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6 Rocketeer Renderings by Eric Canete

Six stunning versions of the Rocketeer rendered by Copic master Eric Canete.






From his Essential Sequential bio:

Eric is an illustrator and designer working in the animation and comic book industries.  He was born in the Philippines and moved to the United States when he was 12 years old. His professional career got a very early start when at the age of 17 he assisted as a background designer and storyboard artist on several animated shows for television such as X-Men and Exo-Squad, for which he was uncredited. He later moved his focus to what he has referred to as his ‘true calling’ – comic books. His experience in storyboarding for animation greatly benefited his comic book storytelling work, for which he has been hailed by his contemporaries. He has worked for every major comic book company in the United States including Marvel and DC Comics.

Find Eric on the web:
Twitter
DeviantArt
Essential Sequential
Blog

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Creating Paper Flowers: Susan Tierney Cockburn’s Winter CHA Workshop

Paper Bouquet by Susan Tierney CockburnSusan Tierney Cockburn, author of Paper Bouquet: Using Paper Punches to Create Beautiful Flowers, will be demonstrating her technique at Winter CHA in Anaheim.

In Susan’s “Presentation is Everything!” workshop, students will learn how to create realistic paper flowers using Copic markers and Sizzix die-cutting and embossing tools.

Susan Tierney Cockburn creates paper flowers with Copic markers

Susan Tierney Cockburn

Susan Tierney Cockburn creates paper flowers with Copic markers

Susan uses the Copic airbrush system to color paper flowers.

Susan Tierney Cockburn creates paper flowers with Copic markers

The finished product!

Susan’s Winter CHA workshop will take place Sunday, January 13, 2013 from 2-4pm.

11/29/2012 2:32:22 PM | Comments (0) | Send a Message (PeaMail) | Vote for this Blog Post

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Blog Post

Basic Lighting with Copic Markers

Comics creator Jayleen Weaver (Marker Guru) runs Gurukitty Studios with her sister. They’re self-described as the craziest little comics and animation studio to ever try to hash out a living. Read on for her tips on lighting faces:

Hello! I’m going to talk a little bit about lighting a subject and executing that lighting on a face with Copic markers.

The first thing to always remember is to not let your task overwhelm you. The second thing is to use a reference.

I always make sure if I have a specific lighting in mind I take a couple reference photos and make sure to study the way the shadows are cast and the colours of the shadows and light.

Basic Lighting with Copic Markers by Jayleen Weaver

See how his shadows are red? we were holding a red piece of paper next to him. That’s called reflected light (another time perhaps…)

There are a millions way that a character can be lit, but I’ll go over just a couple. Generally speaking, a shadow is formed where there is an absence of light. Often this is caused by something blocking the light and casting a shadow. Because the light is being blocked, the cast shadow will be the opposite colour of the colour of the light. (because the shadow will not contain that colour). In all my examples I am using a warm light source (yellow) so my cast shadows are going to be violet (BV31 and BV25).

Frontal Lighting
This is when a character is lit evenly from the front:

Basic Lighting with Copic Markers by Jayleen WeaverIn a case like this, the shadows are going to be quite subtle and light. Only the areas that stick out the most would cast a shadow. A little bit under the nose, under the bottom lip, and depending on the facial structure, a few other areas.

This is a good lighting for some neutral time situations where you don’t want heavy shadows. Here is an example:

Basic Lighting with Copic Markers by Jayleen Weaver

In this case I was portraying an overcast day in fall. The lighting is coming from pretty much everywhere as the cloud cover diffuses the light from the sun.

3/4 Lighting
Sometimes called Renaissance lighting, this is where the light is coming from side and the front. It is a very common type of lighting especially for portraits:

Basic Lighting with Copic Markers by Jayleen Weaver

This is where the nose casts a shadow that connects to the shadow on the far side of the face and creates the triangle of light on the far cheek. It’s one of the most common used in anime as well.

Back Lighting
Back lighting occurs when an object is in front of the light source so that the front of it is in shadow, and the light creates a rim effect around it:

Basic Lighting with Copic Markers by Jayleen Weaver

The shadows are much deeper and only some small areas will get some light:

Basic Lighting with Copic Markers by Jayleen Weaver

Light From Below
Lighting from below can occur with the light source are held below an object. Sometimes this can be a secondary light source:

Basic Lighting with Copic Markers by Jayleen Weaver

This lighting can create some cool dramatic effects:

Basic Lighting with Copic Markers by Jayleen Weaver

Next, I will walk through the colouring of an image with 3/4 light source.

