When did scrapbooking turn into

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Posted 4/3/2013 by HoneyBee13 in General Scrappin'
 

HoneyBee13
StuckOnPeas

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Posted: 4/3/2013 10:07:02 PM
Just telling stories? It seems like scrapbooking is a lot different now then when I first started. When I first started it was all about the pictures and telling the story of what happened in those pictures.
When did it change to telling stories? Are scrappers afraid of forgetting and trying to get everything they can remember now into their albums?

Sorry trying to figure out what scrapping is for me, because I listened to an OLD PRT and I am curious.

biochemipea
likes shiny things

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Posted: 4/3/2013 10:10:15 PM
I don't think scrapbooking has turned into just any one thing.

Everyone has their own reason to scrapbook. I'm a story teller, and I want to use photos of the people, places, and moments I love to tell those stories. I think my pages are photo-centric while also telling a story.

And, I won't lie -- I love paper! and stuff! and gold! and all the other things that shine! So, that's why I don't write stories on lined paper and stick them into a magnetic photo album.

I want to tell pretty stories.

That's what scrapbooking is for me -- or has been, or has turned into.


jillienedesigns
PeaAddict

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Posted: 4/3/2013 10:11:20 PM
I think that scrapbooking has melded into the journalling realm. I should say it has grown. Its a form of artistic expression instead of a record keeping medium. I love it this way- its a part of me instead of just a hobby. I see the world with "scrapbooking story eyes" and it makes my experience feel more meaningful. I contemplate the/my story and it keeps me in the moment.

TracieClaiborne
Perfectionist Pea

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Posted: 4/3/2013 11:02:38 PM
I gotta break down this OP:


When did scrapbooking turn into just telling stories?

What makes you think it did? Personally, I don't think ENOUGH people are telling their truly important stories, including myself.


When I first started it was all about the pictures and telling the story of what happened in those pictures.
I really believe for most scrappers, it still is. I see many trends happening lately, including lots of product on a page or smaller photos with minimal journaling but too many stories? I'm not seeing that anywhere. I'm not trying to be argumentative - I'd love to see that and know it exists!


Are scrappers afraid of forgetting and trying to get everything they can remember now into their albums?
Yes, absolutely! I certainly am because I have already forgotten so much and my child is only 12 and I am only 42. I barely remember what happened yesterday, let alone 10 years ago. Also, if we don't put our most important stories into our scrapbooks, aren't we just making a decorated photo album? Which....is fine by the way, if that's what you want to do but isn't storytelling what scrapbooking is about, at the core? Maybe not for some, but it is for me.


Sorry trying to figure out what scrapping is for me, because I listened to an OLD PRT and I am curious.
What PRT episode? I would love to know! I am a HUGE PRT fan!

aerynkelly13
PeaFixture

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Posted: 4/4/2013 12:57:31 AM
The entire reason I started scrapbooking is the stories. We'd hand DH's photo albums to people and I'd have to hover over them telling them where we were, what happened, why we were at that location... it was tiring! When I heard about scrapbooking I said "that's what I need to do!". This way I can hand someone an album (or Iris box in my case) and leave them alone. The pictures are there, the story is there, a little bit of embellishment is there, all the info they might wonder about.

I WILL say that I felt a LOT freer once I realized that I didn't have to scrap EVERY photo my husband takes. He's a landscape photographer and has his favourite spots. There's only so many times I can showcase 50 photos taken in Bishop, CA without getting super bored and running out of unique stories. Now I pick his best and tell about our day that trip. That will usually make it different than the previous trip.

Paperclips29
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Posted: 4/4/2013 2:20:24 AM
I don't think it has. I just think those folks who are telling stories are being more vocal about their scrapbooking. I see tons of layouts in the gallery with little or no journalling. Those folks are scrapping for different reasons, and if that is what makes them happy, then great.

It's not what makes me happy. I used to scrap my photos, and in the end (and many pages later) I didn't feel those pages were worth anything. To me, those pages simply became a waste of supplies and time and space. I became a story-first scrapper because without the story the photo had less meaning (at least for me). I look at photos of our ancestors and wonder what the photo was about, about who they were, etc., so I try and document those kinds of answers in my scrapbooks. Funnily enough, when I post layouts in the gallery, I most often get comments about how photo-centric my layouts are. Conversely, when my husband comments on a layout, his comments are always about the story. He isn't interested in the pretty pages.

Like Biochemipea stated, I want pretty stories because it is a medium that is easy to share with others and I enjoy looking at them. Otherwise I'd just keep a journal.

