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Guest Tutorial: Steampunk Horse by Cindy Dauer

This week’s guest tutorial is by Cindy Dauer. Her whimsical artwork caught our eye, and we asked to share one of her step-by-step walkthroughs with Copic fans. Enjoy, and thank you for sharing, Cindy!

Tell us a bit about yourself!
I was tragically talked out of art school and instead got a couple Humanities degrees. I had a small t-shirt business painting whimsical, monstery beasts on T-shirts for a while as an undergrad.  Then for most of the next twenty years I let the art go.  But in the last 7-8 months I have really re-dedicated myself to art, and Copics have actually been a big part of that. Of course, at 42, I wonder what might have been if I’d gone to art school.
But really the best thing I can do is do what I really want to do today and stop grouching about the past. I hope to put a children’s book together in the Winter of 2011-2012 with many of the beasts and their stories I’ve had such a blast drawing up in the last several months.

How did you get into using Copics?
I can actually point to two Etsy artists who probably most inspired me to use Copics.  The color they achieved was so exceptional I had to try them.  I had been concentrating on pen and ink techniques rather than painting, and adding markers would complement that in a painterly way without actually dealing with paint tubes, brushes, cleaning solutions, paint splatter, etc! Plus pen and ink seems to suit me best.

The first is bconnordesign, the first shop I favorited at Etsy about 8 months ago when I was deciding to really dedicate myself to art again. I particularly like her use of color on color: http://www.etsy.com/shop/bconnordesign

The second, and very different artist, is Sundevar, who achieves insanely rich colors (and just does seriously weird and interesting stuff): http://www.etsy.com/shop/Sundevar


Steampunk Donkey Horse Original Art

More steampunk.  More Copics.  Another progression photo post! As you can see, the colors are somewhat more subdued than they have been, which was a conscious choice in an effort to replicate a little bit of the flavor of older, maybe even colorized, photography.  This horse is not living in modern times, after all!

Figure One: Steampunk Donkey Horse Ink

I was referencing a photo of a donkey, the narrowing of the face seems to have made a horse instead. I added a pipe but I was not sold on it yet, so it isn’t actually inked in Figure One.

Initial ink with a 0.1 multiliner SP. I actually had to replace the nib in my 0.1 after using it for about a day, but I learned my lesson! It seems I’m rather hard on all my pens and markers, which seems to be part of my style, but I don’t recommend it.

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Figure Two: Steampunk Horse Color One

Figure two.  Initial application of Copic color.  I don’t own as many greys as I would like (are you a “gray” or a “grey” person?). This will be N1 and N4, and the browns and blues are Y26 (Mustard, love it!), Yr24, E35, B04 and BG000. The peachy color is E93 (Tea Rose, another favorite).

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Figure 3: Steampunk Horse Color 2

More of the same colors, with a couple more greys, C-3 and C-5. I started using the Colorless Blender.

Added some YR12 and YR23 to the E93 try to capture that strange reddish, yellowish tinge to a donkey’s face.  Yes, I’m still working with a photo of a donkey for my horse.


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Figure 4: Steampunk Horse Ink 2

One of my favorite parts is the initial outline with a 0.8 multiliner when the drawing begins to come more to life. Also 0.3 and 0.1 for some details – and inked the pipe so now I’m stuck with it! It’s a little too low in the frame and I wish I had more space for more of the barrel of the pipe.


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Figure 5: Steampunk Horse Color 3

Additional browns added: E08 and E53. Although I always do the swirl pattern, I often add some flowers.  I decided to forego the flowers this time and see about doing only swirl patterns – the idea being that the eye piece, the goggles, the pipe and the tubing would be enough in the way of finer detail. Started adding even finer detail with the 0.05 multiliner SP.  You can see the 0.05 in the horizontal lines on the goggle lenses and on the eyepiece.

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Figure 6: Steampunk Donkey Horse Original Art

Went a little swirl-nutty.  One effect I particularly like is a colored multiliner over marker from the same color family, like on the bird’s body of the eyepiece.  Also used some sepia multiliner on the goggles. I added a little B02 (Robin’s Egg Blue) to add a little depth to the blue. Tightened up some more details, then did the swirl thing with the 0.3, 0.1 and 0.05. Sometimes in the same place, if the color effect wasn’t as dark as I wanted. And though I usually leave some light spots with no swirls, the swirl-nutty fever was on me and I swirled the whole thing up (with the minor exceptions of the goggle band and metal tubing.)

