Masking--Mystery or Miracle? (updated)

Two Peas is Closing
Click here to visit our final product sale. Click here to visit our FAQ page regarding the closing of Two Peas.

Posted 1/26/2013 by looser in General Stamping
 

looser
The Craft Curmudgeon

PeaNut 256,594
April 2006
Posts: 14,669
Layouts: 365

Posted: 1/26/2013 1:24:37 PM
In my comments about my one heart tag I stated that it was simple--including the masking.

While I stand by that statement, I can appreciate that some StamPeas may not be as familiar with masking as others. So I figure we could discuss & share--'specially since my WF '13 challenge is 'Mostly Masking'...

For our purposes I suggest we keep to the basics, but 'sok if someone wants to add other masking ideas, etc.

What is masking? For stamping it involves covering a stamped image with something so you can stamp more images without having them cover the first image. This results in the illusion that the additional images are behind one-another. Lots of stampers use the technique to build scenes with several images. Let's call this 'regular' masking.

Most times the mask will be a cutout version of the image we're protecting, but not always. I've used just pieces of copy paper to great advantage. Other times I've ended up needing to make several duplicate & precise masks of an image. And 'Yes' it can be a real PITA to fussy cut all of them!

A variation of regular masking is called 'mortise-masking'. It has other names--frame, reverse, container are but 3 I've run across. Regardless of what you call it, the object is to stamp an image & then 'fill' that image with other stamped images. The first image is often a 'container' like a fish bowl, bottle, jar, etc. This time you stamp the ist image & then stamp it on your masking material. Then you cut the image out so your mask is the outline of the 1st image. Place that over the 1st image & stamp to 'fill'. Here's an example. See the apothecary jar? I made a mortise mask for it.

Now... Back when I first began learning to do masking, I only had mounted stamps. And masking is one major reason I prefer UMS. Makes it much easier to see precisely where I'm stamping. If you have/prefer mounted stamps it's likely you'll end up needing to employ positioners & such. Your choice, but practice will help--'specially if you're used to using them.

Ok. That should be enough to get the discussion underway...

lovepug2
EncycloPEAdia

PeaNut 356,430
January 2008
Posts: 3,249
Layouts: 158
Loc: TN

Posted: 1/26/2013 2:38:26 PM
Interesting! Of course I'm not a real experienced stamper(yet, I hope to get there!) I haven't done masking yet! Thanks for the lesson here, I'm looking forward to trying it out and doing your challenge during Winterfest. Do you use masking paper?I've seen a couple of YouTube videos where they use that or either a post it note.
Uploaded with iPhone client

Christinmay
PeaAddict

PeaNut 534,355
December 2011
Posts: 1,682
Layouts: 91
Loc: Sydney, Australia

Posted: 1/26/2013 3:21:31 PM
LeighAnn, I use a plain piece of paper with removable tape on it, so it's like a Post-it but I can put the stickiness where I want to.
Uploaded with iPhone client

howdyheidi
Oh For Peas Sake

PeaNut 540,243
January 2012
Posts: 6,751
Layouts: 304
Loc: PA

Posted: 1/26/2013 4:27:17 PM
I have such little experience with masking. I plan to buy some masking paper for the challenge. I think it will help it be a little less of a challenge for me.

All the masking you have talked about, Daniel, is something I haven't tried. Most of the masking I have done is to leave a white area with no stamping.

I am looking forward to learning!

djc
Olympian Pea

PeaNut 108,705
September 2003
Posts: 27,916
Layouts: 538

Posted: 1/26/2013 5:58:28 PM
LeighAnn, Post-Its work fine. The entire piece doesn't have to stick down as long as enough of it does. There's even a Post-it out now that sticks down almost completely; just the edge lifts up. For larger masks, I like to use Eclipse Tape that comes in rolls in various sizes. A mask can be just a paper that you tear across the top and move around on your page to make hills, frames, etc.