Fevvers
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Posted: 4/4/2013 2:45:23 AM
I don't think of "telling stories" purely in terms of journaling. The entire layout -- each one of its components -- tells a story. Some layouts speak volumes with very few words, for instance.

shimelle
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Posted: 4/4/2013 3:20:43 AM

Just telling stories? It seems like scrapbooking is a lot different now then when I first started. When I first started it was all about the pictures and telling the story of what happened in those pictures.
When did it change to telling stories? Are scrappers afraid of forgetting and trying to get everything they can remember now into their albums?


Because I started scrapping in what seems like the 1800s (okay, 1998), I've been through some big changes in my own scrapping evolution alongside the changes that have happened in the industry and the scrapping community. I don't think what we see these days is _just_ telling stories. If it were, there would be less prevalence of design discussion, less variety of decorative supplies to purchase, possibly even fewer instances of scrappers working to improve their photography. So I think there is plenty going into the pages of today - choices made in photos, supplies, and design styles as much as the storytelling element.

However, I can tell you that the pages that mean the most to me personally are the pages that tell stories.

When I first started scrapbooking, I included a lot of writing, albeit in smaller chunks like captions rather than extended stories. I was creating away blissfully, completely unaware that there were magazines and websites dedicated to scrapbooking. When I discovered those sources of information and inspiration, my pages changed. I honestly hadn't been thinking about design or balance and I was completely unaware of all the supplies that were available (even then). I quickly evolved from a more collage-ish, journal style to something more streamlined. Making room for larger photos and these newfound products for embellishing left me with less room to write - but that seemed 'okay' because the pages in the magazines also had less writing than what I had been using. It wasn't a conscious decision at the time, but in changing my style, I dropped way back on the journaling and just included the most general of information like names, dates, and places. For some reason if I did include more writing, I seemed to say things that were really obvious in the pictures already. I have a layout of my sister and I ice skating and the journaling actually says 'My sister and I went ice skating'. As if you couldn't tell? Oh goodness.

I stayed in that little bubble for a long time with my scrapbooks, but I hadn't really stopped writing: I was just keeping my writing in a separate place. So I had scrapbooks with my photos and a few obvious details and plenty of embellishment and pretty paper, and then my journals with just lined pages filled with story after story of my ramblings. When I look back at that it seems so obvious that the two should have come together, but they didn't for quite some time.

Eventually I went through an evolution of finding my own style in what made scrapping feel worthwhile to me. I don't think that is a single definition that applies to every single scrapper in the same way, and I can only speak for myself. But I can tell you that I can line up all those pages I have ever made and 'my sister and I went ice skating' does not not make a page that speaks to me. In fact, this recent Glitter Girl episode is, in a way, about me improving upon those pages in a way that works for me. If you went through my oldest layouts, there are some total oddball photos and events in there that would make you wonder what the heck was the story. Let's add this up: from my early pages, you'll see that I grew up in Kansas. You'll also find pictures of the county fair, a lot of dance recitals, training at Johnson Space Center, cheerleading, and dog shows. HOW ON EARTH does all that go together? And why do some of those random things just disappear? And how and why do I then end up in England, after all those years in Kansas include no travel out of the country at all?

That's why the storytelling became important to me, and it's not about individual pages - for me, scrapbooking is about the flow of the story through all of my albums, and I know that is something that is harder to see in the format of one-page-at-a-time that galleries and blog posts make easy.

Now if you look through my 'early years' albums, those stories have been expanded and you can read exactly how all those things came to be important in my life, why some of them ended abruptly, some were picked up again later, some were left behind entirely. It tells the story of how I came to move to England and why I stayed and how very different the first town where I lived in England was to my Kansas hometown and later how living in London is so very different to living in a completely rural location.

My journals are now a different step in the process. I still write in them, but not as much because I want those stories in my albums illustrated with and connected to the photos. But sometimes I happen upon a story and the time is not quite right to scrapbook it, and then I put those notes in my journal (sometimes the whole story, often just notes so I don't forget) to keep the story until such a time comes when I am ready to put that in my scrapbook. The two work together instead of separately. In fact, from writing this, I'm going to my journal to record a reminder that there is a hilarious, if somewhat icky, story about my first experience with cockroaches being the first night I arrived at the JSC, and this is clearly clearly CLEARLY meant to be a layout with the title 'Houston, we have a problem'. That is pretty much how my mind works for pages, and no, I don't know what photos I would include on that page at all and I'm 100% sure it won't be any actual bugs!!! But it's a story that has become quite important as around the same time I was there, my husband was living in Houston (of course we were decades from meeting!) and he has his own story of the giant bugs there. And when we have travelled to places with bugs that give me the total creeps, our survival strategy has been to say 'this is nothing compared to the roaches in Houston!' That is kind of story that makes scrapping meaningful to me, bugs and all. (Apologies to both people from Houston - I promise I do not judge you by your insect population! - and to everyone who just got generally icked out by bug talk. It ends here now, I promise.)

