betsy_
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Posted: 1/7/2013 9:16:38 PM
Raises hand. *I* was not to blame.

The older brother and his friend menacing, tormenting and abusing the dog, then setting it free on a group of 5-6 year olds at a birthday party - they were to blame. The parents who allowed that to happen were to blame for not fully and securely removing the dog from a birthday party with a bunch of youngsters in the house.

I didn't even know there was a dog in the house until it was lunging at me, mauling me. It picked me out of a crowd. I remember girls screaming and wondering what they were so upset about it - and then I woke up on an operating room table in the hospital.

I was not to blame. The family with an unsecured dog, unsupervised son and his friend, and a vicious dog with a history of attacking people was to blame.

simplekelly
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Posted: 1/7/2013 9:22:45 PM

I've almost never heard of a situation where the child wasn't at least partially to "blame"

I've got one. And the child did absolutely NOTHING to provoke the dog. Dogs are not always 'right'. People are not always to blame.
I have three. He just went back to the rescue 10 days ago. He was unable to be retrained and I could not take anymore time or risk. I'm not a novice dog owner. at all. dog only looked to me to respect. He's a one owner dog...like with a guy up in the woods who answers his door with a rifle. lol

sometimes dogs are in a rescue for a reason and not all rescue organizations are equal. the one I got my dog from is awesome. He was vetted and tested in many situations. No one could have forseen how he behaves in a 2 second period of time. I blame the previous owners who surrendered him due to "moving" and made him my problem. If you only knew how much money I lost and put toward that dog....the rescue now has him and their vet is running more tests. I'd be happily surprised if it was medical and curable...


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redboots
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Posted: 1/7/2013 9:24:20 PM

I was not to blame. The family with an unsecured dog, unsupervised son and his friend, and a vicious dog with a history of attacking people was to blame.


I'm curious as to why you felt the need to clarify that you were not to blame for what happened twice? I didn't see anyone saying the child was at fault.

Most of these cases are the result of negligent owners who do not properly socialize or monitor their dogs. I believe that most of the respondents on this thread made that clear.

ETA: I just saw the post that said children are partially to blame.

I completely, 100% disagree with this. It is the ADULTS in the situation who are to blame. The pet owners and possibly the parent of the child who is attacked. What a crazy thing to say.

_Betsy_
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Posted: 1/7/2013 9:27:01 PM
From the post directly above mine:

I've almost never heard of a situation where the child wasn't at least partially to "blame",

sues
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Posted: 1/7/2013 9:28:27 PM

I've almost never heard of a situation where the child wasn't at least partially to "blame"

I've got one. And the child did absolutely NOTHING to provoke the dog. Dogs are not always 'right'. People are not always to blame.

Kelly- I didn't want you to think you were crazy. LOL
I posted the above, you quoted me and posted....and in the meantime I deleted my post.

I usually avoid the dog threads. They can be upsetting. I get so tired of reading "No bad dogs, only bad owners." That's absurd. People are not always to blame, no matter how many abusive owners stories people can tell.

Of course, in the OP- the dog owners sound clueless. Honestly- what were they thinking?

redboots
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Posted: 1/7/2013 9:29:45 PM
Betsy, I just saw that and edited my post. I'm sorry!

It's crazy to blame the child in the situation. I believe the adults in the situation are completely to blame - even if the child is antagonizing the dog in question. It's the parents who've failed to teach their children how to treat animals.

simplekelly
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Posted: 1/7/2013 11:41:01 PM

Kelly- I didn't want you to think you were crazy. LOL
I posted the above, you quoted me and posted....and in the meantime I deleted my post.
haha! I was like.......huh......wah.....ooooohhhhh.....she's smart!


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Posted: 1/8/2013 3:11:52 AM

I would never trust the OWNERS again. Why in the world was a child in the same room as an untrained, pack shepherd???


This.

Also, I have SEEN a dog bite a child completely unprovoked. I've also seen a dog that the owner ASSURED us was safe, bite my daughter.

I wouldn't trust the owner. Period. I would report the bite to Animal Control, no ifs ands or buts. And would I trust the dog? Probably not. Certainly not with children. The "pack" history is troubling to me.


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Posted: 1/8/2013 6:58:35 AM
I would presume my dog - and any strange dog - is unsafe around visitors and the dog should never be out when visiting children are present. It's not worth the risk.

I can believe the child did nothing and would question if this dog was in the shelter in the first place due to biting?



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Posted: 1/8/2013 8:04:04 AM
I think in this situation the dog can be retrained. It's still a puppy who grew up with a pack. Pack German Shepherds, much like wolves, bite each other on faces often. It is likely that the dog was either trying to play, or establish control over the child who looked at him, like he would in his pack.

