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Lee Kohse on Copics

Comic artist Lee Kohse shares how he incorporates Copic markers into his creative process. Lee is the cover artist and creative director for Speed Racer, an Allegory production. As a freelance artist, he has created art for Star Wars, Lord of the Rings, Dreamworks, 20th Century Fox, Indiana Jones and more.

Want to try our markers for yourself? Join us at Anime Expo 2012, June 29-July 2nd at the Los Angeles Convention Center. This year we’re the official sponsor of Artist Alley! You can find us at Booth #560.

We’re also delivering tons of Copic programming for all skill levels in the Copic Classroom - Room #302. Imagine a 800 square foot room dedicated to Copic fans. It’ll be fun, we hope to see you there!

5/30/2012 12:51:55 PM | Comments (0) | Send a Message (PeaMail) | Vote for this Blog Post

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Guest Post: Fabric Folds by Brandi York

Rendering Fabric Folds with Copic Markers - by Brandi YorkThis week, artist Brandi York shares tips on creating realistic fabric folds with Copic markers. Enjoy!

In this tutorial, we’re going to cover rendering folds in fabric. I’m touching on my geek roots again, mixing a bit of Alphonse Mucha with World of Warcraft (e.g., Warlock) and having a ball. In this tutorial, as always, I will be using Copic Sketch markers with a Copic Bleed-resistant Sketchbook.

At this point, I’ve rendered the majority of the piece (although things often change and get touched up as I go along), leaving the gown for last. I picked out my color scheme ahead of time, mostly to try and make sure everything would mesh in the end, particularly with the green flames. I began with a hint of G20 around the edges of the gown, mainly to help draw the green into the gown, despite the fact that it will be purple in the end. Consider it a reflected light from the flames behind.

Rendering Fabric Folds with Copic Markers - by Brandi York

Beginning with V22 I start to lay in the base color of the gown, careful to leave where the G20 has been laid in. I use the G20 to blend the edges of the two colors together, to create a little more of a glow affect. I moved quickly, not worrying too much about streaking as I hit the skirt of the gown, as most of that will get darkened up.

Rendering Fabric Folds with Copic Markers - by Brandi York
I move next to V25, laying in the middletone values. I use V22 to soften the edges where the value shifts, leaving it sharper under the folds. I keep in mind the direction of my light as well as the direction the fabric is moving. In many areas, because of the art nouveau style, the lines are already there to dictate which way the fabric is moving. In most of my normal work this would not be the case, so I keep in mind how the fabric is falling. If you’re unsure, you can always drape a bedsheet between two hangers and play with the folds, or wear a coat or dress and take photos of yourself to get the idea of what you’re trying to render. Folds will always be the darkest areas, so I go in and keep layering the V25 until it won’t get any darker.

At this point, I layer some Y21 into the deeper folds for three reasons – one, complementary colors. Yellow and purple are opposites, so one will significantly darken the other. (Although due to the nature of Copics, it will lighten until I layer V25 over it again.) Secondly, it will warm up the shadows, creating a nice contrast to the cool shade of the gown. And third, it draws the color of the background though the piece.

Rendering Fabric Folds with Copic Markers - by Brandi York

Next, V28 to further darken the folds and shadows. There is a bit of push and pull here at this stage, darkening a good majority of the gown, while maintaining the values we’ve laid in prior. To further push the glow of the green, and enhance the tone of the gown, I layer G20 over the whole of the gown. This brightens the lighter edges of the folds and seems to bring a new depth to the whole gown.

Rendering Fabric Folds with Copic Markers - by Brandi York
One of my favorite things about Copics is the ability to change your mind. Now, granted, I probably couldn’t go in at this point and decide to make her blonde, but I was able to change part of the drape of the gown to the same shades of pink (RV66 and RV32) that are in the stones in the border. I used the RV66 and some more of Y21 to add some bits of color elsewhere in the gown, again to emphasize the colors and depth of the gown. For the last kick of dark, I used BV29 in the deepest shadows (as well as some RV66 for some variation).

