Question: do hair product manufacturers really make two versions?
Post ReplyPost New TopicPosted 11/11/2013 by BeckyTech in NSBR Board
 

BeckyTech
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Posted: 11/11/2013 2:46:04 PM
I popped in to a hair place yesterday for a quick trim. While I was waiting, one of the stylists was finishing up with a client and was showing her one of their products. The client asked if it was available at Wal-Mart. The stylist kind of hesitated, told her it was, and then proceeded to tell her that it wasn't the same quality, that they put more alcohol and other bad ingredients into the product they sold at Wal-Mart.

I was just flabbergasted. I really, seriously doubted that, but I'm not 100% sure. It is illogical to me that they would make a cheaper brand, because if it was bad, people wouldn't like it and would not buy it.

The client was youngish and I was hoping she wasn't that gullible. She did not buy the product there. Politely thanked the stylist and made a show of telling her friend that she wanted the product for Christmas. So, I was pretty sure she had not bought into it.

Main question: do manufacturers make different qualities of their hair products to be sold at different places?

If you knew for sure that they didn't, would you have spoken up if the client had actually started to purchase it?

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Posted: 11/11/2013 2:58:03 PM
Creative Memories used to buy stickers through Mrs Grossman's and claim that they had a separate (archival) line for just CM. It wasn't true and Mrs G's wouldn't back it up at all. Plus they were the same exact stickers!

That said, I do know that some manufacturers do have lower level products (different sizes, etc) that are sold between two levels --- such as Coach and Coach Outlet.

So it's not impossible, but I too would have strong doubts! I have bought styling products at Target that I got at my hairdresser and honestly the prices are better, but not by too much. Plus it was the same exact bottle/size/etc. Hard to claim it was different/lower qualit.

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Posted: 11/11/2013 2:58:20 PM
I think that paul mitchell products are different at wally's and costco. And the one that infusimium(sp). Is very different from salon product to store product.

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Posted: 11/11/2013 2:59:23 PM
I don't know about all brands, but I know that there's a product that I like that is only available through salons. Other products in that line are sold in stores, but certain products are salon only.



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Posted: 11/11/2013 3:00:05 PM
I don't know about hair product manufacturers. However, other manufacturers do. The jeans that my husband buys from Walmart have a different code than what look like the same jeans at a different store, and they fit differently. It just happens that he likes the fit of the Walmart ones better. I've also seen slightly different model numbers on electronics items at Walmart, so I'm assuming those are slightly different as well.

Given that Walmart is a huge retailer, it wouldn't surprise me to find out that hair product manufacturers make 2 versions in order to meet the price point that Walmart demands. However, it would seem to me that they'd be shooting themselves in the foot to make something somewhat inferior to their salon product and still label it the same - if you tried the cheaper Walmart version and thought it was crap, you sure wouldn't be willing to spend the bigger bucks at the salon.


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Posted: 11/11/2013 3:56:45 PM

However, it would seem to me that they'd be shooting themselves in the foot to make something somewhat inferior to their salon product and still label it the same - if you tried the cheaper Walmart version and thought it was crap, you sure wouldn't be willing to spend the bigger bucks at the salon.
That was my thinking exactly.

I know that electronics and such come in different models for stores like Costco, Sams, Walmart, but different formulas of hair products seems odd for the reason stated above.

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Posted: 11/11/2013 4:18:59 PM
I would think not for the reasons stated above.

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Posted: 11/11/2013 4:19:50 PM
I don't know that it would make much of a difference when it comes to shooting themselves in the foot. I'm thinking (around here at least) the people who are going to see the 'fancy' products at the wal-mart and buy them aren't the ones that would purchase in a salon or really know the difference. They'd easily be able to make it a little nicer than suave and people would be perfectly fine with it.

I know that my company has a few products that have the exact same name as some of the other similar companies. Our packaging is unique and the ingredients are of a higher quality but it's made and packaged at the same place. You can tell a HUGE difference when you have a bottle from each company side by side. The texture and consistency is WAY different.