With that said, I would never let a child around this dog. This is not a kid friendly dog, and the owners are absolutely clueless. A pack dog should be adopted by a highly experienced owner, who can get him out of that mentality, or make himself the leader and the dog a loyal follower. These owners clearly don't have a clue how to train a dog like that. The dog should be rehomed, not put down.




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Posted: 1/8/2013 8:28:39 AM
I don't allow two of my 3 to be around children unsupervised. They aren't used to kids, our oldest grew up around children and just loves little girls. While I don't believe anything would ever happen, one is a dachshund/chihuahua mix (frequently not good with kids and or nervous-type dogs) and another is a blue heeler mix (herding instinct sometimes causes her to "nip" when playing). I'm not willing to take any chances when it comes to the safety of a child. Like others have said, that dog had no business being with the children unsupervised

I don't necessarily think "once a biter, always a biter", especially in this particular situation. Nevertheless, if that dog belonged to me, I would immediately look to rehome the dog to a home with NO children.



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Posted: 1/8/2013 8:35:05 AM

So many things that young children do are frightening to dogs, regardless of their background. I've almost never heard of a situation where the child wasn't at least partially to "blame", usually unintentionally. Dogs and children just don't speak the same language.


I understand the compassion for the dog and the inclination to look for the big-picture factors involved in a bite.

So I have been trying to formulate my thoughts carefully.

I suffered a serious dog bite when I was a child. I was sitting on the floor with the dog's entire human family, quietly watching a movie - Steel Magnolias, to be exact, not even an action movie with lots of noise and motion. The dog had been seated on one side of the room and then walked up to me and bit me on the face, head, shoulder, and arm. I was temporarily partially impaired in one eye and still have significant scars from the attack, though most of them are concealed by my hair and by clothing. That could have been a much more serious bite. I consider myself to have been lucky.

I don't believe that the bite that I sustained was the result of kids and dogs not speaking the same language. I do believe the bite I sustained was the result of some instinct in that dog. Whether its instinct really was to protect its master or the house, the fact is that the dog decided to defend against a person he knew, in a normal circumstance, where there was no quick motion or irregular activity. That is not an instinct I would trust in my home, or with my child. For that matter, that is not an instinct I would trust in the yard next door. You can't supervise away an incident like that - there is no time to intervene in the split second it takes for a bite to occur, and with larger dogs, most people lack the physical ability to intervene.

Therefore it is my belief that a dog that bites in such a circumstance should be humanely euthanized. And furthermore, that sometimes it's something that the dog did, not something that the humans precipitated.

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Posted: 1/8/2013 8:44:39 AM

The owner has a small child and has small children visiting and playing. And the dog is spending time unrestrained within sight of said children. It sounds like the dog should not have been placed in that home. The owners' hearts are in the right place but their heads are not.

And your dd is quite right to not allow her child to spend time with that dog again. Whether the dog can be trained not to bite is a moot point. The owners have already shown they don't understand what this dog needs to become a suitable pet in their home.

If the dog belonged to me, it would have to go back to the shelter, and be re-homed to a home with no children.


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blondiek237
PeaFixture

PeaNut 70,239
February 2003
Posts: 3,276
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Loc: Massachusetts

Posted: 1/8/2013 8:50:34 AM
First I would have never let the dog loose around anyone before it was properly trained and socialized.
Second I don't by once a biter always a biter. My Ozzy, when he was a pup, picked up something in the backyard--I didn't know what it was and didn't want him to have it, as I was trying to take it from him, he bit me--we spent everyday for the next few weeks working on drop it , leave it--now when I say drop it--he drops it. In fact it's now a game to him--he will tear apart a box he was given and bring the pieces over to you and leave them so he gets a treat.
Our Jax has a tendency to play a little rough and can get mouthy--he is NEVER left alone with strangers. We are working on "enough" with him, but he is a little stronger willed then Ozzy

Georgiapea
Mom to the Wild Things.

PeaNut 96,783
July 2003
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Loc: Altoona, Alabama

Posted: 1/8/2013 9:04:00 AM
That dog can not be trusted. Ever. If the people keep it that is their business but I would never allow my child in that home again.

Someone needs to take the child to the doctor and have the bite cleaned and the doctor will file a report of the bite, including name/address of the dog owners.

caroscraps
7 Sweetpeas for me

PeaNut 20,301
August 2001
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Posted: 1/8/2013 9:08:34 AM
Update:

This is what the trainer who started to work with the dog said to my DD. DGS was on the floor with friend looking at a toy, not being loud or moving around. For some reason dog felt threatened and when DGS looked at the dog at eye level with the dog, DGS's heart rate excellerated and dog sensed fear and bit.

I'm not sure I agree with the trainer but I will say I would not trust this dog again around children or possibly anyone visiting. My heart rate might excellerate seeing the dog and according to the trainer, *I* might get bit. I would hate to take that chance as the owner.