Christin, what brand of removeable tape do you use? I tried that with some removeable adhesive in a runner (forget the brand), and I had to go back and rub off some of the adhesive, and that messed up what I had already stamped.

Daria

lickeyan
PeaFixture

PeaNut 183,669
January 2005
Posts: 3,566
Layouts: 270
Loc: Utah

Posted: 1/26/2013 8:00:23 PM
I am a non-masker. Have tried this technique with less than steller results. I will try again for the challenge and will print off instructions so I can follow them. I have used the post it technique

Sounds like fun.

looser
The Craft Curmudgeon

PeaNut 256,594
April 2006
Posts: 14,669
Layouts: 365

Posted: 1/27/2013 9:26:37 AM
OK! Good tips & questions!

I've used both plain paper & purchased masking 'paper'. Therm-O-Web used to make Masking Magic. 'Sok, but plain (copier weight) paper is my go-to.

Couple more tips:

I like to use gluestick on the reverse of my masks. I've been using Elmer's stick. It's blue & dries clear. I apply a smear & allow it to go clear before using the mask. It has just enough tack to stay put without causing damage to the image underneath. Low-tack tape is fine, too.

If you are an 'organized' crafter (or not) you might find it useful to mark a good sized envelope & use it to hold your masks. That way you don't have to make new ones every time. I also smear just a touch of vaseline on my masks. Makes them last longer.

Then there's 'halos'. A halo is when you stamp the 2nd image over the 1st & get a bit of blank space around the 1st image. Doesn't bother some people, but others don't like halos. Two major reasons for halos:
1. the mask material is too thick. I avoid making masks from CS.
2. the mask is cut outside the image. For best results you want to cut just inside the image outline. Yes. It takes practice, but no more so than any other type of fussy cutting.

If your stamp doesn't have a clear outline--like some of my cloud stamps--it's better to err on the safe side & cut more; not less. Then do a quick test & see how it comes out.

One important thing about masking? You really do have to figure out the composition BEFORE you stamp. You must know which image(s) get stamped first. I cannot tell you how many times I've kicked myself when I discover that there was an image that I should have stamped before another. But don't dispair! If (when) that happens, you can often add the image as a layered piece.

One trick I've used to do a test of a masked piece is stamp it without masking. I assign a separate color to the foreground, midground & background images. That way I have a clearer idea of how many masks I need & how much masking I need to do for each 'ground'. The 'well preserved' piece absolutely required that & I still made a few goofs. Don't sweat 'goofs'! Most others won't notice--trust me!

SWLady
BucketHead

PeaNut 546,811
March 2012
Posts: 722
Layouts: 43
Loc: Evansville, WI

Posted: 1/27/2013 10:05:26 AM
I'm one who hasn't done this yet! But I'm marking it to read later. Prom dress shopping here we come, LOL

looser
The Craft Curmudgeon

PeaNut 256,594
April 2006
Posts: 14,669
Layouts: 365

Posted: 1/27/2013 10:18:42 AM
Happy shopping, Kathy! I bookmarked this thread, too.

Here's a simple example of just mortise making. Just 2 stamps--the bottle & the faery.

Christinmay
PeaAddict

PeaNut 534,355
December 2011
Posts: 1,682
Layouts: 91
Loc: Sydney, Australia

Posted: 1/27/2013 7:31:09 PM
Daria, my removable tape is a 'Renoir' dispenser - not sure if you have that brand. The worst I've had to do is easily peel off (fingernails help!) a bit of the tape, and the image was fine.

Daniel, I like the glue stick idea! I can see how that would just be tacky enough if dried.
Uploaded with iPhone client

lylacfey
PeaAddict

PeaNut 432,196
July 2009
Posts: 1,193
Layouts: 2
Loc: Ozarks

Posted: 1/28/2013 3:32:28 AM
I use the copy paper/glue stick method too for masking. One I think it's more frugal than buying post it notes. Two I can make different size masks. Post it note sizes tend to be limiting. I also store my masks in an envelope. I know that a lot of stampers will finish fussy cutting a mask and say to themselves I will only use this once and throw it away. I have found that when you start making masks you do go back to those shapes you made no matter how obscure they are. That is one of the craft supplies that is good to hold on too.