Colours used: G20, E02, E00. BV31, BV23, E04, E07

Step 1: I inked my line drawing on X-Press it Blending Card with Copic Multiliner SPs:

Basic Lighting with Copic Markers by Jayleen Weaver
Step 2: I start with a layer of G20:

Basic Lighting with Copic Markers by Jayleen Weaver

Step 3: I add in some E02 on some of the light points and around the eyes (tender skin zones where the blood is closer to the surface. Be careful! You CAN over do this.):

Basic Lighting with Copic Markers by Jayleen Weaver
Step 4: 
I go over it with a layer of E00:

Basic Lighting with Copic Markers by Jayleen Weaver 
Step 5: 
Blend with E00:

Basic Lighting with Copic Markers by Jayleen Weaver
Step 6: 
Start with Shadows. BV31 is my favourite. Think about anywhere the light will not be. The far side of the face, the nose, in the hollows of his eyes, under his lip, under his nose. This is where your reference is essential. Don’t forget to leave some highlighted areas on the shadowed side. This will create the depth and life of your image:

Basic Lighting with Copic Markers by Jayleen Weaver
Step 7: Blend with E00. Then I start to deepen the shadows with some touches of BV23. You can cheat the lighting a little bit to make your image more appealing. Don’t forget his lovely hair:

Basic Lighting with Copic Markers by Jayleen Weaver
Step 7: I add some E04 to his hair, and blend some more with E00:

Basic Lighting with Copic Markers by Jayleen Weaver
Step 8: E07 to finish his hair, and colouring in his eyes:

Basic Lighting with Copic Markers by Jayleen Weaver

Then done! Here he is in all his glory:

Basic Lighting with Copic Markers by Jayleen Weaver
I hope this was helpful to someone out there!

Find Jayleen on the web:
Guru Kitty
Marker Guru
Facebook
Twitter

11/27/2012 12:37:41 PM | Comments (0) | Send a Message (PeaMail) | Vote for this Blog Post

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Blog Post

Gift Giving Gets Creative w/ FastCompany

What an incredible shot of Copic markers (paired with sweet Reebok pumps) in this holiday gift guide for creatives, by creatives over on the FastCompany site.

Thanks to Polyvore CEO Jess Lee for thinking of us:

The Gift: Copic Sketch 72pc a Set

By Copic
Wanted by: Jess Lee
“I’ve been wanting to learn how to use color markers. Copic is the brand that professional Japanese manga artists use. My dream is to one day draw a graphic novel.” ($500,copicmarker.com)

copic and reebok pumps gifts

Be sure to see all the great gift ideas over on the FastCompany post.

Thinking about giving the gift of Copic this year? Here are a few sets to check out:
• Copic 72 pc A Set - mentioned above, great range of colors
25th Anniversary 36 pc Set – limited edition, special nib combination, black barrels
Black Ink Pro 10 pc Wallet – great inking kit for comics, manga, tattoo artists
Cool Gray 12 pc Set - great for sketching, ideal for fine artists or beginners
Ciao Manga Pastel 8 pc Set - very economical, great for manga enthusiasts

 

11/26/2012 2:45:49 PM | Comments (0) | Send a Message (PeaMail) | Vote for this Blog Post

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Blog Post

How to Color InuYasha with Copic Markers

Evan Burse, host of Cartoon Block, walks us through the coloring of an InuYasha illustration with Copic Sketch markers:

Be sure to watch the whole video to learn how to win great Copic prizes! Your entry must be posted in this video’s YouTube comments, comments on this blog post do not qualify.

11/20/2012 11:07:50 AM | Comments (0) | Send a Message (PeaMail) | Vote for this Blog Post

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Blog Post

Introducing the Copic 2013 Color & Ink Workshop

Copic Color & Ink Workshop

Join our regional instructors for TWO consecutive, fun-filled days of coloring, creating and getting inky! Expand your coloring skills, experiment with unique surfaces, learn new inking techniques and advance your airbrushing aptitude in this totally hands-on workshop, January 10-11 in Anaheim, CA.

We will be including the following 4 classes during this two day event:

  • Coloring Ethnic Skin Tones and Various Hair Styles
  • Oodles of Doodles and Backgrounds
  • Airbrushing Made Easy
  • So Many Surfaces

PREREQUISITE: Standard Certification

An optional evening round-table discussion/critique session is also being offered for an additional fee.

Learn More and Apply!

