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Our last day of Design School!

Hello and welcome to our last day of Design School.  These past three weeks have been a blast; we've packed in so much and have been blown away by how you've applied the principles we've been learning to your projects.  Thanks for playing along!

We've seen samples from the Garden Girls, our special guests, gallery spotlights and work from Erica and myself - today we're going to take a look at how a few manufacturers include these principles in their designs.  

Who better to hear from about these designs than our buyer herself?  Here is Kristina with her "picks" as she shares how these principles can be seen in a handful of lines in the Two Peas store, as well as how these products can help us use these principles in our creativity.  Be sure to scroll down for a special freebie and challenge.

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Today's Featured Products: My Little Shoebox | Lawn Fawn Stamps | Unity Stamps

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Next, we have a freebie for you!  Because who doesn't love some extra goodies in their stash of supplies?  This sheet of freebies is full of fun and bright colors, perfect for looking back on your colorful Summer.  Just click on the image to download/print and enjoy!

Special Bonus Challenge!  Now for your special bonus challenge, an "extra credit" assignment if you will: I'm challenging you to use an element (or 2 or 3 or 4...) from this sheet of freebies in a project that incorporates the principles of Rhythm and/or Proportion.  I'm giving TWO randomly selected challenge winners a a prize pack made up of My Little Shoebox goodness - one of the brands you saw in today's video.  You have one week to upload your project to the member gallery - don't forget to check the challenge checkbox under 'Member challenges.' The challenge winners will be announced on the Two Peas Education message board forum.

Thanks so much for joining us for this series - we hope you enjoyed it as much as we enjoyed bringing it to you! - Jamie

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Blog Post

Week 3 Day 4 of Design School: Typography in Design

Welcome to another day of Design School!  Today we'll be studying Typography as an element in Design.  Before we do, Erica Hernandez, our digital product manager, and I have a couple projects to share with you where we've used this week's principles:

Erica has combined both principles in her page.  By enlarging her ariel photo and keeping it in color, while the other photos she's scaled down and changed to black and white, she's used Proportion.  She's also used rhythm by adding a scroll to the end of the airplane wing, further reinforcing the theme of travel and giving it a sense of movement.

I've created a page for this week too, also combing both principles into one page.  As I mention in my description, by enlarging the swirl of elements above my head and filling it with all kinds of interesting accents, I've used the principle of proportion. It's not about me, rather what's on my mind. Also, by tilting and varying sizes of the accents, placing them all along a circular "track" of journaling, I've created rhythm, or movement.

 

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Now, let's move on to typography.  I've dug up some examples from the gallery and designer garden and come up with a list of 10 ways to push this element of design in our projects.  Ready to begin?

1.  Substitute a character with another element or shape.  Mooner363 has used brads for the dots in her characters, as well as replaced a "G" with an "8."

2.  Trace or draw an enlarged letter and then stitch over it, adding texture to your project.

3.  Print your text in "white."  While it's not possible to print in white, you can change your text to white in a word processing program, place a filled color/text box behind it, and then print on white cardstock.

4.  Create a tone-on-tone look by placing matching numbers and/or letters over a coordinating piece of cardstock.

5.  Use pre-made word art like the months in this digital page for a shortcut.  The designers have done the work for you!  This can also be achieved with traditional supplies like die-cuts, stamps, etc.

6.  Mix it up!  Use multiple font styles for added fun; script fonts and more modern styles can be interesting when paired together.

7.  When arranging your type on your piece, keep the space between your lines a little tighter while still being careful it is legible.  This can help give the illusion your type is one unit.

 
8.  Use older alpha stickers as masks and spray over them with ink.  It's both a fun technique to try and gives an artistic look!
 
 
9. Change the color of just one word for added emphasis!
 
 
10, Place journaling within a shape - you can do this by hand or on the computer.  It's unexpected and gives a unique "home" for your stories.
 
I hope this gives you more ideas for using type in your projects.  A couple other additional resources?  The hundreds of fonts we have in the store, as well as alpha digital kits.  Lastly, if you haven't already check out the series on typography by past Garden Girl Kelly Purkey for more ideas!  See you tomorrow for our final day of Design School!
 