Masking is one of my favorite stamp techniques I use quite often. I have a card in my mind right now I want to make using masks.

looser
The Craft Curmudgeon

PeaNut 256,594
April 2006
Posts: 14,669
Layouts: 365

Posted: 1/28/2013 10:55:50 AM
Lickey left a comment on my 'bottled faerie' & asked how I did it. Figure it's best to answer her here...

This really is a simple 'mortise'. Just 2 stamps--bottle & faerie.

I stamped the bottle on the card & on plain paper. I cut the bottle image out to frame the image on the card. Then I stamped the faerie in-the-frame. That's all mortise masking is.

looser
The Craft Curmudgeon

PeaNut 256,594
April 2006
Posts: 14,669
Layouts: 365

Posted: 1/28/2013 2:16:52 PM
A recent post by Melissa reminded me that masks can be useful in other ways...

If you want to create the illusion of layering you can put a mask over a stamped image & rub a bit of color along one edge. When you remove the mask it looks like there's a cast shadow.

looser
The Craft Curmudgeon

PeaNut 256,594
April 2006
Posts: 14,669
Layouts: 365

Posted: 1/30/2013 9:42:24 AM
I just ran across a copy of STAMP IT! (summer 2001). It contains the article I wrote about masking--"Masking Unmasked".

It's been fun reading what I wrote over 10 years ago & looks like this thread has covered (no pun) most of what I put in the article.

I did find one thing I haven't included here... I recommended using plastic-coated freezer paper (PCFP) to make masks. They are very durable & I can remove any adhesive from the plastic by just rubbing it off.

BTW? The same issue has 2 of my projects--stamped surrounds for snowglobe & tealight jar. I even colored the work with crayons.

looser
The Craft Curmudgeon

PeaNut 256,594
April 2006
Posts: 14,669
Layouts: 365

Posted: 2/5/2013 1:52:26 PM
I'm in the process of working out the guidelines for my upcoming 'mostly masking' challenge for WF13, as well as a new sample which may or may not get uploaded before opening day.

It's likely that I'm going to ask entries to include both regular & morise masking, but don't get scared. I'm always liberal when I view any entry. Long as I can tell the player is trying, I'm pretty cool.

Regular masking should not present huge difficulties, but some of you may be a bit concerned about the mortise. 'Sok! I am your pal!

It's ok if you don't have an image stamp to use as a mortise mask--jar, bottle, etc. You will be able to use a template in place of a stamp.


looser
The Craft Curmudgeon

PeaNut 256,594
April 2006
Posts: 14,669
Layouts: 365

Posted: 2/9/2013 12:54:22 PM
You can make your own stamp mortise.

Version #1. Use a BG type stamp. Stamp it on paper & create an opening by cutting, punching, etc. Save both masking pieces. Place both parts on the project & remove the frame mask before stamping the BG on the project. You may eyeball your stamping or use a positioning aid. Remove the mask & put the frame mask in place before 'filling' the blank with more stamping.

Version #2. Cut, punch, diecut a shape. Place the shape on your project & use 1 or more stamps around the shape to create the frame. Remove the shape to expose the opening & fill in with more stamping--masking the frame as needed.