11/14/2012 12:40:58 PM | Comments (0) | Send a Message (PeaMail) | Vote for this Blog Post

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Blog Post

Mixed Media: Watercolor and Copic Markers

This week, illustrator Brandi York shares her techniques for creating a mixed media piece with watercolors and Copic markers

I’ve been enthralled with much of Japanese culture for a long time. Geishas have always been a fascination, so I decided for this mixed-media tutorial, a lovely geisha in pink would be my subject.

For this, I’m using Strathmore Watercolor paper. You don’t need to have expensive paints for this, since the majority of what we’ll be seeing in the end will actually be Copic markers, but it will have a watercolor appearance. The key to this is to run some water over your watercolors if you’re using dried pans, letting the water soak in for a good 10 minutes before you actually start painting.

I start with a very light pencil drawing on watercolor paper. I use colorless masking fluid on spots that I want to keep white or very light in the final piece amid a darker area (like the center of the flowers in her hair or the flowers hanging down the side of her face). Using clear water, I do a wash in just the area I want to work on, in this case the hair. Let the water soak into the paper for a moment before adding the paint. I come in with a light purple-black and float it into the water, letting it move and shift as it wants to. I’m not trying for very tight control at this point – that will just frustrate me and take all the fun out of this. Let the watercolor do its thing and make for finer detailing with the Copics later.

Watercolor and Copic Markers by Brandi York

Before it’s fully dry, I’ll come back in with a little darker mix of the purple-black, deepening the darker areas of the hair. Now I’ll move to the kimono and give it the same treatment, bouncing around while I allow each piece to dry. Don’t like how a particular area is going? Dab it with a dry paper towel. Depending on the color, it likely won’t remove it completely, but it will certainly lighten the color and allow it to dry more quickly.

Watercolor and Copic Markers by Brandi York
When I approach the face with watercolor, I am very careful to keep it light with just a touch of purple and pink near the chin (reflecting the color of the kimono). Just before it dries, I come in with a wet brush to soften the edges further and lighten it just a bit more. I add color to the flowers, the neck of the kimono under the top and the background, all using the same method.

Watercolor and Copic Markers by Brandi York
Once everything is dry, I break out my Copics.  I’m using the Sketch, using the brush side. I start detailing the flowers with R22, R24, BV23 and BV25 with a bit of Y00 and Y26 for the flowers. The fun part of this is that much of the base has already been laid for you with the watercolor. Now you can come in and start layering color in, detailing it up without the use of a tiny brush. I also use BV23, BV25 and BV29 to add some detail into her hair. Mostly quick little stokes here, just trying to layer up and create a bit more depth with the markers.

I move on to the face, adjusting the hairline with BV29 and 110 Special Black. BV000, BV20 and V95 serve for my first pass of the face, with just a little bit of R20 for the color to the lips and hint of color at her eyes. Again, here, I’m just using light strokes, flicking my wrist to let the color trail off, using the Colorless Blender to soften the edges of the color on her face. I want the effect to be very soft, as though I was still using watercolor. By staying very light, I am ensuring that I’m not going overboard too quickly, keeping that soft transparency.

In places I want to make sure edges blend out, I use the Colorless Blender -first- then lay down the color. The edges soften far more this way, giving me the very soft edge I want.

Watercolor and Copic Markers by Brandi York
I continue layering color on her face, adding a little R20 to create a reflected light from the kimono on her chin, as well as continuing to relayer BV000 and BV20. I see that I’ve made a bit of a mistake on her nose, so I come in with the Colorless Blender and keep layering it until the color lightens to almost gone. The blender is basically pushing the color through the backside of the paper (if I flip it over, I can see the color starting to come through). I wait until the area is completely dry and then I’ll make my corrections.  Something to be aware of – when making corrections like this, there will often be an edge where the color will collect, leaving a ring around the area. A way to help avoid this is to feather out the strokes from this corrected area, leaving it so that the ink is not so concentrated. Since we have a watercolor effect going here, it’s not going to be as noticeable as something that is more tightly rendered.

Watercolor and Copic Markers by Brandi York

I finish out the kimono the same way I had the face and hair, including the use of B14 to pull some of the blue tones of the background forward. I dot it around the piece to help tie it all together. At the very end, I add a little of Sakura Gelly Roll in white, detailing up a few bits of the kimono.

Watercolor and Copic Markers by Brandi York

I hope this inspires you to try something new and give mixing medias a whirl. The versatility of Copic markers makes it so easy to try different things with amazing results!