Interesting. Now i'm feeling the need to research.




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Posted: 11/11/2013 4:32:53 PM
I've heard that about electronics at Walmart, that several of the electronics companies make a lower quality version so that WalMart can sell them cheaper.

Never really did the research to figure out if that was true or not.


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Posted: 11/11/2013 4:34:04 PM
I don't think the FDA regulations for labeling would allow a company to manufacture two 'different' (even only *slightly* different) preparations of a product and label them with the same exact labeling. I think this would be prohibited by the labeling requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations.

Now if the company was sneaky enough to call the 'lower-grade' product something different, or have some fine print that states it's not quite the same, then maybe it would pass the regulation rules. But from what I know of working in the the medical device industry- and I'm guessing that cosmetics and personal care products have similar labeling requirements- then they *shouldn't* do anything like that.






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Posted: 11/11/2013 4:41:52 PM
When I worked at a salon, we were told by the manufacturers that their products were only guaranteed when they were bought in a salon. Places like Wal-Mart, etc., only had access to close-outs and seconds, e.g. old packaging or warehouse move (where they didn't want to ship products). I know that on the bottles it does say it's only guaranteed when purchased at a salon.

My family's store used to purchase OPI nail polish from a distributor, but all of them had defective bottles, like a portion where the glass wasn't completely clear, or a smudged logo. Seconds, basically, that didn't pass the quality check to be sold in a salon.



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Posted: 11/11/2013 4:52:50 PM
No, they don't. In the industry, it's called "Diversion." You can google it and read more, but basically the manufacturers want to play both sides of the coin. They want to keep their salon clients happy, but also get the distribution of the big box stores. So they claim it wasn't purchased properly, feed the story about quality to salons, and salons vilify "diversion" instead of the manufacturer.

The stuff in the stores is the real deal.

Here's a quick intro to diversion. It's a big deal in the salon world and they'll make you think the products are inferior, but they aren't. Same thing for tanning lotion. Tanning salons sell tanning lotions at INSANE markups, that's a big part of their traditional business model. Some of them won't let you tan there unless you buy their lotion or will use scare tactics like "we won't guarantee the quality of your tan/you'll burn/the product is fake" if you buy it off Amazon. Wrong - product is the same, it's just a way for manufacturers to have their cake and eat it too.

Now, there are product lines out there that make multiple lines for store brand and brand name, but those are labeled differently. That isn't what you're asking about, I don't think.

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Posted: 11/11/2013 5:00:09 PM


If you knew for sure that they didn't, would you have spoken up if the client had actually started to purchase it?


To answer this, no - I wouldn't. I wouldn't step on the business's toes where I'm at.

A similar example: I was recently at the eye doctor's office and they had a guy in there who was really not happy about how expensive his glasses were going to be. I had just ordered several pairs of glasses on Zenni and Coastal online for about 15% of the cost. As much as I wanted to tell him about it, doing it inside the business is not appropriate. Now - if he'd left without buying any and I saw him out in the small parking lot... then I might say something!

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Posted: 11/11/2013 5:00:49 PM
Many of the electronics that are sold cheaper at Walmart have a cheaper part and you won't know it till you go to repair your TV and the repairman has to ask you if you purchased it at Walmart...that is why the serial numbers are close to others in similar stores but have some special - letter or number at the end.

So yes I do believe they will make less inferior products for places like Walmart so they can be sold cheaper.


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Posted: 11/11/2013 5:03:25 PM
This happens in so many industries it's not funny. Most of the time it's the exact same. It happens especially with food - Aldi branded stuff is exactly the same as the big brands just in different packaging. Milk, the same thing.

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Posted: 11/11/2013 7:00:11 PM
Wal-Mart stores have salons in them. The same products are available in those salons or on the shelves in the health and beauty section. I notice that even the shelves in the salon say that the products are only guaranteed if bought in a salon.

Personally I really question whether there is a difference.