SageBrush45
PeaNut

PeaNut 229,888
November 2005
Posts: 301
Layouts: 27
Loc: Idaho

Posted: 2/9/2013 5:48:55 PM
Thanks for the tips! Know I know what I've done wrong in the past, I need to cut the mask inside the image lines.

looser
The Craft Curmudgeon

PeaNut 256,594
April 2006
Posts: 14,669
Layouts: 365

Posted: 2/10/2013 9:54:26 AM
LOL, Sagebrush. I hearya. But it's not wrong--just helps to avoid 'halos' when you don't want them. I don't mind halos sometimes--depends on the project.

lickeyan
PeaFixture

PeaNut 183,669
January 2005
Posts: 3,566
Layouts: 270
Loc: Utah

Posted: 2/12/2013 12:56:22 PM
Daniel, I love your challenges and always try them. However ever this time, I am going to have to skip your challenge - I jut finished iring challenge (mask, mask and stencil and I can't face doing another. I do not like the card I made and therefore I am giving myself permission not to do it again - even without the stencil.

So sorry, friend, another project, another challenge for me.

Ann

looser
The Craft Curmudgeon

PeaNut 256,594
April 2006
Posts: 14,669
Layouts: 365

Posted: 2/12/2013 1:28:45 PM
LOL, Ann. That's fine--no prob. 'Course... My challenge doesn't require a stencil; just the masking. Definitely simpler, but I'm not going to try to 'guilt' you or anyone into entering my challenge despite the amount of effort & energy it took for me to put together another of my unique & stamper-friendly challenges.

No, No! Believe me! I'm just fine with folks spending their valuable time doing more worthy challenges. All I ever want is for my beloved StamPeas to be happy. Don't worry about me! I'll be fine. 'Scuse me while I wipe my eyes & blow my nose. Not crying--just have a bit of a cold.

To Ann & anyone else. Seriously. No one has to apologize for not entering any challenge--including mine. This is a party--not a guilt trip fer crying out loud!

looser
The Craft Curmudgeon

PeaNut 256,594
April 2006
Posts: 14,669
Layouts: 365

Posted: 2/13/2013 1:33:17 PM
Although she says her 'brain hurts' (welcome to my clu, Heidi's entry for my WF13 is an excellent example of how uncomplicated masking--regular & mortise--can be when you do the planning & prepping.

First off, Here's Heidi's entry.

Looks complicated doesn't it? But it's not. She used 'regular' masking to make the blossom & frame image. The frame appears to be behind the flower. Then it was a simple matter to use the bird & branch stamp to 'fill' the frame.

Now... Can you see that since she has all those masks already made, she can do variations? And if she were to make masks of the bird & branch image, she'll be able to separate it into elements to further play.

Yes. Such play requires planning & prepping, but the results are so often worth the effort & it does become easier with practice. I promise!

looser
The Craft Curmudgeon

PeaNut 256,594
April 2006
Posts: 14,669
Layouts: 365

Posted: 2/15/2013 10:31:34 AM
Here's a way to turn an image stamp into a mortise when the 'opening' already has a design it.

This tip is inspired by Lickeyan's frame. Please look @ this before reading further...

Now. See Anns's 2nd image? Good! That's the already 'filled frame' she wants to use. (love the 'frame'; so-so on its 'filling')

To remove the 'filling':

1. Stamp the image on a piece of paper.
2. Cut out the interior shape & save the cutout. (Just like Ann did).
3. Place the interior shape directly on the stamp to mask it & ink the stamp.
4. Remove the interior mask & stamp on your project material. Voila! You have your blank mortise frame.
5. Now put the frame mask over the stamped image on your project material. You are ready to refill the opening with something different.

As long as both masks are saved, you can use them to make lots of filling variation AND... If you want just the filling (image), just reverse the masks when loading the stamp.

Get it?

looser
The Craft Curmudgeon

PeaNut 256,594
April 2006
Posts: 14,669
Layouts: 365

Posted: 2/16/2013 12:23:38 PM
Bumping this up in case it proves useful for anyone doing masking for any of the WF13 challenges--not just mine.

Lickey has a link to a masking tutorial. May also be useful, but (far as I can see) doesn't deal with mortise-masking.

Please remember. Techniques rarely have one name or one way of being done. Masking is very much one of 'those'.