Colors Used: Y00, Y26, B14, BV000, BV20, BV23, BV25, BV29, V95, R20, R22, R24, R29, 110 Special Black and Colorless Blender with Sakura Gelly Roll pen over watercolors.

See more of Brandi’s illustrations on Copic Color, and add your own work while you’re there!

11/13/2012 8:30:43 AM | Comments (0) | Send a Message (PeaMail) | Vote for this Blog Post

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Blog Post

Copic Classroom Visits

Copics in the Classroom
Copics are coming to classrooms! From Fall 2012 through Fall 2013, Copic Sketch marker and Multiliner samples (one of each) are given to every student at Strathmore class visits, taking place at colleges and universities nationwide.

Each month, one lucky Strathmore class visit attendee also wins a 72 piece Copic Market set! Congratulations to our September and October winners, Nusayba A. of the University of Minnesota and Catherine Otto of the Fashion Institute of Technology.

All 2012 Strathmore visits have passed, but keep an eye on our event calendar for 2013 visit announcements.

If you are a college or university-level art instructor and would like our staff to visit, please invite us to your classroom!

11/9/2012 11:42:17 AM | Comments (0) | Send a Message (PeaMail) | Vote for this Blog Post

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Coloring Red Poinsettias with Copic Markers

Copic Design Team member Sharon Harnist is back this week to share some tips for coloring with red Copic markers. Enjoy!

It’s the beginning of the winter holiday season, which usually brings about a lot of iconic red images to color, so today I’ll be giving you a few pointers on how to color reds with your Copic markers. Since they are so highly pigmented, you may experience a little difficulty in coloring and/or blending reds.

Red Poinsettia Copic Tutorial by Sharon Harnist

Before I get started on my tutorial, I wanted to share with you a few tips from some of the other Copic instruction and design team members:

Debbie Olson (U.S. North Central & Upper Midwest Papercrafting & Fine Arts Instructor):
Use less ink, try a more absorbent surface/paper, stay back from the edges of stamped lines/drawing/other colors. Use feathering strokes instead of saturating in circles.

Michele Boyer (U.S. Design Team Member):
Color surrounding areas first, even the background, leaving the reds for last.

Bianca Mandity (U.S. Midwest Fine Arts Instructor):
I often do the darkest shading in a brown instead of red since they bleed less and I have more control over them. As long as you pick a shade that works with the red it will look fine. I’ve done that with purples too.

Colleen Schaan (Copic Education Director & U.S. East Coast Papercrafting & Fine Arts Instructor):
1. Have absorbent paper underneath (paper toweling).
2. Try working from darkest colors to light (this is not normally suggested, but it doesn’t saturate the paper as much; although this may make the colors a little more difficult to blend).
3. Use less ink . . . work with a flicking motion instead of coloring in circles.
4. Leave highlight areas white until the very end (gives the ink somewhere to go).
5. Stay away from the edges of your stamped or drawn image.
6. DON’T use the colorless blender!
7. Color all reds first – if the other areas are wet from being colored, the reds may tend to “bleed” into those areas.
8. Have some fun when shading reds . . . try using complimentary colors of green or blue, or use RV or E color families.

Thanks so much for sharing, ladies!

As you see by all of the individual preferences above, just try experimenting to find out what works best with your personal combination of paper, ink and environmental conditions. What works well for one person may not work the same for another, simply due to environmental conditions (more humidity vs. dryer weather, etc.).

Red Poinsettia Copic Tutorial by Sharon Harnist

All that being said, here are my personal preferences:

1. I usually color the reds in my images first, so that if some bleeding/wicking of the color occurs, it can be corrected a little easier.

2. I always color with a pad of paper underneath, to help absorb any extra color soak/bleed through to the back of the paper.

3. I use feather strokes, instead of blending in circles, to help avoid over-saturating the paper. If the paper becomes over-saturated, the color won’t have anywhere to go and it will just build up on top of your paper, leaving a glop of unblended color.

4. Don’t color all the way to the edge of the image at first, to see how the paper I’m using reacts.

5. I usually stick to the basic Copic blending suggestions of coloring from lightest color to darkest and prefer using X-Press It Blending Card – I think this cardstock really helps to make blending reds easier.