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Posted: 11/11/2013 7:05:27 PM

Many of the electronics that are sold cheaper at Walmart have a cheaper part and you won't know it till you go to repair your TV and the repairman has to ask you if you purchased it at Walmart...that is why the serial numbers are close to others in similar stores but have some special - letter or number at the end.

So yes I do believe they will make less inferior products for places like Walmart so they can be sold cheaper.


I think electronics are a totally different story. Does anyone really think they can get the same quality flat screen at WalMart for $300 that they would pay $500 for at Costco? Different TV's have different serial numbers, hair products do not.

ETA: I meant to say different TV's have different model number, not serial numbers.


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Posted: 11/11/2013 7:07:44 PM
Don't you notice when you go to the salon your hair feels so soft and smells so good. When I buy the same stuff at the store it never smells that good!


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Posted: 11/11/2013 10:00:04 PM
Thanks, AN, for that article. It was quite enlightening!


I can tell you all how computers are sold cheaper at the big box stores. It's pretty simple, those are two- and three-year-old model processors and some are even older. They are generally the models of processors that don't have as much cache (memory) on the processor itself.

They don't typically put as much memory (RAM) in the machines as they do machines for sale at other places. (The motherboards may not have additional slots that would allow for more memory, either. Another cost-cutting measure.)

Computer parts are manufactured to certain specifications. The tighter the tolerance to the specification, the higher the quality of the part and those are the parts that go in the "business-class" machines. If the part isn't up to spec to put in a business-class machine it goes into a consumer-class machine.

I imagine that the big box stores get the low end of the parts. They are still within the specifications, but at the low end of the spectrum. Fine for a few hours a day of consumer use. I would also guess that a store like Costco would get computers with better parts than a store like Wal-Mart, where they sell really inexpensive computers.

Heck, I've even seen computers at Wal-Mart that were so cheap they didn't come with an operating system.

So, if you are wondering why a business-class machine needs better parts, I can tell you that too. Not only are they in use all day, but they are networked. Reliable networking requires parts within a tight tolerance. We've had small business clients go out and buy a cheap HP consumer machine and expect us to add it to their little office network. It almost never works on a network. It might work fine for Grandma and Grandpa, though.

Another thing that sets business-class machines apart from consumer-class is that business machines don't come preloaded with crapware. (Yes, it's a real technical term.) Because the parts are a higher quality, the failure rate will be lower as well.

So hopefully now you might understand why I don't recommend you buy your college student a computer from Wal-Mart - it just isn't going to necessarily have the horsepower (processor cache and RAM memory) to keep up with a college student's homework (depending on their classes, of course.)

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Posted: 11/11/2013 10:06:31 PM

Don't you notice when you go to the salon your hair feels so soft and smells so good. When I buy the same stuff at the store it never smells that good!
Yes, I have noticed! What is up with that anyway?

Actually, I've had them tell me that the products they use in-house are not available for sale in the store, but they'll be happy to show me something similar. I expect it's to keep you going back. Frequently. (Doesn't work with me, though.)

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Posted: 11/11/2013 10:09:56 PM
Beckytech

that is why my DH says that it is never worth it to get those insanely cheap computers that big box discount stores have on black friday.

It wont handle much of anything you have to do with it.

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Posted: 11/11/2013 10:20:48 PM
I used to buy hairspray at my salon - it had quite impressive hold without turning my hair into a helmet. I was also able to buy it at a local Walmart-type store. There was no difference that I noticed in how the hairspray performed - but it also wasn't any cheaper at the discount store. The only reason to buy it there was convenience - I was there for something else already.


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Posted: 11/11/2013 10:22:43 PM

Most of the time it's the exact same. It happens especially with food - Aldi branded stuff is exactly the same as the big brands just in different packaging. Milk, the same thing.


I know that's true for most cheese. When I worked at a cheese manufacturing plant, we would put labels for Kraft and next would be the store brand. Also some of the labels said the cheese was from Wisconsin when it was not.