My 'definition' of 'regular' masking usually means putting one image behind another, but is not the only definition.

One of the ways I like to approach 'masking' is to think of it as a way to 'protect' an image from encroachment by another image--even identical ones.

And you may grow weary of hearing this from me, but... I have yet to find a 'magic' way of learning any technique--including masking--without actually doing the work.

ScrapNatya
Is this an instrument of torture or communication?

PeaNut 1,583
October 1999
Posts: 9,669
Layouts: 476
Loc: Long Island

Posted: 2/16/2013 3:51:05 PM
To make my card, I first stamped the mason jar. Then I cut out the interior in order to have a "frame" of the jar.

I took a new piece of white cardstock and layered my "frame" over it. I sponged some CTMH Smoothie ink inside to color the inside of my jar.

I then selected my face stamp. I stamped it on a post it note. I then cut away the part of the post-it that had her facial features on it.

Next, I went back to my frame laying on top of the sponged ink. I laid the post it mask on top of this so that when I stamped my face it would show up on the sponged part. I stamped the face.

I then lifted the whole frame up and then took the mason jar stamp and fit it to the outline that the sponging left. I stamped the jar and then cut around it so I could layer it on my card.

I colored on the top of the jar with a gold leaf pen which is clearly past its prime.



ETA: I tried this technique a few times yesterday with a clock stamp...time in a bottle etc....but did not like the looks of it because masking the clock was a little too intricate. I kept thinking about a face so started with that today and I was much happier!

looser
The Craft Curmudgeon

PeaNut 256,594
April 2006
Posts: 14,669
Layouts: 365

Posted: 8/28/2013 12:13:51 PM
Making a mask when all you have is a prestamped image...

I'm currently part of a Halloween image swap. I've received many wonderful images (black ink on white stock). A few of the images would allow me to add more stamping via masking, but I don't have the stamp & only have one of the images. So. How do I make a mask?

Well. I could make a copy of the image via copy machine/printer. but I try to avoid doing that unless I need to resize an image.

Easiest way I've found is to lay a piece of (thin) white paper on the image & pencil trace it's outline. I try to trace lightly so I don't mess up the original by pressing to hard.

lickeyan
PeaFixture

PeaNut 183,669
January 2005
Posts: 3,566
Layouts: 270
Loc: Utah

Posted: 8/30/2013 7:58:18 AM
Daniel --------Masking is still a big "mystery" to me.

This is one area of stamping that I really need to take a class in. Maybe I can find one on line. I have tried it twice for challenges and truly was very hard for me. Just realized that this is an older thread and it does have the instructions for masking on it.

I am going to go backup and print them off and try again and again. Might even try some masking tape.



mplsbetty
PeaWee

PeaNut 476,557
July 2010
Posts: 99
Layouts: 20
Loc: Minneapolis, MN

Posted: 8/30/2013 12:03:08 PM
Jennifer McGuire recently did a video for studio calico showing how she used washi tape for masking. I thought it was very clever. I apologize I am posting from my phone, so cannot link. I'm subscribed to studio calico's YouTube channel and it came up in my feed. Tips & tricks with Jennifer McGuire washi tape masking.
Uploaded with iPhone client

looser
The Craft Curmudgeon

PeaNut 256,594
April 2006
Posts: 14,669
Layouts: 365

Posted: 8/30/2013 12:32:49 PM
LOL, Lickey! You tickle me when you post! Yep. Best way 'I' learn is to keep trying everything over & over. It's a rare person who does any technique perfectly the first time--except for me, of course!

Trust me! My first trys were all learning experiences because I was used to painting--where the background was often put in before the foreground.

gardencat
Jeepers PEApers

PeaNut 495,307
January 2011
Posts: 2,345
Layouts: 172

Posted: 8/30/2013 12:50:42 PM
The few times I've tried masking I've found it kind of a PITA. I think it is something that would become easier, if one did it more, as your mind would start to think in 'masking mode' and be quicker to realize what layers need to go in first etc.