I'll be honest: the stories made such a difference to scrapbooking for me that I have to really work hard to understand scrapbookers who don't tell stories. I can objectively list the reasons: that the photos are a priority, that they will be preserved safely, that the craft and the process is more enjoyable to some than the finished product or the value of the album in the long term. And so on. I understand there are different types of motivation, and I've been there a bit before, but I have to really stop and remind myself of that because it is not what I feel. There are some gut instincts that kick in and make me sad when scrapbookers say they just make the pages and put them in a box or they never look at their albums. I look at my albums all the time and they are so immensely valuable to me. I can't imagine putting all my pages in a box and never looking at them again - except those pages that didn't have any real story to them. Those essentially do live in a box (and many of them are gone entirely, as I went through a phase of editing and there were pages I decided weren't how I wanted to tell those stories, so I took the photos and started again). But my last nine or ten years of pages? They are all in albums and tell the stories I want them to tell and anyone who comes to my home is welcome to take them off the shelf and read if they want. They might not want! That's okay. I won't force anyone. But I look at the corresponding album before I make each page, so I am constantly looking at my albums. Never looking at them is something far removed from my own personal experience. I have the same sort of gut reaction when people in workshops tell me they don't write on their pages because it feels like school, like a test that is going to get marked in red pen. I enjoy the process of writing, so I have to get myself into that mental headspace to remember not everyone does. Does that make sense?

I've written an entire treatise here it seems, but interestingly, I think there is more evidence of scrapbooks being story-based before it turned into an industry. There are a few books out there on the oldest scrapbooks and they turn up in museum exhibits here. Of course, photos weren't always easy to come by, so many times there would be descriptions of things along with whatever memento came from the day - be that a feather or a ticket stub or swatch of fabric. And as a society, people have always been storytellers even before we started archiving things with writing. But even way back then, there were people in communities and tribes who were more involved with that storytelling than others who focused on other needs of the group. Stories have always had ways to teach us, to persuade us, to entertain us. Today we're blessed with so many formats for storytelling, from pen and paper to telephones to facetime and youtube and so many things, including scrapbooks. We don't all have to use all of the methods in order to tell our stories, so what I need to remember is that for every person like me who prefers to tell those stories by writing on a scrapbook page, there is someone else out there who likes to phone her sister and chat, and someone else who is talking to a webcam and posting it to her friends on the internet.

All hail variety.

To answer the question in the most specific form, for me the change was about ten years ago. I think others' experience will vary.

(and sincerest apologies to ANYONE who just tried to read all that on the app. it's ridiculous enough on the normal computer screen. sorry.)

HoneyBee13
StuckOnPeas

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Posted: 4/4/2013 8:31:36 AM
I was listening to an old PRT in 2010 with Becky Higgins last night and the night before that I was listening to a recent one.
I am truly sorry if I have offended anyone that was not my intention. I started scrapping on my own with no classes or LSS. The only scrap albums that I have seen are mine and my SIL.
After a lot of years I am still trying to figure it all out. I got the organization. I have all of my printed photos in albums.
I struggle with how I want my albums to look. If I want my l/o to go in with with my photos or in a seperate album.
I had never thought to include stories without pictures into my albums and I have taken the cover to cover class and undersood everything.
Shimelle- I love your explanation! It really is food for thought.
Now I need to figure out how I want my albums to look.

Paperclips29
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Posted: 4/4/2013 8:54:12 AM
I don't think you offended anyone.

And I totally understand... I've never seen another scrapbooker's pages IRL. All I've ever seen has been on the internet. If you are ever in Denmark, you welcome to browse my scrapbook albums. Most of the pages are even in English.

I found that when I was starting to change the way I viewed my scrapping (around 2006 or so) the best thing I did was look back through all my pages and see what spoke to me and why. I also looked at what I didn't like. It really helped me define my style and priorities. I also found it very inspiring.

ScrapNatya
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Posted: 4/4/2013 9:00:23 AM
Of course, Shimelle's answer covers it all!

My credo is that scrapbooking is whatever I want it to be.

Some days, I want to write about my mother and search out a photo so I can pair what I want to say with some pictures.

Some days, I want to play with my new products and just layer a bunch of stuff on my page and write, "My sister and I went ice skating."