I like the effect of the subdued colors. As usual I am not sure about whether I want a background. At one point toward the end, I had actually sketched out a stripey design for the background, intending to use only black multiliner detail for the entire background, but then I decided against it. Holy cow, long post. Thank you for sticking around! What do you think, compared to my others (if you’ve seen them)?

Find Cindy on the web:
Web Site: http://www.theslumberingherd.com
Copic Color: http://www.copiccolor.com/cindyd

Share your illustrations with us on Facebook and Twitter!

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Comikaze Expo 2011

Comikaze 2011

Visit Copic Marker at Comikaze Expo in Los Angeles, November 5th & 6th! We’ll be at booth #1202, near the entrance.

To stay current on everything Copic during Comikaze, be sure to follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

See you there!

10/24/2011 11:21:17 PM | Comments (0) | Send a Message (PeaMail) | Vote for this Blog Post

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October Coloring Contest

Copic October Coloring Contest
CONTEST!
Download the blank image here and color it with Copics, adding your creative jack-o-lantern design to the center pumpkin. Submit your creation by October 31st for a chance to win a marker from your Copic Color wish list!

Don’t have a Copic Color account? Get started today! Copic Color is the place to track your marker collection online, access it from your mobile phone, share your artwork, and connect with other artists.

How Do I Enter?
- Email your creation to contest@copicmarker.com by midnight PST on Monday, October 31st.
- Please include your Copic Color user name in the email (You must be a member of www.copiccolor.com to win. Marker will be selected randomly from your wish list).

Rules
- You may submit one entry per day.
- Entries may be shared on Copic Marker web properties.*
- We’ll select our favorite (bonus points for being creative!), and announce the winner by November 2nd.
- Everyone may participate, but only residents of the United States and Canada are eligible to win.*
- If you have won a Copic coloring contest within the past 90 days, you may participate but are not eligible to win.

Good luck!

*Web properties include Copic Marker, Copic Color, the Copic Marker Facebook page, the Copic Marker Twitter page, and the Copic Marker Tumblr page.

*This contest is run by Imagination International, Inc., the distributor of Copic Markers in the United States and Canada. We are legally prohibited from sending product to other countries.

10/24/2011 8:40:16 PM | Comments (0) | Send a Message (PeaMail) | Vote for this Blog Post

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Copic Halloween Costume Contest!

Copic Halloween Costume Contest
Have a killer Halloween costume? Wanna show off your cosplay? Send us a photo and win Copic prizes!

Enter by October 31st for a chance to win 12 markers from your Copic Color wish list and an empty 36 pc wallet.

How Do I Enter?
- Email your costume photo to contest@copicmarker.com by midnight PST on Monday, October 31st.
- Please include your Copic Color user name in the email (You must be a member of www.copiccolor.com to win. Markers will be selected randomly from your wish list).

Rules
- You may submit one photo per day.
- Submitted photos may be shared on Copic Marker web properties.*
- We’ll select our favorite costume (bonus points for being colorful!), and announce the winner by November 2nd.
- Everyone may participate, but only residents of the United States and Canada are eligible to win.*

Good luck!

*Web properties include Copic Marker, Copic Color, the Copic Marker Facebook page, the Copic Marker Twitter page, and the Copic Marker Tumblr page.

*This contest is run by Imagination International, Inc., the distributor of Copic Markers in the United States and Canada. We are legally prohibited from sending product to other countries.

10/21/2011 6:31:33 PM | Comments (0) | Send a Message (PeaMail) | Vote for this Blog Post

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Artist Interview with Arturo Elena

Arturo Elena is a very talented fashion illustrator based in Zaragoza, Spain. He has collaborated with top designers and fashion magazines including Cosmopolitan Spain, Chanel Spain and Audemars Piguet. Read on to learn more about this amazing artist!