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Posted: 11/11/2013 10:23:26 PM
BeckyTech, could you answer this slightly off topic question? I am planning to buy a dirt cheap laptop for a 6yr old. Plan is for her to be able to Skype without needing to kick someone else off their computer, and to play 6yr old level games- like pbskids.org or nickjr.com type things. Have been advised to have her start learning keyboarding, due to her medical complications, so if I can find some learning type games for her level with that as well.

Will I be making a big mistake with a cheap one from Wal-Mart? I realize a more expensive one will be better, but I can only afford so much for this project because there are SO many things that she needs all the time, and frankly a laptop is not a necessity. I am thinking that she will be a very light user and things like this have a limited life anyway. Your thoughts?




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Posted: 11/11/2013 10:25:19 PM

A similar example: I was recently at the eye doctor's office and they had a guy in there who was really not happy about how expensive his glasses were going to be. I had just ordered several pairs of glasses on Zenni and Coastal online for about 15% of the cost. As much as I wanted to tell him about it, doing it inside the business is not appropriate.
Isn't that a different situation?

You knew where the guy could purchase his glasses cheaper, but you are right, it would not be appropriate to speak up at the business. That would be his responisbility to do his homework just like you did.

However, in the situation I'm describing, the client was being given information that was flat out wrong. I guess it's possible the stylist didn't know that - it could have been what she was told. Except the way she was telling it you could almost tell she knew she was on shaky ground.

Eh, I doubt I'll be in that position again, I probably don't have to worry about it. I also expect it could be done very diplomatically so that you aren't "calling out" or directly accusing the employee of anything, just doing a gentle correction/education. Kind of along the lines of "You know what, I recently read an article about that and it turns out it is the same."

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Posted: 11/11/2013 10:39:13 PM
I highly doubt the companies make inferior versions for the big box stores, for the reasons already brought up. That being said, I have heard SOOOOO many hairdressers say this and get irritated each time. Last week I was at Ulta and was asking the consultant about the different Clarisonic brush heads. She then went into telling me that I should be using higher end cleansers and products because they are "dermatologist tested". I told her that I was informed on what I use, but she continued to argue that Cetaphil is for people with eczema and that Dermalogica would be better. Her attitude really turned me off.



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Posted: 11/11/2013 11:01:30 PM
The products sold in salons are guaranteed and can be returned if you have a problem. They're also more expensive because the person who sells the product to you gets a 15-20% commission on product sales.
That's the way it was done when I worked at a salon in high school.
Some of the sales people from the product lines did say that the products in other big box stores were knockoffs...packaging is slightly different etc...


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Posted: 11/11/2013 11:10:19 PM
FWI many of the Aldi/Trader Joe's brands ARE made at the same plants as other "named" brands in the supermarket. Different outer package.

Salon vs stores, packaging might be different. Checking UPCs will not help since UPCs are based more on the packaging that the product.

Please note that counterfeiting is BIG business and you would be sick over the items that are counterfeited. A difference between two of the same products could be from counterfeiting, not two different grades of the same product from the manufacturer.


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Posted: 11/11/2013 11:21:45 PM
beachgurl, I have a couple of thoughts.

First, a Windows-based computer does require maintenance. It requires an anti-virus software that updates itself regularly (most reputable products do at least 4 times a day) and so on. The operating system and other common software needs regular updates and temp files need to be cleaned out.

My first choice in your situation would be an iPad because those require no maintenance and there are a plethora of apps available for just that target market. Because she's only 6, I'm going to guess you could probably get away with the cheapest model - a 16GB. She isn't going to be able to have a lot of movies AND apps, but it would be plenty of space for apps. You would certainly be fine with an iPad 2 - they have a nice long battery life, put it in a sturdy case and you're done.

You don't need one with 3G (unless she has a data plan), wi-fi only is fine. You might want to price out a refurb from Apple, I've heard good things about those.

If you do want a Windows-based laptop, then absolutely, for a 6 year-old, a Wal-Mart computer would be fine. Understand you will probably get about 3 years out of it - that is probably about how long the hard drive will be likely to last.