9/8/2011 11:23:42 AM | Comments (0) | Send a Message (PeaMail) | Vote for this Blog Post

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Blog Post

Week 3 Day 3 Of Design School: More on Rhythm & Proportion

Week 3 Day 3 of Design School

Hi Peas!  Welcome to another day of Design School.  We have just a couple days left - can you believe it!?  We'll begin today's post with a new layout and video from Nichol Magouirk as she uses the principle of proportion in her project.  Scroll to the bottom of this post for a print-out of sketches, color combos and tips from yesterday's guest projects.

 

Notice that she's not only used scale to decide the size of her photos, but in doing so and arranging her composition she's also achieved balance.  Many of the principles can be combined at once!  Click on the image to hear more from Nichol and to watch her video.

Now that we've shown you a new project, let's dig into past gallery projects we've spot and explore further how these principles have been used, beginning with Rhythm:

   

The text and circles in these layouts give a sense of movement and seem to jump off the page at you.  These pages remind us to push our products to help achieve these principles.  Different colors of paint and simple pop dots under punched circles go a long way!

Elements of nature that have a natural rhythm to them can help tell our message, just like these raindrops.  Think also of wind, waves, rays of sunshine, and snow - placing and repeating them in our projects give us a sense we're there within the scene.

   

When pairing patterns together, remember the principle of proportion.  It's both interesting and easier on the eye when matching large-scaled patterns with smaller-scaled patterns, as we see in the layouts above.  "Our Chicago Date" gives another example of how we can create scenes with proportion.  She's carefully trimmed the photos so that they fit inside the buildings.

We've seen examples of using different sizes in scale to emphasize the difference in proportion, but choosing equal or similar size elements can be advantageous as well, not to mention helpful in achieving balance.

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I hope these extra examples are helpful to you!  Join us tomorrow as we have a couple more projects for you as well as a lesson on typography! - Jamie

To download yesterday's guest projects with sketches, color combos and design tips, click here.

 

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Blog Post

Week 3 Day 2 of Design School: Special Guest Projects

Hello there design students!  I hope you all were able to squeeze in some crafting time for yourself  these last few days, and that our friends in the US enjoyed your holiday weekend.  After yesterday's lesson, we've now introduced you to all 6 design principles.  I hope within this batch you're finding principles that are both fun and challenging!

Are you ready to see how this week's special guests interpreted the principles?  I thought so!  Before we get started, a reminder:  you'll want to scroll down to the bottom of this post for a printable of sketches, color combos and design tips from yesterday's batch of Garden Girl projects.  Okay, here are our fabulous guest projects!

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Ddobson and Pamelacy have used various sizes of butterflies and hearts, arranging them on their project so that it looks as if they are dancing across the page.

   

Enlarging a favorite photo or design element has been a popular choice for using the principle of proportion.  Laura Vegas had so much fun with this one she created two layouts for us!  I love the way she's played with her title for her layout on the right; enlarging the word "little" and shrinking the word "big" is unexpected and interesting!

   

Baersgarten brings focus to the muddy boots in her photo by enlarging it; she makes a good point in her description when she says the smaller photos help give the larger context.  While you may have a favorite photo within a group, consider including others in a smaller size to help fill in the blanks of a story.  Vanessa1978 experiments with size in this trio of cards; mixing up the size and composition can add variety in your process if you choose to create cards in bulk.

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Be sure to click on the layouts to read more from the designers and leave some love for them as well with a comment or two!  Join us tomorrow as we explore more ways for using these principles and hear from Nichol Magouirk in her From Start to Finish video series!

To download and print a set of sketches, color combos and design tips from yesterday's batch of Garden Girl projects, click here.

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Challenge

Week 3 of Design School: Rhythm & Proportion

Welcome to our final week of Design School!  I hope you've had a great weekend and are inspired to gear up for another lesson; today we'll be studying the principles of Rhythm and Proportion.  Scroll down to see a new batch of projects from our Garden Girls and access the downloadable PDF of today's lesson.  I hope you'll play along in the homework as we have more goodie boxes to give away!  Ready to get started?  Let's begin!

 

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Let's start with Rhythm.  This principle can be defined as repetition with variety.  It is possible that when one repeats a pattern over and over it can become so unified it gets a little bit boring - think of the checkerboard pattern, for example.  By varying things like size and color, you can add interest to the repeating design.

Rhythm can also be interpreted as giving a sense of movement within a piece.  This can be done with obvious elements like waves on a beach-y card, or with more subtle shapes and lines that inspire your eye to bounce from one accent to the next.  

Here are a few examples I found in our gallery that display rhythm:

 

   

 

These pages are stunning, aren't they?!  A grouping of butterflies in varying sizes and color seem to swoosh off the page, while bold lines mimic the wings and flight of a butterfly.