Rendering Fabric Folds with Copic Markers - by Brandi York
I finish off the whole piece with a Sakura Gelly Roll in white. The beauty of this pen is once dry you can tone the white, as I did in her hair.

Rendering Fabric Folds with Copic Markers - by Brandi York
Hope you’ve enjoyed this little bit of artistic geekery!

Tutorial colors: G20, V22, V25, V28, Y21, RV32, RV66, BV29
Complete colors: G20, V15, V22, V25, V28, Y21, Y23, Y32, RV32, RV66, RV91, RV99,
BV20, BV23, BV25, BV29, R000, E00, E01, E02, E04, E19, E27, E34, YR24, YG21, YG23, YG25

See more of Brandi’s fantastic illustrations on Copic Color, and add your own work while you’re there!

5/29/2012 11:38:00 AM | Comments (0) | Send a Message (PeaMail) | Vote for this Blog Post

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Operation Write Home: Memorial Day Blog Hop

Operation Write Home Memorial Day Project by Sherrie Siemens for Copic MarkerCopic Marker is proud to support our nation’s deployed heroes through Operation Write Home®. This organization has sent over one million cards overseas, allowing our service members to keep in touch with their loved ones while they’re away.

We want to invite you to join in this amazing service and send in your beautiful cards to be used by our nation’s heroes. Visit Operation Write Home for the details.

Today we’re happy to be a part of the Operation Write Home Memorial Day Blog Hop! This card, based on OWH Sketch #109, was designed by Copic Design Team Member Sherrie Siemens. View her tutorial below, and click the banner at the bottom of the post to start hopping!

Operation Write Home Memorial Day Card Project by Sherrie Siemens for Copic Marker

Step 1: Stamp the “Soldier Girl” image from My Favorite Things, due for release June 5th, onto X-Press It Blending Card .  Stamp another image on a Post-it note.

Operation Write Home Memorial Day Card Project by Sherrie Siemens for Copic Marker
Step 2: Color the skin areas on the image. Don’t forget those strong cast shadows that land on her face from her hat. There are also cast shadows on her legs and arms from her uniform. Use BV20 sparingly to sink the very deepest of shadows on the skin.

Operation Write Home Memorial Day Card Project by Sherrie Siemens for Copic Marker
Step 3: Color the main clothing. I love the E80 series for its green tone in the earth color family. My light source is in the upper right so I have a large cast shadow falling on her uniform from her head. I did not leave any area of her uniform white because I did not want to give the illusion of shininess.

Operation Write Home Memorial Day Card Project by Sherrie Siemens for Copic Marker
Step 4: Color the trim. I used the same copic marker values for the trim, just in another tone. In this case the E50s.

Operation Write Home Memorial Day Card Project by Sherrie Siemens for Copic Marker
Step 5: Color the hair. Make sure to have a streaked appearance.

Operation Write Home Memorial Day Card Project by Sherrie Siemens for Copic Marker
Step 6: 
I added some BVs to sink some of my shadows further on her uniform.

Operation Write Home Memorial Day Card Project by Sherrie Siemens for Copic Marker
Step 7: 
Mask your finished image with a Post-it note and airbrush Y21 on the “sunny side” of the image.

Operation Write Home Memorial Day Card Project by Sherrie Siemens for Copic Marker
Step 8: Airbrush some W2 over the entire surface to change the color tone of the original card stock. Now it will match the patterned paper.

Operation Write Home Memorial Day Card Project by Sherrie Siemens for Copic Marker
Step 9: Airbrush some W4 on the shadow side of the image.

Operation Write Home Memorial Day Card Project by Sherrie Siemens for Copic Marker
Step 10: Airbrush the white resin embellishment with RV32 and then W2, to grey down the vibrancy.