Some days, I am thinking about how much I love my keurig maker. I take a picture of it and make a page with the title "I love coffee."

Now, these 3 layouts might end up next to each other in an album. Or they might not. I have 40 albums someone can look through if they want. It's just as much fun to see old pictures next to recent ones as it is to see a baby's first year book.

I don't worry about if my album is cohesive or not. But that's just me. Everyone has their own feelings on the matter.

NancyDamiano
Garden Girl

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Posted: 4/4/2013 9:09:18 AM
I think scrapbooking has morphed from it's original 'describe the photos' and into art journals, photo diaries and project life. And there are many traditional scrapbookers still out there as well.

To quote Shimelle,

All hail variety.


Find your scrapbook groove and stick to it. Play a little, experiement with the trends and pass on the ones that don't speak to you. It's all good.

ScrappyJac
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Posted: 4/4/2013 9:28:31 AM
Shimelle -

treyaut
StuckOnPeas

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Posted: 4/4/2013 9:45:17 AM
Scrapbooking for me is everything rolled into one - story telling, documentation, photo preserving, etc. My style is whatever I feel like doing at that time. There are times I just want to reflect on the beauty that radiates through my daughter's beautiful almond shaped brown eyes (and I've made several LOs regarding just that). There are times, I want to right a letter to my kids and remind them how blessed and special they are and to embrace who they are. I write a letter every birthday to my kids and include a special photo for that year. There are times when I want to include a special prayer on a layout because we are going through a difficult time. And sometimes I don't want any journaling, because I want the the picture to captivate my audience (and maybe a title). I want it all to be documented, starting with "the view from my camera", then through my journaling.

Scrapbooking to me - STOPS TIME AND ALLOWS ME A MOMENT TO REFLECT AND SAVOR THE LIFE I'VE LIVED!!!

scrapcatz
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Posted: 4/4/2013 9:53:57 AM

I want to tell pretty stories.


I honestly never thought of it that way but that is such an accurate way to describe it.

Mallie
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Posted: 4/4/2013 9:56:24 AM
I've been scrapbooking for more than 40 years, starting in junior high. Back in the day when you bought a scrapbook at Walmart or the local Woolworth's with highly acidic paper and used photo corners or scotch tape or Elmer's glue. In the beginning I wanted to save my mementoes and make a pretty page.

In the early days, as an example -- I often just glued or taped in my birthday cards with some pretty flowers or stickers or whathave you to "pretty up the page". I might stick a photo or 2 in as well. I was happy with the way the page looked when I finished it. All was good. But then...

As time passed and I went back and looked at those pages, I found that they didn't mean much to me. I realized I'd saved them almost because it seemed 'wrong" to throw the mementoes out. But saving them wasn't doing anything for me, because there were no memories attached to them. So I started writing a note or two about the birthday party or the gift I received from that person or why the person gave me a card (inside jokes), etc and THEN those pages got valuable to me.

So saving mementoes and making a pretty page weren't enough for me in the long-term. I learned that FOR ME, what made the page worthwhile in the long term was giving a memory, telling the story.

As scrapbooking became a more developed hobby for me about 7/8 years ago, I started focusing on telling the story because FOR ME that is what experience told me I will find important after the page is done.

I have to note that I am not by nature a journaler. I am not terribly introspective in the sense of wanting to write down some examination of my feelings. But I am a good natural storyteller and I enjoy telling the stories of my experiences in life. I've also learned that if you don't review your memories, you lose them. So I try and use my scrapbooks as my way of capturing those memories by telling the story. I use the photographs AND the embellishments AND the paper to tell the story, just as much as the journaling. It's almost like a visual journal.

HoneyBee13
StuckOnPeas

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Posted: 4/4/2013 10:17:32 AM
I don't think you offended anyone.
^^^^It's hard to tell when I do so I just cover my
bases

I don't worry about if my album is cohesive or not. But that's just me. Everyone has their own feelings on the matter.
^^^^Very True.

your scrapbook groove and stick to it. Play a little, experiement with the trends and pass on the ones that don't speak to you. It's all good
^^^^^Definatly!

STOPS TIME AND ALLOWS ME A MOMENT TO REFLECT AND SAVOR THE LIFE I'VE LIVED!!!
^^^^This is my now montra!

I've also learned that if you don't review your memories, you lose them. So I try and use my scrapbooks as my way of capturing those memories by telling the story. I use the photographs AND the embellishments AND the paper to tell the story, just as much as the journaling. It's almost like a visual journal.
^^^^Great advice.