Tell us a bit about yourself!
I am Arturo Elena, a normal and down to earth person that has the amazing privilege of working within my passion, Illustration. I am completely self-taught and I always liked to draw so have been practising since I was a little boy. My mother even remembers me recreating and painting Walt Disney characters as a small child!

When I finished my studies in high school, I had to make the decision of what to do next and I decided to apply to the Design School in Barcelona. The director of the school told me that I had this gift and such a talent that the best ‘school’ for me was going to be the day by day work, developing my own style & technique, and working and following my intuition. This time is also when my drawing skills began combining with my absolute admiration for the fashion world.
Arturo Elena

When did you discover that fashion illustration was your passion?

After five years working with design teams in Barcelona and Sevilla, I realised that what I liked the most was to draw fashion that others produced rather than to produce fashion myself.

The definitive jump to illustration came when I got the request from Spanish designers, Victorio & Lucchino, to illustrate the press folder for their collection and perfume ‘Carmen’, presented in Madrid Fashion Week in 1992. When this reached the press it opened a lot of doors to collaborations with fashion magazines such as Cosmopolitan, Elle and Telva. They started to request my illustrations and I decided to dedicate my professional life to it, something that helped me to get consolidated as a fashion illustrator.

What are your biggest sources of inspiration?

Photography in general is my main source of inspiration but specially fashion photography as I look through many fashion magazines to recreate and obtain realistic effects, light, shadows, textures, the movements of the figures and perspectives in my own images. Also, I have to say that at the beginning of my career, I was strongly influenced by illustrators like René Gruau and Stefano Canulli.

What’s the most satisfying part of your job?
Without a doubt, when I present the final piece to a client and the result is better than what they were expecting, this feeling of getting what they wanted to transmit with my illustration is the most satisfying.

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What’s the most difficult thing about your job?

I work only upon request and this is something that can give me limitations. For each of my requests, I always have to consider the direction that has been stated by the client. I have to find out about each of my client’s style and philosophy. Then, depending of the purpose of their request, I try to visualise all those aspects in my mind before I put them together in the final piece and on paper.

So, for me the most difficult part is to come with the final image that will cover the client’s requirements.

Why do you prefer Copic markers for your illustrations?
Since I started to be a professional illustrator, I have tried different pens, but I use Copic for several reasons: Their huge variety in colours, quality and precision. With Copic, I can blend the colours to get the results that I’m looking for.

Do you have a favorite piece or project that you’ve created?
There are many pieces that have been very gratifying. To mention a few, the series “Heroinas” (Girls-Hero) produced for Custo Barcelona and used as pattern for some of his garments are one of my favourites, along with some of the illustrations that I produced for the spanish designer Lemoniez that were used for his catwalk invitations in Cibeles Madrid Fashion Week.

Any words of advice for aspiring fashion illustrators and designers?
I think they need to be honest with themselves, to think very well if they have the skills, vocation, perseverance and if they are ready to work very hard. They need to believe in themselves and never get down, tenacity is something very important in this profession. Nobody has ever given me anything for free, but I got advantages from all of the opportunities that I found on the way. I understand that many times, people associate the fashion industry as a cold and materialistic world, but it is a field as difficult as any other and if you want to get far you just need to work hard.

Any announcements to make – exhibitions or shows coming up?
My latest work, I just finished the sketches, is an image for an event that will take part in the city where I live, Zaragoza (Spain) to promote the products of one of the most important wine cellars in Aragon, “Viñas del Vero” (Somontano). At Christmas time, once again, I’m working for Moët Hennessy Spain (Grupo LVMH) producing their Christmas-Cards Image.

When those two pieces are finished, I need to continue with the last 6 out of 12 images that I have produced for the Swish luxury watches brand Audemars Piguet. The first 6 images were launched in an exhibition that took part in the past Cibeles Madrid Fashion Week. I can’t say anything about what is going to happen with the other 6… The brand will tell all when the project is completed as it is part of the deal and I have to keep it secret :)

There is a lot more to come, but until all of it is closed and sealed I don’t like to reveal anything…


View more of Arturo’s work at www.arturoelena.com
Follow Arturo on Facebook

Arturo Elena is represented internationally by FACTORY311
For Bookings and Inquiries, please contact arturo@factory311.com / +44 (0) 207 836 5610

Share your fashion illustration work with us on Facebook and Twitter!