Operation Write Home Memorial Day Card Project by Sherrie Siemens for Copic Marker
Step 11: To match my image I directly colored a few of the squares on the embellishment with E84

Operation Write Home Memorial Day Project by Sherrie Siemens for Copic Marker
Operation Write Home Memorial Day Card ProjectFinal Project Supplies:
Copic Sketch Markers
Copic Airbrush System
Soldier Girl Stamp (My Favorite Things)
Tuxedo Black Memento Ink (Tsukineko)
X-Press It Blending Card
Fossil Card Stock (My Favorite Things)
Pink Lady Patterned Paper (Melissa Frances)
Attic Treasures Sticker Banner (Melissa Frances)
Resin Heart Piece (Melissa Frances)

Operation Write Home

5/26/2012 12:32:45 PM | Comments (0) | Send a Message (PeaMail) | Vote for this Blog Post

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Operation Write Home: Memorial Day Blog Hop

Operation Write Home Memorial Day Project by Sherrie Siemens for Copic MarkerCopic Marker is proud to support our nation’s deployed heroes through Operation Write Home®. This organization has sent over one million cards overseas, allowing our service members to keep in touch with their loved ones while they’re away.

We want to invite you to join in this amazing service and send in your beautiful cards to be used by our nation’s heroes. Visit Operation Write Home for the details.

Today we’re happy to be a part of the Operation Write Home Memorial Day Blog Hop! This card, based on OWH Sketch #109, was designed by Copic Design Team Member Sherrie Siemens. View her tutorial below, and click the banner at the bottom of the post to start hopping!

Operation Write Home Memorial Day Card Project by Sherrie Siemens for Copic Marker

Step 1: Stamp the “Soldier Girl” image from My Favorite Things, due for release June 5th, onto X-Press It Blending Card .  Stamp another image on a Post-it note.

Operation Write Home Memorial Day Card Project by Sherrie Siemens for Copic Marker
Step 2: Color the skin areas on the image. Don’t forget those strong cast shadows that land on her face from her hat. There are also cast shadows on her legs and arms from her uniform. Use BV20 sparingly to sink the very deepest of shadows on the skin.

Operation Write Home Memorial Day Card Project by Sherrie Siemens for Copic Marker
Step 3: Color the main clothing. I love the E80 series for its green tone in the earth color family. My light source is in the upper right so I have a large cast shadow falling on her uniform from her head. I did not leave any area of her uniform white because I did not want to give the illusion of shininess.

Operation Write Home Memorial Day Card Project by Sherrie Siemens for Copic Marker
Step 4: Color the trim. I used the same copic marker values for the trim, just in another tone. In this case the E50s.

Operation Write Home Memorial Day Card Project by Sherrie Siemens for Copic Marker
Step 5: Color the hair. Make sure to have a streaked appearance.

Operation Write Home Memorial Day Card Project by Sherrie Siemens for Copic Marker
Step 6: 
I added some BVs to sink some of my shadows further on her uniform.

Operation Write Home Memorial Day Card Project by Sherrie Siemens for Copic Marker
Step 7: 
Mask your finished image with a Post-it note and airbrush Y21 on the “sunny side” of the image.

Operation Write Home Memorial Day Card Project by Sherrie Siemens for Copic Marker
Step 8: Airbrush some W2 over the entire surface to change the color tone of the original card stock. Now it will match the patterned paper.

Operation Write Home Memorial Day Card Project by Sherrie Siemens for Copic Marker
Step 9: Airbrush some W4 on the shadow side of the image.

Operation Write Home Memorial Day Card Project by Sherrie Siemens for Copic Marker
Step 10: Airbrush the white resin embellishment with RV32 and then W2, to grey down the vibrancy.

Operation Write Home Memorial Day Card Project by Sherrie Siemens for Copic Marker
Step 11: To match my image I directly colored a few of the squares on the embellishment with E84

Operation Write Home Memorial Day Project by Sherrie Siemens for Copic Marker
Operation Write Home Memorial Day Card ProjectFinal Project Supplies:
Copic Sketch Markers
Copic Airbrush System
Soldier Girl Stamp (My Favorite Things)
Tuxedo Black Memento Ink (Tsukineko)
X-Press It Blending Card
Fossil Card Stock (My Favorite Things)
Pink Lady Patterned Paper (Melissa Frances)
Attic Treasures Sticker Banner (Melissa Frances)
Resin Heart Piece (Melissa Frances)

Operation Write Home

5/26/2012 1:55:47 AM | Comments (0) | Send a Message (PeaMail) | Vote for this Blog Post

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Industrial Design and an Internship with NASA – a Discussion with Anson Cheung

 

Tell us a bit about yourself…

I’m originally from Hong Kong, and I studied Industrial Design at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) in the US. I was always a tinkerer. As a kid I loved to draw, make things from whatever materials I could find, and take things apart.