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littlelambchop
PeaNut

PeaNut 350,195
December 2007
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Posted: 1/8/2013 11:18:45 AM
I would not trust any dog alone with children - even my beloved golden who had her tail pulled by a toddler. I was there to intervene, thankfully. I also agree with the trainer. Staring a dog in the eyes is a threatening move. Most dogs will react with some form of aggression.

I think there is a teaching moment here for all concerned - the owners and the parents and child. Teach the child how to approach a dog - slowly, with a hand held out for the dog to smell, and not to stare in the eyes.


Lois

brab74
AncestralPea

PeaNut 455,916
February 2010
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Loc: Central Illinois

Posted: 1/8/2013 11:25:46 AM

This is what the trainer who started to work with the dog said to my DD. DGS was on the floor with friend looking at a toy, not being loud or moving around. For some reason dog felt threatened and when DGS looked at the dog at eye level with the dog, DGS's heart rate excellerated and dog sensed fear and bit.

I'm not sure I agree with the trainer but I will say I would not trust this dog again around children or possibly anyone visiting. My heart rate might excellerate seeing the dog and according to the trainer, *I* might get bit. I would hate to take that chance as the owner.

I'm a dog trainer ... here are my thoughts:

There is no reason an untrained dog with a pack mentality should have been allowed near children. That was a bad situation to start with. Now that it has happened, the dog should never, EVER be allowed near children again. Can the dog be trained? Possibly, but the owners need to take extra precautions. I would never trust it 100% and put it in a situation like that again.

Simply_Lovely
AncestralPea

PeaNut 463,295
April 2010
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Posted: 1/8/2013 11:28:30 AM

This is what the trainer who started to work with the dog said to my DD. DGS was on the floor with friend looking at a toy, not being loud or moving around. For some reason dog felt threatened and when DGS looked at the dog at eye level with the dog, DGS's heart rate excellerated and dog sensed fear and bit.


This is consistent with the pack mentality. He was establishing his leadership. A dog like that needs an owner who is an established leader and the dog knows that. This is not a dog to be kept around children. Even if the father will eventually establish himself as a leader, and perceived threat to the father will cause the dog to attack. So when a child runs up to dad to hug him it might set the dog off. This dog needs to be rehomed.




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StuckOnPeas

PeaNut 544,018
February 2012
Posts: 2,360
Layouts: 1

Posted: 1/8/2013 11:31:53 AM
Thank you for your update.

As far as the trainer explaining that the dog bit because your dgs looked the dog in the eye and his heart rate accelerated.... any dog that lives around humans need to have that instinct trained right out of it. And I say, once a dog has bitten a human, it is too late for that dog. I believe that it should be euthanized.

I am of the school that a dog must be trained to know that it is the absolute lowest member on the totem pole. I have friends and family who have trained their German Shepherds and Boxers to be so submissive that they can roll them on to their backs, exposing their bellies at any time. They can walk right up to them and take their food or treats. They can at any moment command their dogs to sit, stay, lie down, or stop and the dogs obey instantly.

I also believe that there must be a zero tolerance policy on biting. One bite is too much. One bite and the dog has to be euthanized.



Again, I am very sorry your dgs was bitten and I hope he recovers quickly.



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3kidmama
Ancient Ancestor of Pea

PeaNut 268,201
July 2006
Posts: 5,553
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Loc: Northwoods

Posted: 1/8/2013 12:04:03 PM
A few yrs ago, a Pea posted this link. It's the story of a family who's child got bit by a dog. The family has set up a foundation to educate people on how to "read dog's signals" because humans don't do a very good job of that!

Their link on "Let's talk dog" is must reading for any family with children who is every around a dog.

I have a golden retriever medical service dog. Some dogs DO just react! That is the reason why so many dogs that are bred to be service animals don't make the cut. It's not that they are bad dogs, but in many cases even a genetically hard-wired thing.

The truth is that the owners should NEVER have allowed that dog around young playing kids. The dog should have been removed to their "safe place" while kids were over to play.

The truth is that looking a dog directly into the eye IS (in dog language) an aggressive action. However, most kids or even adults do not know that - so they do what we do with people - look them straight in the eye! A properly trained dog should not bite with that kind of "provocation" - but it still might.

I don't even leave my Gracie unattended with young children in our home. They think she's such a cool dog, they want to drape themselves all over her - and she's not comfortable with strangers doing that. She generally goes to her "safe place" and I tell the kids she's to be left alone when she chooses to go there for a self-imposed time out.

Kelpea
Owner of "best tacky invitation" thread EVER

PeaNut 176,832
November 2004
Posts: 13,578
Layouts: 2
Loc: Stalking Dave Gahan

Posted: 1/8/2013 12:09:30 PM
I have learned so much from vet friends. One of the biggies is "never look a dog in the eye..." it's a direct challenge to the dog.

I believe it.


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