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Color Spotlight: YG17

Welcome to our Color Spotlight feature! Every so often we’ll showcase a different color and give ideas of color combos that will work with it.

Marianne’s Note: When I mention a color combo whatever color I put first is the color I put down as my base color, then I blend in the second color. Also, these colors on the screen are NOT accurate and are for comparison only.

Copic Color Spotlight: YG17

YG17, Grass Green
Story behind YG17:
YG17 was introduced in the second set of 72 colors Copic produced. They already had YG13, so to add a darker tone to that family, Japan produced YG17. YG11 would not come until later. YG17 is among the new Ciao colors introduced in 2010. It is a nice, grassy green, as the name implies, and a great base for any kind of foliage. To get a darker green than YG17, you need to jump to another color family, and my favorite group to jump to for deep, rich green shadows is G28 or G29.
Available in these styles:

Copic, Sketch, Ciao, Various
Natural Blending Family:
YG11, YG13, YG17
Simple Blend:
YG13, YG17, G28
Similar Colors, other families:
G17, B16, R17, V17
Marianne’s Unusual Combos:
YG17
+ BG72, YG17 + Y28,  W5 +
YG17

Copic Color Spotlight: YG17Advanced Color Rules for YG17*:
Complimentary:
YG17, R39
Triad (simple 3 color combo): YG17, V09, E07
Tetrad (simple 4 color combo):
YG17, B39, R39, E37
Pentagram (simple 5 color combo): YG17, B66, Y28, E09, V09
High Contrast:
YG17, G99, C9, 100, R89
Compound:
YG17, G16, C8, V06, RV19, RV99

*Advanced color rules are generated by Adobe Illustrator CS3 based on the digital representation of the Copic Color Spectrum set into a special color wheel. I generate these as suggestions for color combos to try when you are looking for a nice change, or you have a paper that matches this particular color and you want help picking other unusual colors to go with it.

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The Project I made for YG17: Blue Butterfly
This drawing was inspired heavily by the beautiful combination of the YG17, B66, and Y28 from the pentagram color swatches. I would never consider using those three colors together, but I loved how they looked in a row, so I decided to try them. In thinking of intense blue images, I kept thinking of blue butterflies, so a butterfly and leaves were a natural choice. I wanted to keep this illustration light and different from my usual work. You can see the strong use of the B66, YG17, and Y28 as a background color. I drew light sketches in pencil, then colored the image with B29, B66, E09, E37, RV99, YG11, YG17, G16, G99, Y28, C9, V06, V09. I dripped on a lot of Colorless Blender, and finished the image with Opaque White. Copic Color Spotlight: YG17

10/19/2011 10:47:45 PM | Comments (0) | Send a Message (PeaMail) | Vote for this Blog Post

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Guest Tutorial: Lights and Shadows by Brandi York

This week’s guest tutorial is by Brandi York. From February 2003 to July 2004, Brandi was a portrait and caricature artist for Rubio Arts at Disneyland.  In October of 2004 she began working for Trader Joe’s in Irvine, CA doing chalk boards for store displays, oil and acrylic paintings and any other odds and ends thrown her way.  In 2006 she and her husband moved to Oregon, where she continues working for Trader Joe’s while expanding her art career.  Her art has been seen at conventions around the country as well as local art shows.

For this tutorial, I’m going to focus on achieving the lights and shadows on the face. I like to keep a black and white print out of the photo I’m doing along with the full color version. I find this helps to push the values as well as the color.

All of the markers used are Copic Sketch, brush tip side.