I was first introduced to design as an actual career path in high school, where I took a design and technology class for a few years. I learned basic techniques in hand and industrial fabrication, and was also exposed to how good design could make a product much usable and desirable. I decided that this blend of creativity, hands on skills, and problem solving was what I wanted to do.

At RISD, I dived into industrial design, exploring the wider applications: not just designing products, but systems, digital applications, and even spacecraft. RISD also gave me a much deeper understanding of how things were made in the real world by allowing us to experiment with metal, wood, and plastic with our own hands. I had a lot of fun at RISD, and it prepared me a lot for the real world of design (even though I didn’t know it at the time).

anson cheung nasa sketch concept art

What are your biggest sources of inspiration?

My biggest source of inspiration would be seeing things around me, and imagining how they could be better, simpler, more intuitive. Of course I’m also inspired greatly by famous designers and designs that have made an impact on our world. Along with many others, I admire Apple for their continuing ability to innovate and push technology forward to the users benefit, while promoting an excellence in design and giving their devices a character that defines consumer electronics today. Other designers whose work inspires me include Naoto Fukasawa, Dieter Rams, Charles and Ray Eames. I also find a lot of inspiration in where I live. I’ve lived in so many different cities around the world, each giving me a different feel and mindset that influences my work.

anson cheung nasa concept sketch

You’re were an intern for NASA. Could you describe a typical day at your internship there?

I was an intern at the Habitability Design Center at NASA Johnson Space Center - a human centered design group that provided design services for various habitability projects from astronaut’s sleeping quarters on the International Space Station, to more conceptual habitats and vehicles for future missions (check out Core77′s visit).

A typical day there might start with a morning talk with our supervisors (two of which are also RISD graduates!) to discuss what needed to be done for the day. There might be some conceptual spacecraft layout sketching to be done, or some CAD work on some equipment we were designing, ordering parts for those equipment designs.

The day might also include some more hands-on work like building space suit mockups in the shops, helping construct a vehicle mockup out of aluminum extrusions, packing food and supplies for habitability experiments out in the desert. Sometimes we’d just go exploring around Johnson Space Center, gathering information and research for our projects. We saw a lot of cool stuff that way.  Sometimes we also got to attend lectures by previous astronauts and other aerospace experts. They had some good stories to tell.

anson cheung concept art for NASA

What’s your favorite thing about being an intern for NASA?

Probably getting to see all the spacecraft and equipment. Seeing the real deal is really cool. Just knowing that some of this stuff is being used in space is pretty amazing. Also to know you’re contributing in some small way to the endeavour of human space flight is rewarding. NASA is a massive organization, and maybe its not what it used to be in its glory days, but to know you had some small part in it is a once in a lifetime experience.

Anson Cheung Nasa Intern

What’s the most difficult, or most surprising, thing about being an industrial designer?

The most difficult thing I’ve experienced in my short career so far is juggling all the demands of the design. The client wants it to be one way, we as designers want it to be this way, the users might want something that isn’t quite feasible, the manufacturer wants it to be easy to make. Since I’ve been working at a few consultancies since I graduated, I get to see a lot of this juggling. Designers can be dreamers, but at the end of the day to get a product made, there are a lot of constraints to work around. And that takes as much creativity as dreaming up crazy ideas, I think.

Why do you prefer Copic markers for your sketches?

I got introduced to Copics in a rendering for product design class in my sophomore year of RISD. Since then I’ve always used Copics when possible. They cover the paper much better without blotting or streaks. Also I love that you can refill them without buying a whole new pen. A refill lasts forever! Of course, I also like the fact that Copics don’t give off as strong a smell that other markers do.