I have learned that I easily forget and that I want to start writing down the stories that I want to tell. Especially the ones that I keep telling over and over. Time to carry a notebook around for a while.

THanks for all the great advice and inspiration!

LisaDorothy
StuckOnPeas

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Posted: 4/4/2013 10:47:31 AM

Scrapbooking to me - STOPS TIME AND ALLOWS ME A MOMENT TO REFLECT AND SAVOR THE LIFE I'VE LIVED!!!


treyaut -- love that, sums up very nicely how I feel about scrapbooking too.

Realistically, a photo album accomplishes the same thing, so *for me*, without stories it's just not a scrapbook. It's a dolled-up photo album. And I love Shimelle's take-


All hail variety.


To each his own I say. And as I get older, yes I definitely am afraid of forgetting!!! It's a huge motivation for me to write more than the who/where/why info. Even still, I also do many layouts of the "my sister and I went ice-skating" variety, as Shimelle called it! I don't try to pressure myself-- I want my hobby to be fun! It's not an "I must document every story and/or photo" hobby for me, it's a "play with pretty things and tell my kids some cool stuff for later while I do it" kinda thing.

I try to keep in mind things I have heard over and over through the years from Ali, Stacy Julian, etc.-- there is no wrong way to scrapbook. We all have different motivations, goals and talents with our scrapbooking, so do what you do, and don't feel pressure to do what X, Y and Z are doing. It took me several years to realize these things though, and as a beginning scrapper I do remember pressuring myself a lot more. Once I began to let that go, and find my own style, man the creative juices just flow easier!


HoneyBee13
StuckOnPeas

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Posted: 4/4/2013 11:08:05 AM
Once I began to let that go, and find my own style, man the creative juices just flow easier!

^^^Right now I am not scrapping because I want to find what drives me to scrapbook and I really want to find my style, which the style thing is hard because most of my lo are scraplifted.
I am definatly going to be scrapping this process.

writermom1
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Posted: 4/4/2013 11:43:58 AM
I think it was always about telling stories no? I started in 2001 and I recall journaling being the rally cry then.

I do think people feel more free and open to do what they wan't - and leave out what they don't.

Technology has come such a long way that FB, blogs, your cell phone cam, etc. are already documenting many lives. We no longer see our scrapbooks as the sole repository of our memories. When we do scrapbook we may feel more likely to just scrap what we WANT rather than what we feel we SHOULD.

EllenPea
Pea with a Pen

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Posted: 4/4/2013 11:50:26 AM
If scrapbooking was ever one thing to everyone, it has been more than a decade since that was true.

I know this because when I first started scrapbooking, I would have to say my CMC's album was more story-focused than picture-focused. She had lost a son, and every page was a tribute to him. I met her in 2001.

Here at Two Peas, where I have been active just over a decade (and a lurker for a short time before that), art has always been the most important thing to some scrapbookers, and stories to others. I remember a lady teaching a class at my other LSS once said that she had been scrapbooking in the 1990s, was given CM stuff to use, but had paints and stencils that she thought looked great on her scrapbooks of those days.

melanell
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Posted: 4/4/2013 11:52:49 AM
Gosh, I always think that layouts often don't tell enough of the story....mine included.


As the keeper of the old photos for both sides of my family, I find so many photos that we cannot even identify the people shown, never-mind find the story behind.

So I try my best to be sure people are always identified in pictures, not just by name, but by who they are in relation to the family.


I've brought photos to my dad and said "This picture says 'Mrs. Murphy'. Who is Mrs. Murphy? Who is 'Lonnie'? Who is 'Buddy' or 'Siss' or 'Butch' or 'Baby Patrick'?


And sometimes he knows. "Oh, a neighbor down the road.", or "A cousin of some sort", but sometimes the answer is "Beats me. Maybe a friend from work?".


So even though a name is there, which is fabulous, BTW, it's not always quite enough.


And sometimes, I know *who* all the people are, but I have no clue Where they are, When they were there, or What they were doing.

So, I try hard to remember to answer all of those things on my pages. So that someday, a grandchild, or niece, or daughter-in-law won't be going crazy over envelopes of photos that are just a giant question mark to them.

judi7609
PeaNut

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Posted: 4/4/2013 1:54:51 PM
Scrapbooking has always been about telling stories, it's just a matter in what form: pictorial or written.

The right photo will tell the story all on its own, no journaling necessary. Or sometimes, a photo can use the extra supplement.

It really just depends on what you are feeling at the moment.