 

   

 

An easy way to add movement to a page is to put your title on a curve.  Circular elements add curves when you're wanting to avoid a boxy layout or card.  See the flames on the soccer ball of Shannon's page?  While we've seen larger scale pieces demonstrating rhythm, Shannon shows it can also be done with small accents like the flame trailing the soccer ball.

 

   

 

Mlepea could have paused after adhering the horizontal strips on her paper-pieced present, but instead she's put the icing on the cake by twisting and curling a fiber piece over each strip.  How fun is that!?  Paige22 takes patterns that hold repeating designs to a new level by cutting them apart, placing them askew and adding buttons, stitching and more.

 

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Next, let's study the principle of Proportion.  This principle has to do with the relationship in size among elements, or ratio.  Proportion is how we make sense of the placement and belonging of objects like in the "scenes" below:

 

When we create scenes such as these, we are careful to keep elements scaled in a realistic way.

Proportion can help create depth in a piece; not just in our papercrafting, but in photography too:

And finally, proportion can work with emphasis to bring focus in a layout simply by increasing the scale:

   

   

 

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See more examples and tips for how rhythm and proportion can be used by taking a look at these projects from the Garden Girls:

   

   

   

 

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This week's challenge/homework: Use rhythm and/or proportion in your project.  Upload your project to the member gallery; you have through next Sunday, the 11th, to enter.  Be sure to check the challenge checkbox under 'member challenges' to enter.  We'll see you tomorrow as we check out the projects from our special guest! - Jamie

To download today's printable lesson, click here.

 

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Challenge

Week 2 Day 5 of Design School: Kristina's Picks & A Free Printable

 

We've come to the conclusion of our second week in Design School - we have one week left to pack it all in!  You guys have been doing an amazing job with your homework, and I'm loving your enthusiasm in our discussion.  Best students ever!

I hope you've enjoyed the lessons we've packed in as we've taken a look at the principles of Emphasis and Repetition, as well as the using color in our designs.  We've seen samples from the Garden Girls, our special guests, gallery spotlights and work from Erica and myself - today we're going to take a look at how a few manufacturers include these principles in their designs.  

Who better to hear from about these designs than our buyer herself?  Here is Kristina with her "picks" as she shares how these principles can be seen in a handful of lines in the Two Peas store, as well as how these products can help us use these principles in our creativity.  Be sure to scroll down for a special freebie and challenge, as well as a printable from yesterday's lesson.

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Featured products: Off to School by Fancy Pants | Random by Crate Paper | Bella Blvd Finally Fall

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Next, we have a freebie for you!  Because who doesn't love some extra goodies in their stash of supplies?  And now that it's September and Fall is just around the corner here in the States, we've included some Autumnal journaling labels.  Just click on the image to download/print and enjoy!

 

Now for your special bonus challenge, an "extra credit" assignment if you will: I'm challenging you to use an element (or 2 or 3 or 4...) from this sheet of freebies in a project that incorporates the principles of Emphasis and/or Repetition.  'm giving TWO randomly selected challenge winners a a prize pack made up of Crate Paper and Fancy Pants goodness - one of the brands you saw in today's video.  You have one week to upload your project to the member gallery - don't forget to check the challenge checkbox under 'Member challenges."

Lastly, if you found yesterday's lesson on using color in design helpful and would like a copy, click here to download and print.

That's a wrap for this week!  See you on Monday as we explore...

RHYTHM & PROPORTION!

- Jamie

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See past lessons | See this week's homework (Due Sunday night by 11:59 pm CST) | Join in on the Discussion | See Challenge Winners

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Blog Post

Week 2 Day 4 of Design School: Color in Design & More on Emphasis & Repetition

 

Hello Peas!  Welcome back to another day of Design School.  We've got another project for your from our Digi Manager, Erica Hernandez, as well as a lesson on color!

Isn't her page fantastic?!  She's combined both principles into one layout this week.  Be sure to click on the layout and read her notes on how.

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Color can be a powerful tool and element when we set out to create our next project. Though if you're like me, the big wide world of color and its millions of hues can also be a little overwhelming - where and how do I begin? What do I pair with what? I suggest first deciding what message it is that you'd like to convey in your work, and let that be a creative challenge for you in guiding your use of color. Today we're going to explore how we can more effectively use color in our designs, the associations we make with specific hues, and finally, turn to our trusty color wheel.