You have your whole career ahead of you. Any future goals or plans that you’d like to share?

Its pretty early in my career right now, and I’m still discovering what I want to do in the real world of design. But I know I want to be in a place in the future where I can be designing real products that have meaning to people and improve the way they live, whether it be at a consultancy or at a corporation.

What words of advice would you give to aspiring industrial designers?

I would say the most important thing to aspiring designers is to be aware, and keep an open mind. Design is everywhere, and a designer’s major talent is to see things in a way that most people don’t, and see creative solutions to problems. It’s easy to get trapped in one way of thinking about design, and its important to expose yourself to many different ways of seeing the world. When you’re in school or a young professional, I think it’s also important to always be open to learning. I’m still constantly learning about the craft of product design from my fellow designers, and I’ve got a long way to go still!

Where can people find you on the web?

You can see my work at www.ansoncheungdesign.com

You can follow my thoughts on design on Twitter at www.twitter.com/ansonzai

5/24/2012 2:09:22 PM | Comments (0) | Send a Message (PeaMail) | Vote for this Blog Post

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Copic at ICON7: The Illustration Conference

ICON 7: The Illustration Conference
Come see us at ICON7: The Illustration Conference, June 13-16th in Providence, Rhode Island! Our product specialist, Marianne Walker, will be on hand to answer all of your Copic questions.

Interested in attending? Learn more about the show, check out the guest speakers and conference schedule, and register to be a part of this informative and inspiring event!

We’re looking forward to meeting you!

5/23/2012 11:04:25 AM | Comments (0) | Send a Message (PeaMail) | Vote for this Blog Post

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Copic Sponsoring Artist Alley at Anime Expo 2012

Copic Sponsoring Anime Expo Artist AlleyWe’re sponsoring Artist Alley at this year’s Anime Expo!

We’re also delivering tons of Copic programming for all skill levels in the Copic Classroom - Room #302. Imagine a 800 square foot room dedicated to Copic fans. It’ll be fun, so join us!

AnimeExpo™ 2012 will be held June 29 – July 2, 2012 at the Los Angeles Convention Center. 

More info on Anime Expo: Held annually in Los Angeles, Anime Expo is North America’s largest anime and manga celebration. Anime Expo™ gives fans the rare opportunity to meet and hear from some of the most famous anime, manga and musical artists from Japan and get into the action through everything from costume play, karaoke and video competitions to exclusive screenings, non-stop video gaming competitions and the wildly popular Masquerade, in which fans transform themselves into their favorite characters through creative costuming, accessories and make-up and put on their own show before an audience of thousands.

5/17/2012 5:51:11 PM | Comments (0) | Send a Message (PeaMail) | Vote for this Blog Post

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Guest Project: Wedding Gift Box by Kristy Dalman

Copic Wedding Project by Kristy DalmanKristy Dalman is the talented owner/artist/designer of Some Odd Girl digital stamps and co-founder of Created from Color. Read on as Kristy demonstrates how to add a special touch to your gift wrap this wedding season!

Whether you are putting on a wedding or attending one, you know that presentation is EVERYTHING. I’ve seen people try to outdo one another at the gift table for that reason – the bigger the better! But that’s not always true. Why not put a smidge more thought into your gift packaging and coordinate the colors? Brides can do it for gifts to their bridal party or guests can do it for the happy couple. Since Copic has 358 colors, the chances are really good that you’ll find that matching hue. I’m going to show you one way you can coordinate your gift box:

To complete this project you will need:

Copic Wedding Project by Kristy Dalman

- Copic ABS
- Copic Various Ink refill and Sketch marker of the same color (I’m using BG11)
- White glitter
- Paper doily
- Box with resist printing (you can see how I made the box at my blog www.theoddgirl.com)
- Colorless Blender Various Ink refill and marker
- Stamps appropriate for the occassion (To/From and sentiment)
- Acrylic block
- Sheer white ribbon
- Wet adhesive
- Paper towel
- Sandwich baggie

One of the great things about Copic markers and the refills is that the Various Ink will adhere to any nonporous surface. We are going to use that to our advantage by color coordinating everything we need.