*Delphinium Twinkle*
I'm just a pea:)

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Posted: 4/4/2013 2:41:23 PM
Hasn't it always been about telling stories?
I think it just evolves.
The stories have always been there, they are just there differently than they were before
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tracyscraplady4life
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Posted: 4/4/2013 2:44:16 PM
I am not sure that scrapbooking ever was not about telling stories? I have done many childhood pages and didn't have one single photo of the actual time that I was talking about of myself in the photo. I used images that reminded me of the things that I was talking about.

I don't think scrapbooking is just one single thing at all.
And if the story that is being told is about what matters to the person or their family, that story should be told. I think it is an awesome idea to tell meaningful stories about what matters to you and your family so that anyone reading the pages can see how something is important or cherished.

Maybe that is what was trying to be expressed? I don't know because I don't know where you heard/saw/read that scrapbooking is about telling stories.

mizzkb00
PeaNut

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Posted: 4/4/2013 2:46:06 PM
I agree with biochemipea....I want to tell pretty stories

PennyPaws
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Loc: Canada

Posted: 4/4/2013 6:38:06 PM
I'm a scrapper because as a kid I stuck everything I found at camp, every ticket stub, and pictures I cut out of magazines into cheap, thin notebooks... I thought of it like my own little 'museum' of all the 'expeditions' I went on... I loved art - fine art, and so that appeals to me... But I have a hard time mixing my 'scientific' collections and documentation of things with the more artsy and collage style of scrapping... I secretly feel like it's either cold, hard, factual documentation of what happened or it's an artistic expression - both happening at the same time confuses me... I like it and wish I could pull that off but my brain can't seem to mix the two

I'm still trying to find my own groove too...

myboysnme
Living life on the left

PeaNut 69,081
February 2003
Posts: 7,959
Layouts: 1

Posted: 4/4/2013 8:02:16 PM
When I used to teach scrapbooking, I used to tell people that scrapbooking now is a combining of an old fashioned memorabilia scrapbook, a photo album, and a diary or journal. It is a book where pages may be just a story or thoughts, or poetry. A page might be just photos, or just memorabilia or artwork, or a combination of any and all of those things. That's how I conceptualize this current hobby of scrapbooking.

alittleintrepid
StuckOnPeas

PeaNut 345,847
November 2007
Posts: 2,438
Layouts: 0

Posted: 4/4/2013 8:20:12 PM
It's not just scrapbooking but our culture and history that tells us to tell stories. It's how we learn our history and identity and develop an understanding of who we are as people. Some storie are told through words, others through art, photos, scrapbooks. How we create and share them is the only difference and vive la difference!

cbee
PeaAddict

PeaNut 383,986
July 2008
Posts: 1,310
Layouts: 20
Loc: Washington

Posted: 4/4/2013 9:09:29 PM
A picture is worth a thousand words. I am not much of a talker, or writer, or a wordy type of person. I tell the story with lots of related photos. Always 3-4 photos per 12x12 with a correlating facing page. Dates, maybe names, place and some back story. And I will attach some tickets, or school handouts in a pocket, etc. Along with some embellies, stamping, or interesting paper layering. I make it fun. But there is rarely more than a small paragraph of words.

cbee
PeaAddict

PeaNut 383,986
July 2008
Posts: 1,310
Layouts: 20
Loc: Washington

Posted: 4/4/2013 9:09:30 PM
A picture is worth a thousand words. I am not much of a talker, or writer, or a wordy type of person. I tell the story with lots of related photos. Always 3-4 photos per 12x12 with a correlating facing page. Dates, maybe names, place and some back story. And I will attach some tickets, or school handouts in a pocket, etc. Along with some embellies, stamping, or interesting paper layering. I make it fun. But there is rarely more than a small paragraph of words.

Loydene
AncestralPea

PeaNut 997
July 1999
Posts: 4,441
Layouts: 12
Loc: Kansas City, MO

Posted: 4/4/2013 9:31:36 PM
I'm late to this party -- but I think the "story telling" aspect has come about because "telling a story" feels more approachable than "journaling". Journaling - which we've all been encouraged to do from the very beginning of this hobby - sounds like it might be graded. But being encouraged to "tell the story" sounds friendly.

And that is an aspect of the very valid point that scrapbooking should be what the person doing it wants it to be. If you are a Chatty Cathy, then go for it; if you are a bullet point, "just the facts, Ma'am" sort, then go for it.

I'll share a story. After her death, I had the opportunity to copy the pictures from my grandmother's photo album. As I went through it, I noticed that I was drawn to the pictures with people in them -- not just scenery or things -- and I really wanted to know who they were and what they were doing -- what was this photo about. The journaling - the story - was missing -- and I missed it.