What purpose does color serve? Can you imagine living in a world of blacks, whites, and grays? How dull and lifeless that would be! Not only does color bring beauty, but in design it can create a mood, add meaning and guide the eye, bringing focus.

   

SuperiorPea has carefully chosen a muted color palette that helps give a sense of peace and tranquility in her layout about a dream getaway. Allison Waken clusters elements of green, including a large arrow, that forces your eye to zoom in on her subjects.

Color can also be associated with specific emotions, or evoke emotions. Some of these are obvious as we see them in nature, and others are more psychological. It's important to note our associations are also very influenced by our culture; color can mean different things in different places. For example, in western cultures white is often associated with purity and is the traditional color for a bridal gown; in eastern cultures, red is worn by brides as it has connotations of happiness and prosperity. Let's take a look at these associations:

   
Red is the color of fire and blood; it can mean anger, power, passion or love. Orange is a citrus-y color and can bring warmth and a fun energy to a piece. Be careful though - neon oranges and yellows, because they are so bright, are used to give a sense of alarm. This is why construction zones are peppered with these colors! A restaurant like McDonald's has a red and yellow color combination - warm colors. We like our food hot, and thus this warm color palette can trigger hunger.

   

A friendly yellow, the color we link to sunshine, is a nice choice for a wedding card as it hints at both the joy of the occasion and the couple's bright future. We see so much green in nature; it's no wonder we think of growth and vegetation. A fresh and cheerful hue like this one is a great choice for a background as it is both easy on our eyes and the cool color recedes. Green is also the color of our US dollar and so it can also be linked to greed; a darker shade linked to jealousy.

   

The color of sky and water, blue, is naturally associated with feelings of refreshment and tranquility. Minty greens and cool blues make us think of feeling clean; you don't see toothpaste commercials using brown and red! Purple is the color of mystery, magic and royalty. It's interesting this rich color is created by combining the warmest warm - red - and the coolest cool - blue.

   

The color of chocolate and coffee, two of my very best friends, is brown! This earthy color can give a warm and cozy feel. Black often reminds us of sorrow when used as more than just an accent color; here it is the color of mourning and can effectively communicate seriousness like in the layout above.

 

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We're lucky manufacturers understand the big world of color; they do a lot of the work for us by choosing a palette and creating a paper collection around it. There are also gobs of color combos on the internet for when we're needing a shortcut (I love these!). Today though, we'll turn to our friend the color wheel so that we can be even more equipped to use this element of design effectively. The color wheel is reliable and will never let you down!
 

Do you remember from art class that primary colors are made up of red, blue and yellow, and secondary colors, green, orange and violet, are those created by combining the primary colors? These make up the basics of the color wheel. By combining certain hues in the color wheel we can create combinations that are pleasing to the eye.

   

A primary color palette is often used in marketing for young kids; we associate this simple scheme with school and "getting back to the basics." (Although these examples add a little orange...)

A secondary color palette is made up of those hues that sit next to the primaries on the color wheel.  Notice this is often a color palette used for Halloween lines?

A monochromatic layout can be a stunning piece, and simple, by using one hue. By adding blacks (shades), whites (tints), and greys (tone), you can still vary the colors.

An analogous color palette can look similar to a monochromatic in that it's very unified within one color family, but look more closely, it is made up of a handful of colors next to each other on the color wheel.

A complimentary color scheme is by combining two colors opposite from each other on the color wheel. A split complimentary is made up of three hues, two of them being those beside the opposite hue.

I will leave you with one last property of color I find to be fascinating - a little thing called simultaneous contrast. When I learned about this it was like a light bulb went off! It is the idea that there can be an illusion created when pairing up colors. A color can appear different than it's true hue once placed on another background.

It was explained to me like this: think of a rainy, grey day in the fall. Have you ever been on a drive and looked at the changing leaves (depending on where you are in the world!), and the oranges and yellows in the leaves seem so very vibrant? This is because on a grey and rainy day, the dull sky makes the leaves to appear even more vibrant than they actually are. At the same time, the bright oranges and yellows make the sky even more gray than it actually is. I'll let you ponder how you can keep that in mind when papercrafting!

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That wraps up today's lesson on color! I hope this has been helpful addition for you in our library of Design School lessons. We'll see you tomorrow with another Kristina's Picks video, printable lesson from today, a freebie and special bonus challenge! - Jamie

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