Starting with a R000, I lay in the general tones of the skin, followed by E00 to beef up the shadows a little:

Copic Tutorial - Lights and Shadows by Brandi York

Using an E02, I deepen up the shadows a bit more before breaking out the BV31, adding into the shadows of the face. I go back over the BV31 with the R000 and E00 to warm the shadows back up a bit. Using the side of the brush tip, I pull the BV31 across the cheek, letting the shadow naturally fade out, instead of it having a hard edge:

Copic Tutorial - Lights and Shadows by Brandi York
Pulling out the E34 and E35, I start to hit the really deep reddish-brown shadows of the skin. I use the R000 to smooth out the colors, creating a softer transition, instead of the 0 Colorless Blender, which often lightens the area you’re blending (although that can often be useful, it’s not the look I’m going for here.) Next, I use the BV23 and BV25 to deepen the shadows of the neck, lips, eyes and nose, again feathering them out with the lighter colors I’ve been using:

Copic Tutorial - Lights and Shadows by Brandi York
I go over the face again with the E00, knocking down some of the redness from the R000, adding a touch of R20 into the cheeks and nose.

I finish out the eyes with a stroke of BV25 and E29 around the lashes and a dot for the pupils, then E29 for the darker portion of the eyes. I use the 0 Colorless Blender and just hold it down for a moment where the lightest part of the iris (not the highlight itself) is to get the two colors to blend, giving the look of the light reflected in the iris.

Using R59 for the deepest part of the lips and R46 for the lighter, I finish out the lips, touching the highlight with R20, then the 0 Colorless Blender. I use a little YR82 and E31 to yellow down the skin a little, taking out some of the red:

Copic Tutorial - Lights and Shadows by Brandi York
Much of the rest of the face (and whole piece) is played with, pushing a little here and there with the markers, until I find the balance I like. Experiment and have fun! That’s what it’s all about!

Copic Tutorial: Lights and Shadows by Brandi York

All colors used to complete the piece: 0, R000, R20, R46, R59, YR82, E000, E00, E02, E29, E31, E34, E35, E49, E50, BV23, BV25, BV31

Share your illustrations with us on Facebook and Twitter!

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Carrying Case Contest Winners

Thank you to everyone who entered our Carrying Case Contest! We asked you to creatively show us why your Copics need a new home. We received 79 entries, and there were so many funny and creative photos. It was hard to choose! Below are the winners for this contest.

WINNERS: Please email your address to kacy@copicmarker.com

1st place will receive the new Copic Carrying Case!
2nd and 3rd place will receive Copic goodie bags and “I <3 Copic” bumper stickers.

1st Place: Eli Atterbury will no longer have to fashion a harness on her dog to transport her Copics ;)

Copic Carrying Case ContestCopic Carrying Case Contest

2nd Place: Bianca Wegar

Copic Carrying Case Contest
3rd Place: Karen E Haley

Copic Carrying Case Contest
You can view the full album of entries on our Facebook page.

Thanks again to everyone who entered, stay tuned for more contests!

10/17/2011 10:20:55 PM | Comments (0) | Send a Message (PeaMail) | Vote for this Blog Post

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Guest Tutorial: Sketching From Life by Jackson Root

This week’s guest tutorial is by Jackson Root, a talented illustrator in Southern California. Enjoy!

Sketching Tonally and Quickly

I often find that the task of starting a sketch can be a little daunting. A blank white page can sometimes be a very intimidating thing. In my experience, the best practice in learning how to draw is to draw from observation, that is, to draw anything and everything around you. In this tutorial, I will describe two ways in which I like to use Copic Markers to sketch from life. First, I will describe how to gradually build up tones like a watercolor painting, and second, a quick-sketch method for getting a drawing done fast. I usually use brush end of the Copic Sketch or Ciao, and the chisel when I am looking for a sharp edge, such as a shaded cheek bone or table edge.


Sketching Tonally

I like to start a sketch with a very light tone marker, for example W3 (Warm Gray 3), E31 (Brick Beige) or R20 (Blush) and build up the tones with a medium-dark tone, such as W5 (Warm Gray 5), E33 (Sand) or R02 (Flesh). I think that it is important to begin a sketch very loosely, try and let your eyes do the drawing, and don’t overthink it!
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At this point, I like to ask myself, “what is the absolute darkest thing that I can find in this object?”, be it the inner nostrils in a portrait drawing, or the darkest part of a shadow just below a flower vase. I will also make a note of the brightest areas in the image by using my light sketching tone to surround the highlight, as a way of protecting it from being colored over. It is important to establish these two extremes, as they will give your drawing the illusion of depth as if they occupy real space.