Copic Wedding Project by Kristy Dalman

The first thing we are doing is to take our glitter, BG11 Various Ink and our baggie for some prep, as this needs to dry. Pour some of the BG11 Various Ink into the baggie and add in a small amount of glitter. Knead the glitter and ink together to get a nice coating on the glitter. Once this is done, pour it onto a piece of paper towel and allow to dry. Next take the baggie, place the ribbon inside and repeat. I didn’t say we could color anything :)

Copic Wedding Project by Kristy Dalman

Next we are going to take our Copic ABS and BG11 Sketch Marker and spray our box, giving it a liberal coating. An even coat is not necessary, though you don’t want it blotchy. Remember that our box was made with a paper that has a resist pattern (make your own pattern with clear embossing!). After your box has been colored, the magic happens! Pour a little of your Colorless Blender Various Ink onto some paper towel and wipe off the ink that was sprayed onto the resist pattern. This is going to give the box a fun pattern, move that color off the resist and onto the paper, and give it a soft look too. If your color isn’t dark enough, you can go back and repeat these steps as many times as you need. Let it dry between to prevent the paper from warping.

Copic Wedding Project by Kristy Dalman

We are going to use our paper doily to put our sentiment and our “To/From” on. Instead of stamp ink we are going to use our BG11 and 0 Sketch markers to ink up our stamps. First place your stamp on the block and color over the stamp with BG11. The clear stamps are great for this as you can easily see the color being added, especially lighter colors (make sure your stamps are clean of old ink before hand). Once you get a good coat, take your Colorless Blender and give a coat to the area on the doily where you want to stamp. Soaking the doily in Colorless Blender “reactivates” the ink, allowing it to transfer. Now we have the perfect ink color too!

Copic Wedding Project by Kristy Dalman

Every wedding needs a little glitter, so next we are taking our wet adhesive and the now dry glitter we prepared earlier to add a little extra touch to our doily. Trace a circle around the inner edge and press it into the glitter. Pressing rather than sprinkling gets the glitter in the adhesive more securely (and makes less of a mess ;) ) Once the glue is dry, write your message and adhere the doily to the center of the top of our box and tie with our colored ribbon. Make sure you put your gift inside before tying it though!

Copic Wedding Project by Kristy Dalman

Ta-Dah! Our gift is wrapped, gorgeous and coordinating! What more could a bride ask for?

Materials Used:
Copic ABS System
Colorless Blender Marker and Various Ink
BG11 Sketch Marker and Various Ink
Stamps – Some Odd Girl (Gifty Gwen and Celebration Mae sentiments)
Resist Paper (that the box was made from) – Heidi Swapp
Glitter – Doodlebug Designs
Adhesive – Ranger Glossy Accents
Ribbon – Celebrate It (Michael’s)

Find Kristy on the web:
Copic Color: http://www.copiccolor.com/SomeOddGirl
Twitter: https://twitter.com/SomeOddGirls
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SomeOddGirls
Blog: http://www.theoddgirl.com/
Some Odd Girl Shop: http://www.someoddgirl.com/

Kristy’s Copic classes:
Created from Color: http://www.createdfromcolor.com/
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/createdfromcolor

5/15/2012 12:09:11 PM | Comments (0) | Send a Message (PeaMail) | Vote for this Blog Post

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Park Your Art Contest – Runners Up Announced

First of all , a great big thank you to everyone who entered, encouraged someone else to enter, or helped spread the word about the contest with a share or a retweet. It was a tough round of judging this year with over six times the entries as last year.

We are now pleased to announce the second and third place winners in our Park Your Art contest! Watch out for our Grand Prize winner announcement on June 2nd!

Congratulations to second place winner Jessica Thomas and third place winner A.J Reinhart – enjoy your new Copic prizes!

Dream of Color - Jessica Thomas

2nd Place - Jessica Thomas

 

3rd Place - A.J. Reinhart

3rd Place - A.J. Reinhart

If you’re in the Eugene, Oregon area, be sure to join us on June 2nd for the Grand Prize winner announcement and unveiling!