The few times I've tried, I've had to think and think again, when trying to figure out what image to stamp first or second and even then have made a few goofs. And I'm one of those who hate halos or, if you cut too far inside, overlaps, so I've also ended up recutting masks a few times because I didn't like the results they were giving me.

I very much like the results some people get when they use masking to create scenes but it certainly isn't a technique that comes easily or naturally to me.

SWLady
BucketHead

PeaNut 546,811
March 2012
Posts: 722
Layouts: 43
Loc: Evansville, WI

Posted: 8/31/2013 11:08:28 AM
Here's a link to a new video that shows some masking.

Masking

At about the 2 minute mark she shows masking. I love these images.

looser
The Craft Curmudgeon

PeaNut 256,594
April 2006
Posts: 14,669
Layouts: 365

Posted: 12/7/2013 4:54:32 PM
While working on a piece for the 'Snow Globe' Challenge, I needed to cut multiple masks (still have more to do).

For the first time in a while I needed multipe mortise masks. That reminded me that when it comes to doing mortises within mortises, the order of stamping is a bit different from doing other masking.

Rather than stamping foreground to background, I had to go from outer to inner & make both mortise & regular masks for each image.

Example... Lets say I want to stamp a dog, cat & bird. I also want the bird to be inside the cat. And want the cat to be inside the dog. Gross, huh?! Anyhoo... I stamp the dog first & mortise mask. Then I stamp the cat & mortise mask it. Finally I stamp the bird. When I remove the masks I have all the images inside one another. (& the SPCA on my butt)

looser
The Craft Curmudgeon

PeaNut 256,594
April 2006
Posts: 14,669
Layouts: 365

Posted: 1/27/2014 12:46:26 PM
With 2 WF14 challenges being masking-related (check the master thread) & lots of current chatter about stencils, I thot we might find this thread useful.

Eagertoretire (Marshia) is going to offer a WF challenge that might involve 'regular' stamp-masking. But you never know.

Caribbeangirl & Lovepug are both doing challenges involving stenciling.

Here's your chance to ask questions, share tips & yadda yadda about the broad topic of 'masking'.

Although stamp-masking tends to be about creating the illusion of depth without layering, stenciling is (often) about creating pattern. But there are lots of ways to go beyond that. And use both stamped images & stencils in concert.

Looking forward to comments, tips, questions from y'all.

gardencat
Jeepers PEApers

PeaNut 495,307
January 2011
Posts: 2,345
Layouts: 172

Posted: 1/27/2014 4:18:04 PM

Example... Lets say I want to stamp a dog, cat & bird. I also want the bird to be inside the cat. And want the cat to be inside the dog.


I know an old lady who swallowed a fly...I don't know why, she swallowed a fly...perhaps she'll die ? LOL

Guess you posted that while I was away and I never saw it till now but, thanks for my afternoon laugh.

iring
AncestralPea

PeaNut 153,026
June 2004
Posts: 6,296
Layouts: 381
Loc: South Florida

Posted: 1/29/2014 8:55:13 AM

I know an old lady who swallowed a fly...I don't know why, she swallowed a fly...perhaps she'll die ? LOL

Lol!

Thanks Daniel (SPCA), and Gardencat! You both made me smile today!

I would love to see the bird, cat, dog! Hahaha, just reminded me of a turducken! For some reason, even though they are stacked instead of nested, it also made me think of the Bremen town musicians. I have always loved that image! I bet you could use masking to perfectly place each animal on the stack. I'm going to look for the musicians to link up here.

ETA: Just in case you haven't heard of the Bremen town musicians. Here is a Wikipedia description with a photo of a bronze statue in Bremen

iring
AncestralPea

PeaNut 153,026
June 2004
Posts: 6,296
Layouts: 381
Loc: South Florida

Posted: 2/1/2014 12:04:03 PM
On the subject of masking ...