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Here I have used a dark tone to pick out the darkest areas in the drawing as a way of establishing my range from brightest (the white of the paper) to darkest. Depending on the drawing, I like to use E77 (Maroon), E87 (Fig), W9 (Warm Gray 9) and often 110 (Special Black). Try not to use too much of this darkest tone and allow it to be the one dark shade that can’t be beat by any other tone. Here I’ve used R20 (Flesh) as my light sketching tone, E33 (Sand) as my middle tone and E87 (Fig) to pick out the darkest areas.

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Now that I have the lightest area (white paper without any color) and the darkest area (the darkest tone) any colors that I add in between will make up the mid-tones that will describe the subtle variations of tone and color throughout the rest of the drawing.

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In this drawing, I found the lightest areas to be light bouncing off the hair, tip of the nose, forehead and cheek (I surrounded these areas with W3 Warm Gray 3). The darkest tones I found to be the inner nostril, inner eye socket and eyelashes, and parts of the hair (110 Special Black). Starting with W5 (Warm Gray 5), I then “roughed in” the darker areas that are not being directly hit with light, which in this drawing, was almost the entire side of his face!



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Now, because I have already established the “darkest darks”, I can be sure that any markers lighter than my darkest tone won’t destroy my contrast hierarchy, and with a little practice, you can train your eye to look for those “tonal landmarks” and in no time, your drawings will read spatially and volumetrically.

The Quick-Sketch Method

Sometimes, you simply don’t have the time to make a complete tonal rendering of your subject at hand, be it your best friend or your dog, if they won’t sit still, you’ll be hard-pressed to make a complete drawing!

I like to start with a very light tone, similar to beginning a full tonal drawing, typically W3 (Warm Gray 3), E11 (Brick Beige) or R20 (Blush), in order to make a quick and rough sketch. At this point, I’m not too concerned with getting the lines exactly where they should be, but rather to give me a real sense at how my drawing will sit on the paper. Keep it loose and try to capture the “energy” of your subject.

Once I have a rough sketch done in a very light tone marker, I use my Multiliner SP BS (Brush Small) to clean up my lines, and define the drawing that is hidden in my “rough sketch”. Don’t worry about staying inside or following the lines of the earlier sketch, consider yourself to be like Michelangelo, chipping away the paper to reveal the inner drawing.

Remember to keep the rough sketch loose and allow yourself to really feel out the lines of the detailed drawing. Try to keep your sketches under ten minutes and move on to the next subject!

Often I will use the Multiliner BM (Brush Medium) or 110 (Special Black) to “rough out” the background or quickly draw shapes in the background. It’s important not to add too much detail in the background that it takes away from the subject of your drawing, but just enough to accentuate the focus of the drawing.

Many of your best models are right in front of you. Draw your friends, draw your parents, draw your cat, draw your computer! You can never draw too much.




Find Jackson on the web:
Web Site: http://www.jacksonroot.com
Copic Color: http://www.copiccolor.com/Jackson

Jackson will be leading a demonstration/tutorial on sketching from life next month. If you’re in Southern California, check it out and meet the artist in person!

November 12th, 2011 10am-1pm
Catalyst Art Studio
6630 Westminster Blvd
Westminster, CA 92683
For more information, visit http://www.ArtSupplyWarehouse.com/Catalyst

Share your sketching from life illustrations with us on Facebook and Twitter!

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Win a Copic Carrying Case!

Copic Carrying Case

How would you like to WIN our new Copic Carrying Case?

It’s easy! Post a photo on our Facebook wall creatively showing why your markers need a new home. Whoever posts our favorite photo, based on creativity and originality, will win a new case!

Enter by midnight PST on Sunday, October 16th. We’ll announce a winner on Monday, October 17th.

Good luck!

*Contest is open to residents of the United States and Canada only.

10/10/2011 8:30:47 PM | Comments (0) | Send a Message (PeaMail) | Vote for this Blog Post

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Guest Tutorial: Halloween Project by Sharon Harnist

Happy October! We have some great tutorials to share with you this month, and we’re pleased to kick things off with a fun Halloween project for paper crafters by the lovely Sharon Harnist. Enjoy!