5/11/2012 6:30:28 PM | Comments (0) | Send a Message (PeaMail) | Vote for this Blog Post

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Artist Interview with Jennifer Hancock

Jennifer Hancock is a talented freelance designer and fashion illustrator who creates custom bridal illustrations for a variety of clients. Read on to learn more about Jennifer and her work with Copics!

Jennifer Hancock - The Illustrated Bride

Tell us about yourself!
I love to draw!  In an age when most forms of art are becoming digital, I prefer the intimacy of hand-drawn art.  I am happiest curled up on the couch surrounded by art supplies with a pen in my hand and a sketchbook two inches from my nose.

I traveled quite a bit in my youth, and I was fortunate to meet creative people who motivated me to pursue work as an artist. I began work in the fashion industry in New York in 1995, gleaning information about garment construction as a fit model for various designers.  As an adult, my experience includes work as the assistant designer and house fashion illustrator for Miosa Couture, a Northern California custom bridal boutique.  I currently find work as a freelance costume and bridal designer, and as the owner of The Illustrated Bride.

The concept for The Illustrated Bride came about while I was designing at Miosa Couture.  A custom bridal design session at Miosa usually consisted of quickly sketching out designs for technical use in the construction of the gown.  Many designers provide illustrations for their celebrity clients as a keepsake, and Miosa’s brides would often express an interest in purchasing my sketches.  

Where are you from?
I am from Northern California, but most of my high school years were spent in Los Angeles, New York, and Athens, Greece.  I had a crazy childhood, but I think it offered me exposure to other ways of life– I was able to meet many artistic people who made a living doing what they loved.

Jennifer Hancock - The Illustrated Bride

What is your earliest memory of drawing or making art/illustrating or designing?
Around age five I won my first art contest with a drawing of a princess in an elaborate gown – illustrating and designing wedding dresses seems to be a natural transition!

What inspires you to create?
Blank paper and new art supplies!

Jennifer Hancock - The Illustrated Bride

How did you develop your particular style?
Illustrating custom wedding gowns caused me to pay special attention to the way a dress would be constructed, which meant that I was always sure to include all the elements required of dress construction. Though now I mostly create illustrations as keepsakes, I still pay special attention to details and try to illustrate the dress as structurally accurate to the actual dress as possible.

Can you briefly describe your process?
If I am illustrating an actual bride, I review every image I have of her wedding dress in order to get a sufficient understanding of the design.  I kind of deconstruct the dress in my head, and make little illustrated notes as I go.  This helps me to be sure that I am illustrating her actual dress- one missed seam throws off the entire visual intent of the designer, and the illustration no longer looks like the actual gown.

Jennifer Hancock - The Illustrated Bride

How did you happen upon Copic Markers?
I have learned a lot from other artists. I love to collect anatomy books, as well as books about comic and manga artists. I found that many of my favorite artists only used Copic Markers, so I headed on over to my nearest comic book store to test them out.  I have been a diehard follower ever since!

What inspired you to start using Copic for your business?
I had always used them when I doodled for fun, so when my doodles turned into a viable business opportunity, I knew I would never use anything else. I loved all the colors available, the non-streaky finish they gave my illustrations, and the control and comfort I felt using them.

Jennifer Hancock - The Illustrated Bride

Who are some of your favorite artists/illustrators/designers?
Frank Frazetta, Boris Vallejo, and Julie Bell for anatomy and movement in figure drawing, fashion designers Georgina Chapman and Keren Craig of Marchesa, and Sarah Burton of Alexander McQueen (and the works of the late McQueen himself) for fashion.

Jennifer Hancock - The Illustrated Bride

What comments from a teacher or mentor have you received about your work that helped you develop?
My high school art teacher, David Branstetter, was very supportive.  He hung some of my ballpoint pen doodles up in class. At that age it meant a lot to have an adult find value in something I created.  All of my other teachers were not too happy to find the same type of doodles in the margins of my homework.

What’s your favorite part about being an artist/designer?
When I am in creative mode, its fun to kind of become lost in it. The world around me kind of disappears as I focus.