I don't necessarily recommend a second-hand Windows-based computer because people usually want to sell them for far more than they are worth. I would never consider a refurb. No way. Now if you know of someone who is about to upgrade and will sell you their old one (that they've taken care of and is trouble-free) for super cheap, then sure, take it. However, if they've had it for more than a couple of years, it's ready to be flattened. After a while, the registry starts to degrade and computers that were previously robust start to slow down, so wiping them clean and reinstalling from scratch is the way to breathe new life into them.

You can get a brand new iPad 2 wifi for $399 and with Christmas coming up you will see stores offering them for about that price, but with $50 or so of store gift cards thrown in. I don't know how that would compare to an iPad refurb.

I just went and looked at Wal-Mart laptops and of the brands they offer, I would only buy a Toshiba, Acer, or a Samsung. Stay very far away from the other brands. Their lower-end models only have Celeron processors. That would be a big huge NO! Not even for a 6-year-old. I could tell you why a Celeron is the Devil's Spawn, and will if you ask, but to keep this short, just NO! And OMG, they actually are trying to unload a refurb Gateway. Despicable!

Since HPs are absolutely out, and Dell laptops are out (their desktops are great, laptops not so much, especially for a 6 year-old because of the keyboards) well now you are getting into new iPad territory as far as cost. Unless they have some good sales coming up - which they might.

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Posted: 11/12/2013 11:28:13 AM
Thanks BeckyTech. I figured you were the one to run it past.

No, she won't have a data plan. Even I don't. Just using wireless connections at home with her family or possibly at hotels with me. I figure 3 years is about what you can expect from computers these days. I certainly stretch that at times, but I do realize they have an "expiration date". $399 is more than I'll be able to put towards this, but I'll keep that, and your other tips, in mind. Thanks.




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Posted: 11/12/2013 12:11:02 PM
I believe that a lot of companies do that. A good example of this is Gelatos. Faber Castell has been selling a much cheaper version under the name of Gel Sticks for years. They say the difference is that the Gelatos are acid-free and specifically formulated for this, that, and the other but many say there is no difference. I've also heard that they prefer the Gel Sticks to the Gelatos.
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Posted: 11/12/2013 12:21:50 PM
Hijack-Beckytech-I got my now 16 yo DD a refurbished Dell laptop from my computer guy about a year or two ago. I've been using it some and the keyboard drives me nuts. I don't know what I'm doing, but it often jumps and then sometimes deletes entire paragraphs. What is with their keyboard?




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Posted: 11/12/2013 12:25:27 PM
refurb deals from Apple You might consider the iPad mini. It's a decent size. Like I said, there are many apps that help with coordination and such if that is what you are seeking. These come with an Apple warranty. $249. iPad 2 $319.

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Posted: 11/12/2013 12:27:49 PM

What is with their keyboard?
You've just hit on the reason I no longer recommend Dell laptops. The keyboards are not good, and in some cases are integral with the motherboard, making repairs very expensive.

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Posted: 11/12/2013 1:08:58 PM

FWI many of the Aldi/Trader Joe's brands ARE made at the same plants as other "named" brands in the supermarket. Different outer package.


Yes this is true, that is the TJ's business model. I thought the products can sell cheaper because the company doesn't pay for advertising costs of the brand.

However I use Kerastase Nutritive Masquintense Intense Highly Concentrated Nourishing Treatment which retails for $60 at major salons and at drugstore.com, however I was tipped off at makeupalley that L'oreal (the same parent company) makes a cheaper drugstore version of it. I purchased it once and while I could tell it was similiar and had the same ingredients, I really thought it was a lesser version somehow. Like less percentage of the ingredients or not the higher quality of it.




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Posted: 11/12/2013 3:06:31 PM
No, they don't. In the industry, it's called "Diversion." You can google it and read more, but basically the manufacturers want to play both sides of the coin. They want to keep their salon clients happy, but also get the distribution of the big box stores. So they claim it wasn't purchased properly, feed the story about quality to salons, and salons vilify "diversion" instead of the manufacturer.

The stuff in the stores is the real deal.