Copic Halloween Project
by Sharon Harnist
Blog: www.PaperFections.com
Copic Color Gallery: http://www.copiccolor.com/SharonHarnist

Recycle frappuccino bottles and carton into fun Halloween treat containers:

Copic Halloween Project by Sharon Harnist

Instructions:

1. Cover recycled frappuccino carton with patterned papers: Lay each side of carton on patterned paper and trace with a pencil. Cut and adhere to carton using X-Press It Double-Sided High Tack Tape .

TIP:
To achieve seamless seams, color the corners of the carton with coordinating Copic marker color. This way, if seams don’t match up perfectly, they will be unnoticeable:

Copic Halloween Project by Sharon Harnist

2. Stamp witch image and sentiment onto X-Press It Blending Card with Tuxedo Black Ink; color with Copic Sketch Markers (colors listed in supplies below).

Copic Halloween Project by Sharon Harnist

3. Die cut witch image and while cardstock is still in the die, airbrush T2 background.

4. Stamp and color additional hat, hand trim and pop up on foam tape for added dimension.

TIP : Color edges of cut out images with coordinating Copic color, to finish them nicely and give a more realistic look.

Copic Halloween Project by Sharon Harnist

5. Die cut green cardstock frame, run through Xyron machine and cover with green glitter; adhere glittered frame over witch image. Attach framed witch to carton with foam tape.

Copic Halloween Project by Sharon Harnist
6. Stamp “Happy Halloween” sentiment onto X-Press It Blending Card and die cut with Classic Circle Nestabilities die; while cardstock is still in die, airbrush with YR16. Layer sentiment onto another circle die cut from black cardstock; attach to frappuccino carton with foam tape.

Copic Halloween Project by Sharon Harnist
7. Repeat step 6 with smaller “Trick or Treat” sentiment and attach to lid of frappuccino bottle.

Copic Halloween Project by Sharon Harnist

8. Wrap X-Press It Double-Sided High Tack Tape around edge of frappuccino lid and cover with green glitter.

Copic Halloween Project by Sharon Harnist

9. Fill bottles with candies, for a special Halloween treat container!

Supplies:
Copic Sketch Markers:
V15, V17, YG13, YG25-(dress); T1, T3, T5, T7-(hat & boots); E33, E57, Y21-(hair); E000, E11-(skin); B45-(eyes); T2-(airbrushed background)
Copic Products: X-Press It Blending Card, ABS-1 & Double-Sided High Tack Tape
Stamps: Gina K Designs-
Feel The Magic by Alicia Krupksy
Paper: Gina K Designs Heavy Base Weight Cardstock-Creme de Menthe & Black Onyx;  Authentique 6×6 patterned paper pad-Glowing
Ink: Tsukineko Memento Tuxedo Black
Dies:
Spellbinders Petite Scalloped Ovals & Classic Circle Nestabilities, Twisted Metal Tags & Accents; Grand Calibur die cutting machine
Accessories: Recycled frappuccino bottles & carton/holder, Xyron, Glitter Ritz Opaque Micro Fine Glitter-Chartreuse, foam tape

Share your Halloween projects with us on Facebook and Twitter!

10/5/2011 4:50:50 PM | Comments (0) | Send a Message (PeaMail) | Vote for this Blog Post

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Copic Carrying Case

Copic Carrying Case

Available for the first time, Copic now offers a portable case big enough to hold the entire Copic color spectrum. Six removable carry cups fit in the case’s hard shell exterior, holding up to 380 Sketch markers. The top zipper closure and shoulder strap make transporting your Copic collection a breeze. Just in time for the holidays, this case is the perfect gift for the Copic lover who has everything.

Would you like to WIN a case?

Copic Marker is proud to partner with Splitcoaststampers the entire month of October for their annual Hope You Can Cling To campaign for breast cancer awareness.

Splitcoast is hosting daily challenges through the entire month of October, and asking members of the paper crafting community to create cards in support of cancer patients and their families and mail them to national partner MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, TX. Copic Marker is pleased to offer FOUR of these great new Copic Coloring Cases as prizes for four lucky participants in the Hope You Can Cling To campaign. It’s a campaign of the sweetest type – you have the opportunity to color, spread a little hope with your handcrafted cards and be eligible to win!