Jennifer Hancock - The Illustrated Bride

What is the worst part about being and artist/designer?
It’s hard to put your work out into the world, its always been a part of you, very personal. Constantly fighting insecurity can be hard.

Do you have any advice for others looking for artistic inspiration?
I thought I wanted to be a designer.  I hated to sew, which you kind of have to love to do as a designer. I realized that pen and paper was my passion, and even though it was hard to let go of the dream, I decided to focus on the part of the dream that made me really happy. My advice would be to find out what it is about creating that you really love, and find a way to focus on that.

Jennifer Hancock - The Illustrated Bride

Find Jennifer on the web:
Portfolio:  The Illustrated Bride
Etsy: The Illustrated Bride
Facebook: Fan Page
Twitter: @illustratebride

5/10/2012 12:26:36 PM | Comments (0) | Send a Message (PeaMail) | Vote for this Blog Post

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Blog Post

Guest Tutorial: Bridal Illustration by Brooke Hagel

Copic Bridal Illustration by Brooke Hagel

This week, New York City-based fashion illustrator Brooke Hagel shares her bridal illustration process. Enjoy!

Hello, I’m Brooke Hagel, a freelance fashion illustrator with two successful Etsy shops, Brooklit and BrooklitBride, that I run from my home based in New York City. The vast majority of my custom commissions are bridal illustrations that friends and family give as wedding and/or anniversary gifts to brides.

For the past few years my marker of choice has been Copic and I was thrilled when Copic contacted me contribute to their blog. I also author my own blog about fashion illustration called Fabulous Doodles. Here’s a breakdown of how my illustration process and how I use my Copic brush tip markers.

All my artwork starts off with a detailed pencil sketch. Here I decide what the bride will look like, determine the pose that best flatters her gown silhouette and add all of the appropriate details and accessories. The pencil sketch is the ground work that I build upon with my markers. Once the sketch is perfected I take a kneaded eraser and basically erase the whole thing to color. I leave just faint lines so I can see where to apply color. I keep the whole under-sketch light because any dark lines that are there will just be intensified once the marker ink is on top of it.

Copic Bridal Illustration by Brooke HagelThe next step is my favorite, this is where I take my Copic markers and apply the color and shading. I pretty much solely use the brush tip end of the marker. With this tip you can create a heavy saturated look by pressing hard, pulling the color up and releasing it for a painterly effect. You can also create shadows by adding second coats of the marker. The layers of marker ink work as though it’s a second coat of paint and the color becomes significantly more saturated. Besides multiple coats of the same color, I also use varying shades of a color to create more depth. You can see examples of this in how I rendered the hair and wedding gown. For the hair I used two different browns (E59 and E49), and with the dress I used two different gray values (C1 and C2) to create the folds and shadows.
Copic Bridal Illustration by Brooke Hagel
Once all the color and shadows have been rendered with my Copics, I finish off the illustration with a white charcoal pencil to add some highlights and a cool gray 90% colored pencil to outline.

Copic Bridal Illustration by Brooke Hagel

Now the illustration is finished and ready to ship out to clients, be added to my bridal print shop or framed! I hope you enjoyed this little tutorial. Have a happy wedding season, and hopefully you can try out some on my illustration techniques on the brides in your life.

Copic Bridal Illustration by Brooke Hagel

For this bridal illustration I used the following Copic markers: 

C1 Cool Gray No.1 (dress)
C2 Cool Gray No.2 (dress)
100 Black (sash)
E53 Raw Silk (skin tone)
E59 Walnut (hair)
E49 Dark Bark (hair shadows)
BG93 Green Gray (leaves)
RV000 Pale Purple (flowers)

Find Brooke on the web:
Blog: Fabulous Doodles
Etsy Shops: Brooklit & Brooklit Bride
Facebook: Fan Page
Twitter: Brooklit

Share your fashion illustrations with us on Facebook and Twitter!

5/1/2012 11:35:24 AM | Comments (0) | Send a Message (PeaMail) | Vote for this Blog Post

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