I started by base coating the entire poinsettia in this Memory Box Believe Poinsettia Collage stamp with R20:

Red Poinsettia Copic Tutorial by Sharon Harnist

Next, I shaded with R22, leaving some areas of the lighter R20 as a highlight and using light feathering strokes:

Red Poinsettia Copic Tutorial by Sharon Harnist

Then I went back with my lighter R20 to blend:

Red Poinsettia Copic Tutorial by Sharon Harnist

Next, I added in some darker R24 shading to some of the lower petals (those petals more towards the back of the flower), leaving the smaller petals in the center (which would be closer to you) the lightest:

 You can also use your lighter R20 marker to pick up some color from your darker R22 marker and use that to help blend the edges of the lighter colors into the R24:

Red Poinsettia Copic Tutorial by Sharon Harnist

Next, I used R22 to pull some of the R29 color from the darkest areas, to blend out onto the previous R24.

Red Poinsettia Copic Tutorial by Sharon Harnist

Notice at this point, the back of my paper is still not very saturated (not much is bleeding through to the back of the paper) because I’m using those softer, lighter feather strokes:

Red Poinsettia Copic Tutorial by Sharon Harnist

To finish the poinsettia, I used R39 (because it has a complimentary purple undertone) for my darkest shading:

Red Poinsettia Copic Tutorial by Sharon Harnist

To finish the flower, I base coated the leaves with YG91 and did my mid-tone shading with YG93:

Red Poinsettia Copic Tutorial by Sharon Harnist

YG95 finishes the darkest shading for the leaves:

Red Poinsettia Copic Tutorial by Sharon Harnist

Here’s my project with the flower coloring finished:

Red Poinsettia Copic Tutorial by Sharon Harnist

But the entire project isn’t finished yet… I’ll be back next month to show you how I finished it with some other fantastic Copic products! ~ Sharon

Products Used:
Copic Markers
: R20, R22, R24, R29, R39, YG91, YG93, YG95, YR21
Cardstock: X-Press It Blending Card; Memory Box Dill Notecard
Stamp: Memory Box Believe Poinsettia Collage
Ink: Memento Tuxedo Black

For more tips, tutorials and samples, visit Sharon’s blog, PaperFections, or follow her on Facebook or Twitter.

11/6/2012 11:54:26 AM | Comments (0) | Send a Message (PeaMail) | Vote for this Blog Post

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2013 Copic Cover Contest – Theme: Pattern

2013 Copic Cover Contest - Enter by December 2nd!

Enter your original Copic artwork for a chance to be featured on the cover of our 2013 Sets and Kits Guide! The winner will also receive $300 cash, a limited edition 25th Anniversary Set and two Various Ink refills of their choice.

The contest theme is “Pattern.” Think you have what it takes? Enter below by December 2nd. Send us your original (new or preexisting), unpublished in print, Copic-created artwork to win!

PRIZES
1st Place:
- Artwork featured on the cover of the 2013 Copic Sets and Kits Guide, distributed throughout the United States and Canada.
- $300, a 25th Anniversary Set, and two Various Ink refills (winner selects colors)

2nd and 3rd Place:
- 2012 New Colors: Sketch EX-6 set and two Various Ink refills (winners select colors)

CONTEST CRITERIA:
- Contest theme is “Pattern.”
- Original, unpublished Copic artwork only.
- Preexisting work will be accepted.
- No licensed characters.
- You may enter more than once.
- Entries must be received by December 2nd, 2012 at 11:59 PST.
- Winning artwork will be displayed in our 2013 Sets and Kits Guide.
- All entries may be used in Copic digital marketing.*
- Everyone may participate, but only residents of the United States and Canada are eligible to win.*
- Winner will be selected by Copic Marker.

Artwork will be judged on three categories:
1.    Aesthetics (color, style, vibrancy): 1-100 scale
2.    Relevance (how does the artwork relate to the “pattern” theme): 1-100 scale
3.    Uniqueness: 1-100 scale

PROMOTIONAL USAGE OF SUBMISSIONS
By submitting your artwork, you are agreeing to allow Copic Marker the right to use submitted art for promotional purposes in connection with this contest. Copyright for artwork is maintained by the artist and no art will be reproduced without reference to cover contest or for sale. Exclusive use of art, or usage without specifying this contest, requires negotiations with artist(s).

Enter by December 2nd: (can’t see the entry form below? Access it directly here)

Fill out my online form.

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Good luck!

*Digital marketing includes Copic web properties, social media and email campaigns.

*This contest is run by Imagination International, Inc., the distributor of Copic Markers in the United States and Canada. We are legally prohibited from sending product to other countries.

11/1/2012 1:41:45 PM | Comments (0) | Send a Message (PeaMail) | Vote for this Blog Post

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