I posted a card today that uses two masks, for the purposes of distress inking just a portion of the image. I show the image and masks in the gallery post.

Happy Birthday Hubby! Pop-up

looser
The Craft Curmudgeon

PeaNut 256,594
April 2006
Posts: 14,669
Layouts: 365

Posted: 2/7/2014 4:08:41 PM
Cindi (Iring) has a great WF14 challenge that gets into masking the actual stamp. Her challenge blog has tips on how to do this form of masking.

Along with the tape method, however, you can use the paper masks to pull this type of masking off. And... it has the benefit of being able to re-use the mask over again, plus more...

You make your mask in the regular way--stamping & cutting out the image. So far so good? Now... you reverse the mask & put it (or part of) on the stamp. Then ink your stamp. Remove the the mask & stamp.

Whether you mask your stamp with an 'image' mask or tape, it is (as Cindi shares) vital to remove the mask before stamping. And...I recommend cleaning the stamp between any stampings.

I don't clean my stamps often, but for this technique I find it best to start with a clean stamp. If the masked part has any ink on it, you may get a faint image of that portion.

iring
AncestralPea

PeaNut 153,026
June 2004
Posts: 6,296
Layouts: 381
Loc: South Florida

Posted: 2/7/2014 4:47:07 PM
Thanks Daniel for mentioning my WF14 challenge, Mask Your Stamp.

I never heard/thought of masking the stamp with paper. Would you stick the mask to the stamp? Using what? Glue stick?

I guess because I'm not much for fussy cutting, I go quick and dirty with tape!

On the example in my blog where I masked away the scallop circle around a sentiment, I think I did actually try creating a more conventional paper mask by punching a circle out that would let the sentiment peek through. After fumbling through circle punches for the perfect size ... yep, I reached for some washi tape sitting right in front of me!

looser
The Craft Curmudgeon

PeaNut 256,594
April 2006
Posts: 14,669
Layouts: 365

Posted: 6/12/2014 1:50:57 PM
With WSW14 just a few days away, I thot I'd post a bit more about 'masking' on the chance that some of our party challenges might allow us to play with this particular stamping technique.

When I began employing masking some decades back, I was all about making sure that every mask was perfectly cut & positined. As I continued to grow as a stamp 'artist', I found that masking needn't be 'perfect'. Long as the results satisfy me, I'm content.

My most recent masked project is a good example of my willingness to let the piece work for me.

Do I still believe that those who are new to masking learn the basics? Sure. But I also believe that striving to be perfect with any technique--including masking--is a waste of creative energy.

Can't wait to see any of the WSW14 challenges & entries that include the possibility of stamp-masking in its myriad forms. Us StamPeas rock!

howdyheidi
Oh For Peas Sake

PeaNut 540,243
January 2012
Posts: 6,751
Layouts: 304
Loc: PA

Posted: 6/12/2014 1:56:09 PM

But I also believe that striving to be perfect with any technique--including masking--is a waste of creative energy.


Good point!

If it helps anyone, I have become faster at using that masking technique than I was a year ago.

One mistake I made recently was using copy paper for my mask, and then using distress ink to stamp. The distress ink went right through the paper! Not a big deal, I just started over and learnt my lesson!

looser
The Craft Curmudgeon

PeaNut 256,594
April 2006
Posts: 14,669
Layouts: 365

Posted: 6/13/2014 10:43:48 AM
I prefer making masks from copy paper too, Heidi. The thinner paper helps reduce getting halos.


A simple way to prevent bleed-thru is to stamp the image on copy paper. Wipe the image with a bit of vaseline. Wipe off any excess with a napkin. Then cut out the mask.

The vaseline prevents any bleed-thru. HTH
Show/Hide Icons . Show/Hide Signatures
Hide
{{ title }}
{{ icon }}
{{ body }}
{{ footer }}