HoneyBee13
StuckOnPeas

PeaNut 563,248
August 2012
Posts: 2,663
Layouts: 0
Loc: Florida

Posted: 4/4/2013 9:43:40 PM
I GET the telling of stories, I really do. Thank you for helping me to understand! I actually started a list of the stories that I want to tell.
And then I created a lo from the list and I am loving how it turned out.


TracieClaiborne
Perfectionist Pea

PeaNut 23,809
October 2001
Posts: 17,028
Layouts: 386
Loc: Just a short drive from Nashville, TN! (Yee-Haw Ya'll!)

Posted: 4/5/2013 12:22:50 AM
I just wanted to say you certainly didn't offend me with your OP. Pardon my initialy overly enthusiastic response - I was hoping maybe the trend HAD gone towards telling too many stories! I'd love that!!

Also, I love PRT so when someone mentions that, I get excited.

ashazamm
PeaAddict

PeaNut 217,769
August 2005
Posts: 1,056
Layouts: 18
Loc: NY

Posted: 4/5/2013 6:18:33 AM
Some of my pages have a lot of jounaling while others don't. It's all what you want it to be.

tammyd119
PeaFixture

PeaNut 70,488
February 2003
Posts: 3,259
Layouts: 187
Loc: Orlando, FL

Posted: 4/5/2013 7:47:35 AM
For me personally, scrapbooking has changed over the years. When I first started doing it, it was a way to rescue all the things I had kept through the years in those horrible sticky cling albums. I loved the idea of including photos along with the ephemera I had always kept and writing down some thoughts or a story along with it.

But somewhere along the line it became a way to showcase my photos. I got them all out of the photo albums and made pages for all of them. But something was missing. Even if there was "journaling" I often missed actually telling a story or explaining why this was important to me.

And eventually the kinds of things I was documenting changed. At first it was about birthdays and holidays and milestones. But that was no longer motivating to me and I got bored with it. So I started documenting everyday life stuff more and more. But how many 12x12 pages do I really need about my favorite coffee beverage or the awesome Christmas ornament I added to the collection? That got boring too.

In the last couple of years, things changed again. I started doing Project Life to document the everyday and now my traditional 12x12 scrapbook pages are much more about the people in my life, their personalities, the things that make them who they are, who I am, and more and more, the stories I want to remember. Stories that maybe were not reflected in the photos I was taking. I still make pages about holidays and birthdays and events and everyday stuff, but for my scrapbook layouts, I try to focus more on specific stories and the details I never want to forget.

When people talk about documenting stories in their scrapbooks, that's what comes to mind for me.

KBPea
Ancient Ancestor of Pea

PeaNut 395,153
October 2008
Posts: 10,537
Layouts: 139
Loc: Here

Posted: 4/5/2013 8:52:02 AM
Scrapbooking has always been about the stories and the photos for me, but I think the stories are most important. I have some photos that I like but haven't scrapped yet because I don't have a story to go with them. Conversely, I have some stories that don't have a photo to go with them, but I scrap them anyways. I've been scrapbooking for about 5 years, so I don't feel like the story-driven approach is a new development.

HoneyBee13
StuckOnPeas

PeaNut 563,248
August 2012
Posts: 2,663
Layouts: 0
Loc: Florida

Posted: 4/5/2013 9:40:15 AM
@Tracie- I happy for any response it gets me to thinking because I have been trying to figure out what scrapping is to me and now, that I want to go deeper and tell the stories which has always been important to me and why I have taken Kerri Bradford's History class. It didn't dawn on me to put it in my scrapbooks I love PRT and have been listening to it all week on my ipad.

I started PL the beginning of this year and have had problems with it since I started. I don't really like how it looks in the page protectors. I actually did a couple on cardstock and I like it better but I am still not really liking it.

I love the process of PL where I am getting pics printed and I will still get them printed but I am going to give up on PL

Scrapydoglover
BucketHead

PeaNut 193,832
March 2005
Posts: 788
Layouts: 181
Loc: North East PA

Posted: 4/5/2013 6:50:27 PM
Not sure what scrapbooking has turned into..for me I do not always have to tell a the whole story about the photos.....I LOVE the creative part of scrapbooking...I feel that most of my photos do not need to have a story..a photo with names..dates....and lots and lots of cute things on the page....that tells the story...now dont get me wrong....sometimes a story needs to be told...and I am all for that but if you were to look at my albums you would see my family living life and me capturing it and haveing fun with my creative side.....

