Paci's and strong willed children

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Posted 1/28/2013 by justalittletike in NSBR Board
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justalittletike
AncestralPea

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August 2009
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Posted: 1/29/2013 9:28:19 AM

Unless a baby is quite premature and needs
a paci to help with their sucking reflex
they do not need a paci.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



all babies have a sucking reflex need for a while..

I will agree that I almost took away the paci at 6 or 7 months and Dh kept giving it back to him out of habit every time B would slighly cry and I never said anything to him because it made it easier for him (DH) so I let him. B didn't really even care then. My DH doesn't handle stress or crying even very short term very well so I never said a word. If I would have done it then it would have taken me one day and one night and this would have never even been an issue. It was just after that mark when B started realizing things were missing and would look for things that the paci became an issue. I'm pretty sure I made this problem for myself. But, then B started having the other issues so I am glad he had it to cling onto.



justalittletike
AncestralPea

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August 2009
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Posted: 1/29/2013 9:31:25 AM
Margaret- I am going to at least until his 3rd birthday and I will talk to his pedi about it and dentist since it is only at bedtime.



lovestorun

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June 2003
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Posted: 1/29/2013 10:25:32 AM

So many adults have something they 'need', so why can't we let our little ones have something?


You must need an orthodontist bill, too?

CountryHam
PeaFixture

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Posted: 1/29/2013 10:26:15 AM

No full term baby has a sucking need?


Full term healthy newborns have a developed sucking reflex.
You can't deny that most babies and toddlers with pacis stuck in their
mouths are for the sanity of the parents and not the comfort of the child.

IleneTell
StuckOnPeas

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August 2009
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Posted: 1/29/2013 10:33:18 AM

You can't deny that most babies and toddlers with pacis stuck in their
mouths are for the sanity of the parents and not the comfort of the child.


Obviously, it's for the comfort of the child. The child is comforted by the sucking and calms down...which then, as a result, helps the sanity of the parent.

FOr the record, neither of my kids ever wanted to have anything to do with pacifiers...sure would have been nice in the beginning if they had, though! LOL



Mary Mary
NOT IN UTAH

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April 2004
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Posted: 1/29/2013 10:41:01 AM
I don't have any advice... I took away my baby's paci a couple weeks ago and I think she still hates me for it. She doesn't ask for them, but she hasn't slept very well since.


Mary

MergeLeft
Typical Liberal

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Posted: 1/29/2013 11:20:58 AM
As mentioned above, my kids both used their paci for a long time and while they both need orthodontia, the orthodontist confirmed that in neither case was it because of the pacifier. They both just have a lot of crowding due to small palates. Neither has any dental issues at all. I think the newer shaped pacifiers don't cause those issues as much as the old ones did.

And FWIW, having seen some of the "self-soothing" habits kids develop in lieu of using a paci and then bring with them to pre-K or kinder, I'll take the paci any day. Hair and shirt chewers, kids who play with themselves ... yep, the paci was a better choice.


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