Here's a quick intro to diversion. It's a big deal in the salon world and they'll make you think the products are inferior, but they aren't. Same thing for tanning lotion. Tanning salons sell tanning lotions at INSANE markups, that's a big part of their traditional business model. Some of them won't let you tan there unless you buy their lotion or will use scare tactics like "we won't guarantee the quality of your tan/you'll burn/the product is fake" if you buy it off Amazon. Wrong - product is the same, it's just a way for manufacturers to have their cake and eat it too.

Now, there are product lines out there that make multiple lines for store brand and brand name, but those are labeled differently. That isn't what you're asking about, I don't think.

Sorry folks...not sure how to quote so I just copied his and pasted it. You are right and wrong at the same time. I own a hair, nail and tanning salon. It is called DIVERSION. But, it isn't necessarily the "real deal" as you put it. These products that you purchase at Walmart, Target, etc are not direct from manufacturers. They are purchased as closeouts from warehouses, bigchain salons, etc. So, there is no guarantee that you are getting what you purchase. I have heard stories of watered down product. Product switched out for cheaper off brand products, etc. So, it is crap shoot to buy it.

Now to say that we do huge markups is insane! We are the little guys and we are regulaed by the manufacturers as to what price point we set our products at. The huge markups are at the chain stores and big name store. Many times I will see products on their shelves on sale for less than what my cost is. So, the big mark-up comment is not accurate.

Diversion is frustrating. We as Cosmetologists take many years of training and continued training throughout our careers. We research products and test products at our own cost so that we can present our clients with facts and info on the products we sell. We stand behind what we sell.

Always buy from your stylist. They will be able to tell you exactly hat works for your hair, texture, etc.

beachgurl
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Posted: 11/12/2013 5:38:11 PM

We stand behind what we sell.



So here is the catch, Wal-Mart and the chain drugstores will stand behind the products they sell too. You can return an opened product if it doesn't meet your standards.




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Posted: 11/12/2013 7:24:32 PM

These products that you purchase at Walmart, Target, etc are not direct from manufacturers. They are purchased as closeouts from warehouses, bigchain salons, etc. So, there is no guarantee that you are getting what you purchase. I have heard stories of watered down product. Product switched out for cheaper off brand products, etc. So, it is crap shoot to buy it.
I just have a real hard time believing that places like Wal-Mart and Target, that regularly stock a product (years), have people in the back watering down or switching out product. It doesn't make sense. They buy product by the truckload, and if they aren't getting it from the manufacturer, where are they getting it from?

There are places like Big Lots that do buy leftovers and seconds, but even they are a national chain and it seems unlikely they would be messing with individual bottles of product. A small store that does buy overages, that I could see. But not a giant the size of Wal-Mart or Target.


Many times I will see products on their shelves on sale for less than what my cost is.
Now this I can identify with, the same thing happens in the computer business. There are places that are dealer-only accessible, and it's true, we often see the same thing on the manufacturer website or at Office Depot for less than what those companies [want to] charge us. Which is one of the reasons that selling equipment is no longer a big part of our business model.

AN
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Posted: 11/12/2013 7:40:48 PM

Many times I will see products on their shelves on sale for less than what my cost is.

Now this I can identify with, the same thing happens in the computer business. There are places that are dealer-only accessible, and it's true, we often see the same thing on the manufacturer website or at Office Depot for less than what those companies [want to] charge us. Which is one of the reasons that selling equipment is no longer a big part of our business model.


Yep, very true. And the people to be mad at in this situation (for salons) isn't the big box store that's selling it - it's the manufacturer/brand that told you it was going to be a "salon exclusive" product and then went back on their word when the chance to sell at a larger outlet came along.

The bad guy in diversion isn't the small store or the big store, it's the manufacturer that's trying to play both sides of the coin. They feed this story to their smaller stores that it was illegally diverted, they had nothing to do with it, blah blah blah - but the supply chains show that the manufacturer is often the one doing the "diversion" and selling to the large stores.