NoellHyman
AncestralPea

PeaNut 264,910
June 2006
Posts: 4,882
Layouts: 99
Loc: Arizona

Posted: 4/6/2013 2:54:31 PM
First I want to say, "HEY!" to the OP and to all the other PRT listenters here!

I also tend to question my scrapbooking pretty regularly -- why do I do this? What do I most value and how can I make my scrapbooking more valuable to myself?

Now that we have digital photos and it's so easy to view photos on the computer, on TV screens, etc, it's become even more important to me than ever that I have rich stories in my pages -- otherwise it just seems redundant and wasteful (to me) to just print up my photos and put them with paper and embellishments without some added value, such as a good story.

Plus, I'm really enamored with the concept of story and the intense human thirst for it.

Superscrapilicious
StuckOnPeas

PeaNut 292,039
January 2007
Posts: 2,603
Layouts: 41
Loc: Southeast Texas

Posted: 4/6/2013 3:22:01 PM

I gotta break down this OP:

When did scrapbooking turn into just telling stories?

What makes you think it did? Personally, I don't think ENOUGH people are telling their truly important stories, including myself.

When I first started it was all about the pictures and telling the story of what happened in those pictures.
I really believe for most scrappers, it still is. I see many trends happening lately, including lots of product on a page or smaller photos with minimal journaling but too many stories? I'm not seeing that anywhere. I'm not trying to be argumentative - I'd love to see that and know it exists!

Are scrappers afraid of forgetting and trying to get everything they can remember now into their albums?
Yes, absolutely! I certainly am because I have already forgotten so much and my child is only 12 and I am only 42. I barely remember what happened yesterday, let alone 10 years ago. Also, if we don't put our most important stories into our scrapbooks, aren't we just making a decorated photo album? Which....is fine by the way, if that's what you want to do but isn't storytelling what scrapbooking is about, at the core? Maybe not for some, but it is for me.

Sorry trying to figure out what scrapping is for me, because I listened to an OLD PRT and I am curious.
What PRT episode? I would love to know! I am a HUGE PRT fan!


What she said.

There is no "one" definition for scrapbooking or technique. It is how you interpret it. So I am going to use one of Noelle's other interests as an example. Noelle. your love of dance made me think of this example...you are a dancer. Let's say I Jazz dance or cumbias and you do modern or ballet. They are all forms of dance yet are different and use different techniques.

It is the same with scrapbooking. Some are memory makers and want to share the who, what , when where and why only. Some one the picture the tell the story and let their artistic abilities be the ensemble. Others have stories or letters they want to leave for their loved ones and use pictures to be the chorus. And some people are trend followers and will do whatever they "feel" everyone else is doing. We are all blessed with unique reasons and thank everyone for sharing their style here on the Two Peas board.

BUT STOP SHARING ABOUT DEALS BECAUSE MY WALLET CAN'T TAKE ANYMORE OF IT.!!!!!

keddypea
AncestralPea

PeaNut 268,680
July 2006
Posts: 4,931
Layouts: 805
Loc: Wisconsin

Posted: 4/6/2013 3:49:19 PM
I have found that I've take so many photos now that I'm digital that I have more photos of one event than I could ever scrap, so I still do some event based scrapbooking, but those extra photos are often used to tell stories. The longer I do this the more I just journal a line or two about the event and then the rest of the journaling is more story based.

I wish that I had photos with stories from my parent's and my grandparent's past. I would love to have seen the stories of their every day lives, so I guess I will be passing those kinds of books on.

wookiemouse
PeaFixture

PeaNut 268,110
July 2006
Posts: 3,699
Layouts: 37
Loc: New Braunfels, TX

Posted: 4/6/2013 4:31:03 PM
^^^^^ this. I think we've begun to learn from the errors of our ways, that's why it's evolved. I recently inherited my grandmother's scrapbooks, filled with tons of pictures and a few names. How I would have LOVED to hear the stories behind those photos, but she passed away before I was born. I want to make sure that I'm DOCUMENTING life. Not through pictures and embellishments, but through words and emotions. I do have pages where the picture says enough, but most of the time, if it's important enough to me to capture it film, it probably has a good story behind it as well.

HoneyBee13
StuckOnPeas

PeaNut 563,248
August 2012
Posts: 2,663
Layouts: 0
Loc: Florida

Posted: 4/6/2013 9:42:27 PM
I am so thankful that I posted this question because I almost didn't.

I have a lot of pics that were my grandmothers were she did not add names or places or why they were they. I'm so excited to finally get a grip on what scrapbooking is for me Nd I have a lot of help with that from the peas, THANK YOU!
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