You can find general information for the Hope You Can Cling To campaign, including information on how to play and a handy tracking sheet to keep track of your entries, here. You can find a master list of the challenges presented thus far right here. It’s updated daily for new inspiration, and there are a variety of themes, so participation easy. And, just in case you aren’t familiar with Splitcoast, it’s a free papercrafting community where thousands of card ideas and tutorials are shared in the galleries and their resource archives. It’s a fun place to be. You can find the details here. You can sign up for your free account and start sharing here.

Splitcoaststampers will announce the four lucky Copic Coloring Case winners the second week of November! Good luck!

10/4/2011 6:28:20 PM | Comments (0) | Send a Message (PeaMail) | Vote for this Blog Post

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Copic Catalog Contest

Copic Catalog Contest

One lucky winner will have their work featured in our 2012 product catalog, which is distributed throughout the U.S. and Canada! Winner will also receive markers from their Copic Color wish list.

Ready to enter? Add your original Copic artwork to your Copic Color gallery, and fill out the entry form HERE by October 31st.

We’ll choose our 10 favorite entries, and post them for the public to vote on in early November. You may enter more than once.

Good luck!

*Contest is open to residents of the United States and Canada only.

10/3/2011 8:11:18 PM | Comments (0) | Send a Message (PeaMail) | Vote for this Blog Post

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Artist Interview with Kareena Zerefos

Kareena Zerefos is an amazing London-based illustrator. She studied at the College of Fine Arts UNSW before going on to become a successful artist and designer. Read on to learn more, and be sure to check out her web site to see more work.

When did you begin creating art?
Back in pre-school, sticking coloured macaroni to paper plates and drawing with giant crayons… it’s just something I’ve always had to do.

What are your biggest sources of inspiration?
A lot of my work has been inspired by a yearning to escape to a world of make-believe, a place of nostalgia but also isolation. Recently I’ve been fascinated by traveling menageries, illusion and metamorphosis in Greek mythology.

How do you describe your work?
Bittersweet, subtle and delicately detailed illustrative work.

Has your illustration process changed over time?
There has certainly been an evolution in my process. I started out as a graphic designer, so initially this influenced my illustrative techniques, being quite reliant on layering with Photoshop and Illustrator. However, I became frustrated with the intangibility of computer- based work and started experimenting with the materials I had around me – scraps of water colour paper, pencils, gouache, letraset and even tea. I’ve now developed a more particular process, mostly working with graphite, Copic markers and ink on print making papers.

Why did you choose Copic markers for your illustrations?
I was introduced to Copic markers back when I was studying design at university for neatly rendering technical drawings, but it was just over a year or so ago that I started incorporating them into my illustrations, initially as a replacement for gouache and water colours. I’ve found them to be perfect for soft, muted tones, particularly skin tones and eye colours, and recently I’ve been using brighter tones for detailed colouring in feathers. I work over the top of the Copic marker layer with black ink and graphite to bring in further definition.

What are you working on right now?
I’ve just finished working on some pieces to exhibit, and now I’m back to commissioned work- putting together new prints for Element Eden, EP artwork for Australian musician Packwood and an editorial piece for Yen magazine. I’m also getting started on a collaboration with paper- engineer (and fellow Papered Parlour artist) Helen Friel.

Any exhibitions or shows coming up?
Currently I have a solo exhibition up and running at Retrospect Gallery in Broadbeach (Gold Coast, Australia), and I’m exhibiting along side Vitor Dos Santos at Libby Edwards Galleries in Melbourne (Australia), opening 13th October. We’re also having an open studio weekend here at The Papered Parlour in London on the 22nd and 23rd October.

Any words of advice for new artists?
Just keep doing what you love.

View more of Kareena’s work at http://www.kareenazerefos.com/

Share your illustration work with us on Facebook and Twitter!

10/3/2011 3:00:58 PM | Comments (0) | Send a Message (PeaMail) | Vote for this Blog Post

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