Kennabeans, you sound really nice and I bet you're a great stylist! But I think your perspective just sort of shows my point, that the manufacturers are pushing this story about diversion on the salons and salons are repeating it to their customers. It just isn't true in the vast majority of cases.


Isn't that a different situation?

You knew where the guy could purchase his glasses cheaper, but you are right, it would not be appropriate to speak up at the business. That would be his responisbility to do his homework just like you did.

However, in the situation I'm describing, the client was being given information that was flat out wrong. I guess it's possible the stylist didn't know that - it could have been what she was told. Except the way she was telling it you could almost tell she knew she was on shaky ground.

Eh, I doubt I'll be in that position again, I probably don't have to worry about it. I also expect it could be done very diplomatically so that you aren't "calling out" or directly accusing the employee of anything, just doing a gentle correction/education. Kind of along the lines of "You know what, I recently read an article about that and it turns out it is the same."


Yeah, I can see how it's slightly different. For me personally though, both are just a matter of respecting the business owner of the business you're in. I don't think it's right to correct staff at a store in a conversation I'm not involved in, particularly when it is something that supports their livelihood. (I can think of plenty of exceptions to this, before anyone jumps on that... if it was dangerous to someone, then yeah, I'd correct them - but this is just a $$ issue.)

On a separate note, a lot of people in this thread are confusing the issues of brand name vs store brand (which no one is debating, manufacturers package the same product under different names and also packages similar but inferior products under different names). That is totally different than diversion which is when a supposedly "exclusive" brand shows up in a big box retailer and is the same exact product - no different brand name.

KristinL16
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Posted: 11/12/2013 8:45:18 PM

These products that you purchase at Walmart, Target, etc are not direct from manufacturers. They are purchased as closeouts from warehouses, bigchain salons, etc. So, there is no guarantee that you are getting what you purchase. I have heard stories of watered down product. Product switched out for cheaper off brand products, etc. So, it is crap shoot to buy it.




Seems that the only people who are telling these stories are people who work in salons. And those stories are most likely stories from people who heard the stories, who heard the stories.



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Posted: 11/12/2013 8:51:23 PM
I started using Tigi Bedhead Frizz control (it is a green gel) about 12 years ago. It worked great. I found it at a salon and purchased from them for many years. Then, around 2009 or so, I saw it on the shelf at Target. It was a few dollars cheaper so I started buying it there. Over time, I noticed that it just wasn't working nearly as effectively as it had in previous years. It seemed "watered down" specifically. This discussion here is interesting. I am going to buy 2 bottles from a salon and try them and see if there is a quality difference. I'm really hoping there is because I want that same quality back!!

Is product from Ulta considered to be "direct from manufacturer" and the supposedly higher quality. They are in my area. For some reason the salon my DD has been using doesn't carry it.

Grom Pea
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Posted: 11/12/2013 9:25:01 PM
It could be seconds, not purposely watered down but something was not quite right during manufacture, I shop at grocery outlet, which I love because groceries are 50% off from regular stores, but I've noticed some things like cream cheese may have a bubble in it so you don't get the full weight, or ice cream, so I imagine the shampoo they get might not be filled up all the way even if its the same. I don't care though, the prices are so cheap that its still an amazing deal even if I get half an ounce less lotion, shampoo etc (which I haven't experienced yet, just an example)


My blog: http://rollerscrapper.blogspot.com/

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Posted: 11/12/2013 10:55:01 PM

For me personally though, both are just a matter of respecting the business owner of the business you're in. I don't think it's right to correct staff at a store in a conversation I'm not involved in, particularly when it is something that supports their livelihood.
You're right. I'm sure those gals in the chains don't make that much on haircuts and rely on selling product. I wouldn't want to ruin their day by taking a sale away from them. Like the glasses situation you described, it's the consumer who needs to do their homework.

And thanks for helping me do my homework, BTW.

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Posted: 11/12/2013 11:03:28 PM

It could be seconds, not purposely watered down but something was not quite right during manufacture,
That kind of makes sense. Sort of along the lines of parts that qualify as "business class" vs. "consumer class" for computers?
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